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STANFORD UNIVERSITY INFORMATION


Stanford University is located in Stanford, California and is a private college. Stanford University is a four year college and offers Bachelor's Degrees, Master's Degrees, Doctoral Degrees, and a number of different programs and courses.

Stanford University is in a relatively urban area (in or near a city), which may be something you prefer if you like a city lifestyle as a student.

Stanford University does not have a rolling admission policy, and you will want to make sure that you get your application in before December 15.

Stanford University is a medium-sized college with an average enrollment of around 14,881 students.

Stanford University accepts about 12% of its applicants on average, and 74% of the students receive some sort of financial aid for college at Stanford University.

If you are looking for more information on financial aid at Stanford University, you can may want to contact Karen Cooper, who is the Director of Financial Aid at Stanford University. You may also qualify for free grants for college in California to attend Stanford University.

You may also need to take one or more of the following tests to qualify for admission at Stanford University:

  • ACT
  • SAT

If you are interested in joining the Army, Stanford University does have an ROTC Army program that is available for attending students.

If you are interested in joining the Navy, Stanford University does have an ROTC Navy program that is available for attending students.

If you are interested in joining the Air Force, Stanford University does have an ROTC Air Force program that is available for attending students.

Stanford University offers the following extracurricular activities to its students:

  • Choral Groups
  • Concert Band
  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Jazz Band
  • Literary Magazine
  • Marching Band
  • Music Ensembles
  • Music Theater
  • Radio Station
  • Sports
  • Student Film
  • TV Station
  • Yearbook

On a 4.0 scale, the average high school gpa for students that are entering Stanford University is 3.9.

You may want to brush up on your ACT preparation as well, because the average ACT score for students that are entering Stanford University is 31.

Don't forget to study for the SAT, because the average SAT score for students that are entering Stanford University is 1450.

Do a lot of students come from out of state to attend Stanford University? Well, about 57% of the student body at Stanford University comes from outside the state of California.

Do a lot of the students at Stanford University live on campus? Well, about 100% live on campus, while 0% live off campus and commute to school every day.

QUICK FACTS ABOUT STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Stanford University Address:


520 Lasuen Mall, Old Union 232
Stanford, California 94305-3005
Phone: 650-723-2300
Fax: 650-725-2846
Web Site: http://www.stanford.edu

Stanford University admission closing date:


December 15

Does Stanford University offer Associate's degrees?


No

Does Stanford University offer Bachelor's degrees?


Yes

Does Stanford University offer Master's degrees?


Yes

Does Stanford University offer Doctoral degrees?


Yes

Stanford University graduation rate:


92.5%

Stanford University retention rate:


98%

Stanford University average high school GPA:


3.9

Stanford University average ACT score:


31

Stanford University average SAT score:


1450

Stanford University tuition cost (estimate):


$32,994



Financial Aid is available only to those who qualify.

Stanford University room & board cost (estimate):


$9,932

Is Stanford University a private college?


Yes

Is Stanford University a coed college?


Yes

Stanford University school calendar:


Quarter

Is Stanford University a 2 year or 4 year college?


4 Years
Please Note: Length of programs pertain to finishing programs in normal time.

Stanford University enrollment:


14,881 Students

Percentage of applicants accepted to Stanford University


12%

Percentage of students at Stanford University receiving financial aid:


74%

Percentage of African American students:


8.8%

Percentage of Native American students:


1.7%

Percentage of Asian students:


22.9%

Percentage of Hispanic students:


10.5%

Percentage of Caucasian students:


48.5%

Percentage of students living on campus:


100%





Other Activities Nearby:


Golf Courses in Stanford


Data provided by Data-lists.com Universities and Colleges Database. Data last updated on 2007-10-17.

STANFORD UNIVERSITY IN CALIFORNIA GRANTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION

Federal Pell Grants

Academic Competitiveness (AC) Grant Program

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Program

Grants and Scholarships available in California

STANFORD UNIVERSITY NEWS

Black holes appear to be orbiting each other
Science & Technology
After 12 years observing black holes at the center of an amalgam of ancient galaxies, a multi-institution team, including Stanford’s Roger Romani, may have recorded the smallest-ever movement of an object across the sky.


Early cardiology care linked to lower risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation
Science & Technology
Patients with the irregular heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation who got early cardiology care had a reduced risk of stroke, probably because they were more likely to be prescribed anticoagulants, Stanford researchers found.  


Climate change – there’s still time to act: Noah Diffenbaugh at TEDxStanford
Science & Technology
Professor Diffenbaugh studies the climate system, including the extreme events that affect agriculture, water resources and human health.


Stanford scientists create a cellular guillotine for studying single-cell wound repair
Research
In an effort to understand how single cells heal, mechanical engineer Sindy Tang developed a microscopic guillotine that efficiently cuts cells in two. Learning more about single-cell wound repair could lead to self-healing materials and machines.


Stanford law professor weighs in on Supreme Court’s decision to hear travel ban case
Law & Policy
Stanford law professor Jayashri Srikantiah discusses the Supreme Court’s decision to hear the Trump Administration’s appeals about Trump’s executive order banning travel of certain nationals from Muslim-majority countries.  


Self-affirmation plays role in minority students’ college success
Social Sciences
African American and Latino students who completed self-affirming writing exercises in middle school took more challenging courses and were more likely to enroll in college, among other positive outcomes.


Why working from home is a ‘future-looking technology’
Social Sciences
Companies and employees benefit from workplace flexibility, says Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom.


Inspirational Stanford athlete Tyrone McGraw dies at 29
Obituaries
Born into difficult circumstances, the two-sport Cardinal athlete in track and football was dedicated to public service.


Spreading life design thinking to other universities
Teaching & Students
Educators from across the country gathered at the d.school to learn how design thinking can help students’ career development. Dave Evans of the Design Program is co-founder of the Life Design Lab, which hosted the event.


U.S. drug policy needs a dose of neuroscience
Law & Policy
Legal and illegal drugs are killing more people than AIDS ever did, yet the nation’s drug policies are based on unproven assumptions about addiction. Neuroscience could help shape more effective policies and save lives.


Examining mixed-race identity in literature
Humanities
English doctoral student Vanessa Seals studies contemporary American novels and memoirs about multiracial people’s experiences to examine the role families play in their search for identity.


Report of the President: Appointments and promotions
University Affairs
Academic Council professoriate appointments and promotions were reviewed by the Advisory Board of the Academic Council and approved by the President.


Insider threats often go undetected
Law & Policy
Stanford political scientist Scott Sagan says the evidence shows that while insider threats may be low-probability events on a day-to-day basis, over time they have a high probability of occurring.  


Annotation tool helps students beyond Stanford
Teaching & Students
Lacuna, a free online annotation platform developed at Stanford, promotes collaborative learning and interdisciplinary conversations. The platform is being used at higher education institutions around the world.


Violent crime increases in right-to-carry states
Law & Policy
Stanford Law School Professor John Donohue found that states that adopted right-to-carry concealed handgun laws have experienced a 13 to 15 percent increase in violent crime in the 10 years after enacting those laws.  


Stanford trustees approve budget and construction projects and honor departing members
University Affairs
The June 14-15 meeting of the Stanford University Board of Trustees was the final one as chair for Steven A. Denning, who has presided as chair since July 2012.


Law graduates encouraged to meet the challenges
Commencement 2017
“Be grateful, but have pride in what you’ve achieved,” said Law School Dean M. Elizabeth Magill to the 287 JD and advanced degree recipients who received their law degrees on June 17.


Work-family balance stressed in Graduate School of Education graduation
Commencement 2017
Prioritize what’s important, work for change and “try not to waste time being frustrated by trying to have it all,” advised Professor Myra Strober at the Graduate School of Education graduation.


Stanford’s Trustees approve the budget and construction projects and honor departing members
University Affairs
The June 14-15 meeting of the Stanford University Board of Trustees was the final one as chair for Steven A. Denning, who has presided as chair since July 2012.


University’s chilled water curtailed
University Affairs


Stanford Commencement 2017 Wacky Walk
Campus Life
Each year, Stanford begins its Commencement ceremony with a fun, nontraditional procession into the stadium known as Wacky Walk. Videographer Kurt Hickman captured some of the highlights.


Database reveals disparities in officers’ treatment of minority motorists
Law & Policy
The Stanford Open Policing Project obtained data on millions of state patrol stops and found evidence that minorities are held to a double standard. The data are being shared with researchers, journalists and the public.


Text of the 2017 Stanford Commencement address by Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar
Campus Life
Text of Commencement address “The Edge and the Core”


California Supreme Court justice encourages graduates to expand their awareness
Campus Life
Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar advised graduates on the value of paying attention to people, events and situations in the periphery of their lives at the 126th Stanford University Commencement.


Surgeon-scientist urges medical school graduates to advocate for equality in health care
Campus Life
The first African American to graduate from the Stanford School of Medicine returned to help celebrate this year’s graduating class.


Stanford Commencement 2017
Campus Life
Stanford celebrated its 126th Commencement Weekend June 16-18, 2017. Experience the highlights, including the Commencement address, the Baccalaureate celebration and the Wacky Walk.


Stanford Commencement Weekend 2017 in pictures
Campus Life
The Class of 2017 was feted by the university community, family and friends during Baccalaureate and Commencement ceremonies that featured both fun times and serious messages.


Remarks by Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne at the 2017 Commencement ceremony
Campus Life
Text of prepared remarks, including introduction of Commencement speaker Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar and concluding remarks remembering alumna Sally Ride.


Prepared text of the 2017 Stanford Commencement address by Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar
Campus Life
Text of Commencement address “The Edge and the Core”


Text of the 2017 Stanford Baccalaureate address by Marian Wright Edelman
Campus Life
Text of “Where Do We Go from Here?”


Prepared text of student Emma Coleman’s Baccalaureate speech
Campus Life
Text of student reflection.


Baccalaureate speaker urges students to fight injustice
Campus Life
Child rights advocate Marian Wright Edelman told graduates to use their talents and skills to shape a better future for the disadvantaged.


Gretchen Daily honored with Blue Planet Prize
Awards
Gretchen Daily, the Bing Professor in Environmental Studies, was honored with a $450,000 award for her work to harmonize people and nature.


Stanford seniors praise Summer Humanities Institute
Humanities
Three graduating Stanford seniors look back at the path their studies took after participating in the first cohort of the Stanford Summer Humanities Institute as high school students.


Senate discusses faculty diversity, ‘Ways’ requirement, emeriti
Faculty & Staff
At its final meeting of the academic year, the Faculty Senate discussed issues including faculty diversity, the Ways of Thinking/Ways of Doing requirement and the Emeriti Council.


Report finds significant racial and ethnic disparities
Social Sciences
Stanford’s Center on Poverty and Inequality’s annual “State of the Union” report found profound and persisting inequalities in the United States in areas like employment, health and housing.


A possible path to sustainable ethanol for fuel
Research
Most of the fuel additive ethanol used in the U.S. is made from corn. But new research reveals that copper can turn carbon dioxide into ethanol without using corn or other plants.


Space robot technology helps self-driving cars and drones on Earth
Research
Space robots that are traveling through space, hauling debris and exploring distant asteroids, may hold the technological key to problems facing drones and autonomous cars here on Earth.


Q&A with Fiorenza Micheli: Monitoring human rights in the seafood sector
Science & Technology
A group of scientists has urged marine scientists to focus attention on human rights violations and other social issues in the seafood sector, in addition to advocating for sustainable practices.


New associate dean for religious life named
Campus Life
Sughra Ahmed, the new associate dean for religious life at Stanford, is a Muslim chaplain who brings extensive experience on university campuses and in interfaith work to her new role.


Planning for the future of Stanford’s physical campus
University Affairs
Catherine Palter, associate vice president for land use and environmental planning, discusses Stanford’s application for an updated General Use Permit, which will guide the physical development of the campus through 2035.


Sociologist probes lack of grassroots climate change activism
Law & Policy
Sociologist Doug McAdam examined 40 years of research and theory on social movements in an attempt to determine why a sustained grassroots movement on climate change has not developed in the United States.


Stanford scholars offer analysis on U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ hearing
Law & Policy
Kori Schake and David Sklansky share their thoughts on the proceedings.


Introducing the solar-powered heart
Science & Technology
Stanford scientists explore using photosynthesis to help damaged hearts.


Skipped classes add up—more than it seems, Stanford researchers say
Teaching & Students
New study finds that middle- and high-school students miss more classes due to part-day absences than full days out.


Stanford scholars offer analysis on U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ hearing before Senate committee
Law & Policy
Attorney General Jeff Sessions appeared before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday. Stanford scholars Kori Schake and David Sklansky share their thoughts on the proceedings.


The Anderson Collection at Stanford University receives new gifts of art
Arts & Creativity
First described as a non-collecting museum, the Anderson Collection proves to be expandable.


Stanford to honor and celebrate graduates at 126th Commencement
Campus Life
Mariano-Florentino “Tino” Cuéllar, associate justice of the Supreme Court of California, will give the Commencement address and Marian Wright Edelman, founder and president of the Children’s Defense Fund, will give the Baccalaureate address.


Big advance in wireless charging of moving electric cars
Research
Stanford scientists have developed a way to wirelessly deliver electricity to moving objects, technology that could one day charge electric vehicles and personal devices like medical implants and cell phones.


Some lesbians enjoyed limited toleration in Nazi Germany
Humanities
History doctoral student Samuel Clowes Huneke analyzed several police files from the 1940s that illuminate the limited toleration some lesbians found during the Nazi regime.


New Stanford graduate is empowering people with disabilities in Thailand
Teaching & Students
New Stanford graduate Oranicha “Natty” Jumreornvong moved across the world to learn more about how to improve the lives of people with disabilities at home in Thailand. Next year she'll attend medical school and hopes to apply what she learns to help people back home.


Catalyst for Collaborative Solutions funds first three interdisciplinary teams
Research
First to be funded are projects involving bacterial diagnostics, sustainable oceans and mental health.


Emphasizing individual solutions to big issues can reduce support for government efforts
Social Sciences
Experiments by political science graduate student Seth Werfel suggest that making individuals aware of how they can help solve large-scale problems makes them less likely to support government-based solutions.


Decadent-sounding labeling may lead people to eat more vegetables
Social Sciences
Stanford psychology scholars applied indulgent labeling – flavorful, exciting descriptions usually used for decadent foods – to vegetables. Their study found that more diners chose vegetables with these indulgent descriptions.


Stepping stones to success
Faculty & Staff
Since 2003, Residential & Dining Enterprises has offered a program – Stepping Stones to Success – that gives Stanford employees a chance to advance their education through classes on everything from reading to writing to computer skills.


Stanford Commencement speakers through the years
University Affairs
As Stanford prepares for Commencement Weekend on June 17 and 18, Stanford Report looks back at graduation speakers over the past 20 years.


New conductor appointed for Stanford Symphony Orchestra and Stanford Philharmonia
Arts & Creativity
The baton passes to Paul Phillips, director of orchestras and chamber music and distinguished senior lecturer in music at Brown University. He joins the Department of Music on July 1.


East Campus construction to ramp up in summer
University Affairs
A number of significant projects are planned for the northeast part of the Stanford campus. Patience and planning ahead are encouraged as temporary disruptions and detours occur.


Scholars analyze Comey hearing
Law & Policy
Stanford scholars offer their thoughts on former FBI Director James Comey’s testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee.


Miguel A. Méndez, Law School’s first Latino professor, dies
Faculty & Staff
Méndez was a pioneer of clinical legal education and Stanford Law School’s first Latino professor. He taught at the school for more than 30 years and was a “beacon” for students.


Commencement awards honor faculty, staff and students
Awards
Three members of the faculty, two members of the staff and three students, including a bachelor’s, master’s and PhD candidate, will receive awards on Sunday, June 18, at the 126th Commencement ceremony in Stanford Stadium.


Innovation Transfer Program helps students make sustainable energy ideas a reality
Teaching & Students
Sustainable energy ideas get a start with the TomKat Center Innovation Transfer Program, which helps student teams turn their concepts and designs into commercial products.


Stanford scholars discuss infrastructure
Law & Policy
Stanford scholars Frank Fukuyama and Raymond Levitt discuss how and where federal dollars should be allocated to enhance the nation’s aging and distressed infrastructure.


Q&A with the curator of the Cantor Arts Center’s exhibition Creativity on the Line
Arts & Creativity
The exhibition and catalogue showcase mid-twentieth-century design for the corporate world.


Message on Stanford’s commitment to progress on climate change
University Affairs
President Marc Tessier-Lavigne and Provost Persis Drell share a message on Stanford's commitment to progress on climate change. Stanford joined 11 other universities in reaffirming their commitment to climate research and sustainable practices.


Cops speak less respectfully to black community members
Science & Technology
Professors Jennifer Eberhardt and Dan Jurafsky along with other Stanford researchers detected racial disparities in police officers’ speech after analyzing more than 100 hours of body camera footage from Oakland Police.


Affirmation of commitment to progress on climate change
University Affairs
The presidents of 12 research universities, including Stanford, have affirmed their commitment to progress on climate change.


Classics student tackles history of geometry diagrams
Humanities
Classics PhD student Eunsoo Lee is trying to reconstruct the history of geometrical and mathematical diagrams by examining copies and translations of Elements, the ancient work of Greek mathematician Euclid.


Pioneering professor emerita in art history continues to break new ground
Arts & Creativity
The three years of research Wanda Corn conducted to produce her exhibition and book, Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern, was underwritten by an Andrew W. Mellon Emeritus Fellowship administered by Stanford’s Department of Art and Art History.


Seeking solutions to climate change
In the Spotlight
Stanford faculty study the causes and effects of climate change, and investigate new ways of reducing carbon emissions through green energy technologies and policy decisions.


Big ideas are getting harder to find
Social Sciences
Modern-day inventors — even those in the league of Steve Jobs — will have a tough time measuring up to the productivity of the Thomas Edisons of the past.


Stanford psychologists examine how culture can guide giving
Social Sciences
New research by Stanford psychologists analyzes cultural effects on giving. They find that people are willing to offer more money to others who display similar emotional expressions and that those expressions are even more powerful factors than race or sex.


A class of its own
In the Spotlight
Immersive, enlightening – and sometimes unorthodox – courses help fulfill Stanford’s founding mission.


Karl Deisseroth wins Fresenius Research Prize
Awards
The Stanford psychiatrist, neuroscientist and bioengineer will be honored with a 4 million euro prize for three distinct contributions to the medical field: optogenetics, hydrogel-tissue chemistry and research into depression.


Q&A with climate experts on Paris agreement decision
Law & Policy
The president announced that the United States will withdraw from the Paris climate agreement. Four Stanford scholars discuss the implications of this decision.


Most sanctions lifted on Stanford Band
Campus Life
As a result of hard work on the part of the student leadership of the Stanford Band, the university’s Band Oversight Committee has removed the group’s provisional status, allowing it to again be considered a student organization in good standing.


World’s most powerful X-ray laser beam creates ‘molecular black hole’
Science & Technology
When the X-rays blast electrons out of one atom, stripping it from the inside out, it steals more from its neighbors – a new insight that could help advance high-res imaging of whole viruses, bacteria and complex materials.


Are these the next big ideas?
Teaching & Students
Stanford Graduate School of Business students pitch their startup ideas to VCs, angels and alumni.


Mapping groundwater from the air
Science & Technology
Low-flying helicopters help map underground freshwater resources and forecast saltwater intrusion along the Monterey Bay.


Exploring the use of algorithms in the criminal justice system
Science & Technology
More jurisdictions are using algorithms to help make decisions about bail, raising important questions about their fairness compared to human judgment.


Chris Manning: How computers are learning to understand language?
Science & Technology
A computer scientist discusses the evolution of computational linguistics and where it's headed next. He was recently named the Thomas M. Siebel Professor in Machine Learning.


Progress report on student Title IX process
University Affairs
In a letter to the campus community, Provost Persis Drell provides a progress report on the first 15 months of the Student Title IX Process, the university's pilot process for investigating and hearing Title IX cases.


New Mary M. and Sash A. Spencer Center for vision research established at Stanford
Science & Technology
Philanthropic gift creates center to help accelerate translational research, recruit faculty and train the next generation of leaders in vision science.


Stanford offers a preview of the redesign of its main website
Uncategorized


Senate pays tribute to John Etchemendy, hears report on Stanford Arts
Arts & Creativity
Speakers at the May 25 meeting included special guest Jonathan R. Cole, a professor at Columbia University; Harry J. Elam, Jr., vice president for the arts; Alexander Nemerov, chair of art and art history; and Stephen Sano, professor (teaching) of music.


Stanford community honors winners of 2017 Amy J. Blue Awards
Awards
Stanford celebrated the accomplishments of the 2017 Amy J. Blue Award winners with an afternoon ceremony and reception in Lagunita Courtyard.


Hoover Golden State Poll: Voters know what road to take on infrastructure
Law & Policy
A new poll by the Hoover Institution asked Californians to choose which infrastructure investments they would be willing to see their taxes go up to pay for.


Good books, like teachers, acknowledge children’s lives, says author Jacqueline Woodson
Social Sciences
The acclaimed writer of young-adult fiction discussed her writing practice with Professor Harry Elam as part of the annual Cubberley Lecture.


High pressure key to lighter, stronger metal alloys
Science & Technology
Subjecting complex metal mixtures called high-entropy alloys to extremely high pressures could lead to finer control over the arrangement of their atoms, which in turn can result in more desirable properties.


Junot Díaz encourages community activism during lecture
Humanities
Junot Díaz, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, advocated for minority groups to come together and fight against oppression in his speech during the Presidential Lecture in the Humanities and Arts event.


Ronald Alexander, professor emeritus of communication, dies
Obituaries
Ronald Alexander was best known for his attention to detail and dedication to his students. The professor emeritus of communication had a distinguished career at the National Film Board of Canada before joining the Stanford faculty in 1970.


Geophysics champion George Thompson dies at 97
Obituaries
Thompson’s dedication to Stanford spanned seven decades, from his years as a student to research contributions as a faculty member.


Fitness trackers accurately measure heart rate but not calories burned
Science & Technology
A Stanford Medicine inquiry showed that six out of seven wristband activity monitors measured heart rate within 5 percent. None, however, measured energy expenditure well.


Focus on small steps first, then shift to the larger goal
Social Sciences
Research shows that incremental achievements are good early motivators, but their effect wanes as the finish line nears.


Stanford dance faculty member seeks common ground in the rural West
Arts & Creativity
Alex Ketley's film documents his research about the role dance plays in rural life and challenges the "urban/rural prejudice" commonly found in urban environments.


Multicultural Springfest celebrates diversity and dedication of Stanford staff
Faculty & Staff
The 20th Annual Multicultural Springfest will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 25 in Frost Amphitheater. The event includes the fourth annual Celebrating Staff Careers Ceremony.


Stanford psychologists examine ‘sins of omission’
Social Sciences
Stanford researchers found that children as young as 4 years old, under certain conditions, can discern “sins of omission” – misleading but technically accurate information. The researchers found that the order in which information is presented makes a dramatic difference for the study’s youngest participants.  


Stanford professors discuss ethics involving driverless cars
Social Sciences
Self-driving technology presents vast ethical challenges and questions. Several professors and interdisciplinary groups at Stanford who are tackling this issue  offer their perspectives on the topic.


Beyond the Farm
Campus Life
Through an annual day of volunteering, alumni, students and staff extend Stanford’s spirit of service to communities around the world.


Injection molding class teaches valuable lessons in mass production
Science & Technology
In an advanced design and manufacturing class at the Product Realization Lab, students push themselves to make plastic parts that look deceptively simple.


Russia’s cyber meddling
Social Sciences
In this Raw Data podcast, Stanford experts examine cybersecurity challenges through Russia’s interference in the 2016 election.


Is carbon removal technology a high-stakes gamble?
Science & Technology
Stanford scientists explain the risks of betting the world’s future on massive-scale deployment of carbon removal technologies.


David Sklansky on Robert Mueller Appointment as DOJ Russia Investigation Special Counsel
Law & Policy
In this Q&A, Professor David Sklansky discusses the role of the special counsel, Mueller’s qualifications, how the various investigations might converge, and more.


Reyno Peralta, ‘caretaker in the truest sense of the word,’ wins 2017 Amy J. Blue Award
Awards
Reyno Peralta, the lead custodian at Florence Moore Hall, is one of this year’s winners of the Amy J. Blue Award, which honors staff members who are exceptionally dedicated, supportive of colleagues and passionate about their work.


Laura Hubbard, known for tremendous energy and compassion, wins 2017 Amy J. Blue Award
Faculty & Staff
Laura Hubbard, associate director for the Center for African Studies, is one of this year’s winners of the Amy J. Blue Award, which honors staff members who are exceptionally dedicated, supportive of colleagues and passionate about their work.


Stanford honors professor, staff member and the Diversity and First-Gen Office with President’s Awards for Excellence Through Diversity
Faculty & Staff
The winners of the individual awards are Ben Barres, a professor at Stanford Medicine, and James Jordan, a senior manager at the Stanford Alumni Association. The winner of the program award is the Diversity and First-Gen Office.


Redwood City story
University Affairs
University leaders, Redwood City elected officials and community representatives celebrate construction of new Stanford Redwood City campus.


Tiny squeeze or stretch boosts catalytic performance
Science & Technology
Nanoscale stretching or compressing significantly boosts the performance of ceria, a material widely used in catalytic converters and clean-energy technologies.


Tim Wise and activists focus on racism, white privilege at Stanford event
Campus Life
“If you don't see yourself as bound up with the lives of other people, I'm not sure what kind of help you can be,” author and anti-racism activist Tim Wise recently told a Stanford audience.


Elizabeth Fischbach, a ‘storyteller par excellence,’ wins an Amy J. Blue Award
Faculty & Staff
Fischbach, exhibition designer and manager for Stanford Libraries’ Special Collections, is one of this year’s winners of the Amy J. Blue Award, which honors staff members who are exceptionally dedicated, supportive of colleagues and passionate about their work.


Stanford Board of Trustees elects Carrie W. Penner to a five-year term
University Affairs
Penner, who earned two master’s degrees at the Stanford Graduate School of Education, is currently serving as a member of its Advisory Council.  


Enabling undergraduates to explore the ‘democratization of aerospace’
Teaching & Students
A new major in aeronautics and astronautics also includes electives to ensure that non-majors can work with UAVs, satellites, autonomous systems, and other flight technologies.


Gene matches could aid science, but raise privacy concerns
Law & Policy
A new way of connecting distinct sets of DNA markers from the same person could help police trying to catch criminals or scientists looking to collaborate, but it may raise privacy concerns as well.


Stanford Taiko celebrates 25 years on campus
Campus Life
The performance group that got its start with a research grant celebrates 25 years with a reunion and a performance in Bing Concert Hall.


Women’s water polo wins sixth national title
Teaching & Students
With nine seconds to go, Maggie Steffens scored the goal that clinched the Cardinal's sixth NCAA championship in women's water polo.


Stanford increases the number of all-gender restrooms on campus
Campus Life
The university’s efforts to convert restrooms to all-gender facilities and to offer its students more options in the residences reflect its commitment to inclusiveness.


Stanford takes a cautious approach in its 2017-18 Budget Plan
Faculty & Staff
Tim Warner, vice provost for budget and auxiliaries management, presented Stanford’s 2017-18 Budget Plan to the Faculty Senate yesterday.


Stanford president reflects on his first eight months and on long-range planning
Faculty & Staff
In his first address to the annual meeting of the Academic Council, President Marc Tessier-Lavigne reported on the university’s long-range planning process and shared the stage with four of the faculty members heading the effort.


French civilization, culture professor Marc Bertrand dies
Faculty & Staff
Marc Bertrand, professor emeritus of French, taught French civilization and cultural history to generations of students during his time at Stanford. He died April 28 at 83.


Gender-swapped play takes on the ‘men’s rights’ movement
Arts & Creativity
Stanford graduate students in classics translate and adapt an ancient Greek play to lampoon a modern political movement.


New technology monitors and maintains drug levels
Science & Technology
A new technology can monitor and maintain the level of drug in the bloodstream of animals. If it works in people, it could deliver the optimal dose of life-saving drugs and prevent harmful over- or underdosing.


Software creates on-demand ‘flash organizations’
Science & Technology
Flash organizations are a new crowdsourcing technique that enables anyone to assemble an entire organization from a paid crowdsourcing marketplace and lead that organization in pursuit of complex, open-ended goals.


Cardinal earns 14 perfect scores in NCAA academic progress survey
Awards
Stanford leads all Football Bowl Subdivision schools with 14 athletic programs earning perfect 1,000 multi-year scores in the annual Academic Progress Rate statistics issued by the NCAA.


Commitment, generosity guide Iranian Studies program to great heights
Social Sciences
Students now have the opportunity to dive into the history of Islam and other religions in Iran, dissect the modern politics of the country, learn Persian through a series of language courses or discover the country’s contemporary cultural movements and its world-renowned film scene.


Rumors of inflationary theory’s demise premature
Science & Technology
A who’s who of theoretical physicists, including Stanford’s Andrei Linde, has written a letter to Scientific American disputing a recent story that declared the demise of the inflationary theory of how the universe began.


Stanford Libraries, Hoover Institution gather thousands of archival materials on Iran
Humanities
Stanford has acquired thousands of archives about Iran’s history, politics and culture that are held at the Hoover Institution and the Stanford University Libraries.


New materials bring quantum computing closer to reality
Science & Technology
Quantum computing could outsmart current computing for complex problem solving, but only if scientists figure out how to make it practical. A Stanford team is investigating new materials that could become the basis for such an advance.


Studying more strategically equals improved exam scores
Social Sciences
Postdoctoral scholar Patricia Chen is lead author of a study that found that college students employing a strategic approach to the use of study resources improved their exam scores by an average of one-third of a letter grade.


Stanford biologist Robert Sapolsky takes on human behavior, free will
Science & Technology
With the publication of his latest book, Robert Sapolsky tackles the best and worst of human behavior and the nature of justice in the absence of free will.


Stanford launches ‘My Cardinal Green’ rewards program for students, faculty, staff
Faculty & Staff
Under Sustainable Stanford’s new program, faculty, students and staff can receive rewards for doing simple but meaningful acts that reduce the university’s environmental footprint.


Stanford expert discusses runoff for French presidency
Social Sciences
Cécile Alduy, a professor of French and Italian and expert in contemporary French politics, analyzes France’s presidential runoff on Sunday between Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen.


New tool offers additional sexual violence reporting options for students
University Affairs
With support and advocacy from student leaders, Stanford has adopted a new tool for students to document and report experiences with sexual and relationship violence.


Stanford student analyzes Islamic militants’ online propaganda
Social Sciences
Senior political science major Shazad Mohamed is applying his experience in the tech industry to analyze social media use by ISIS as part of his undergraduate research project.


Three Stanford faculty elected to National Academy of Sciences
Awards
Dominque Bergmann, John Pringle and Anne Villeneuve are now part of an organization designed to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology.


Japanese immigrant’s diaries on display
Humanities
A Stanford alumnus and his family donated the diaries of his great-uncle, a Japanese businessman who lived in the San Francisco Bay Area in the early 1900s. The diaries give a unique perspective into life for Japanese immigrants during that time.


Brown Institute announces ‘Magic Grants’ to transform world of media
Awards
Collaboration between Stanford School of Engineering and Columbia School of Journalism has awarded its 2017-18 grants to 11 teams of innovators.


Interest grows in the study of games, interactive media
Campus Life
Faculty, staff and students are pushing the Stanford community to embrace and pursue the study of games and interactive media, an interdisciplinary, applicable and socially relevant topic.


What a warming planet means for spread of mosquito-borne diseases
Science & Technology
A new analysis by Stanford researchers reveals that the ideal temperature for the spread of mosquito-born diseases like dengue, chikungunya and Zika is 29 degrees C. This finding helps predict disease outbreaks in a warming world.


Early culture shaped by migration and population growth
Social Sciences
Bursts of cultural advance are usually assumed to result from climate or biological changes. A new theory digs into how humans innovate, and suggests such bursts could be the result of population dynamics and culture itself.


Stanford scholar’s creation becomes part of Mongolian law
Humanities
A meeting between Stanford communications Professor James Fishkin and Gombojav Zandanshatar, a member of Mongolia’s parliament, inspired a new law that requires an in-depth method of public opinion polling to take place before an amendment to Mongolia’s constitution can be enacted.


Organic carbon can resist breakdown in underground environments
Science & Technology
A new study reveals that organic matter whose breakdown would yield only minimal energy for hungry microorganisms preferentially builds up in floodplains, illuminating a new mechanism of carbon sequestration.


Flexible, organic and biodegradable: The new wave of electronics
Science & Technology
A new semiconductor developed by Stanford researchers is as flexible as skin and easily degradable. It could have diverse medical and environmental applications, without adding to the mounting pile of global electronic waste.


Knight-Hennessy Scholars launches inaugural application
University Affairs
The first cohort of up to 50 Knight-Hennessy scholars will begin studies at Stanford in fall 2018.


Stanford expert analyzes Russia’s past
Humanities
Stanford history professor Nancy Kollmann discusses the establishment of the Russian Empire and how Russia’s past shapes its present.


Three staffers win 2017 Amy J. Blue Awards
Faculty & Staff
The awards honor the life and work of the late Amy J. Blue, an associate vice president for administrative services and facilities, who was known as a woman of incisive intelligence, abundant energy and unrelenting honesty.


Faculty Senate meeting April 27
Faculty & Staff
Speakers at the April 27 meeting included Harry J. Elam, Jr., vice provost for undergraduate education; Patricia J. Gumport, vice provost for graduate education; Corrie Potter, director of Institutional Research & Decision Support; President Marc Tessier-Lavigne; and Provost Persis Drell.


When bridges collapse: Are we underestimating the risk?
Science & Technology
Studying how and why bridges have collapsed in the past identifies the limitation of current risk assessment approach and demonstrates the value of new perspectives on climate change impact.


Stanford senior examines popular theater in London during WWI
Humanities
Senior Holly Dayton analyzed popular theater plays in London during the time of the Great War as part of her history honors thesis research.


Admitted students sample life at Stanford
Campus Life
Ready, set, go: Admit Weekend offers prospective freshmen a taste of life on the Farm, with academic and social activities designed to showcase the university’s breadth and depth.


Report details universities’ efforts on sexual assault
University Affairs
Stanford is among the U.S. universities included in a new report by the Association of American Universities summarizing campus initiatives to combat sexual violence. The report presents an opportunity to learn from others, Provost Persis Drell says.


Admit Weekend opens Thursday for students accepted to Stanford’s Class of 2021
Campus Life
Admit Weekend offers prospective freshmen a glimpse of life on the Farm, with academic and social activities designed to showcase the university's breadth and depth.


Stanford scientists test links between extreme weather and climate change
Science & Technology
A new four-step “framework” aims to test the contribution of climate change to record-setting extreme weather events.


Two more Stanford alums win 2017 Gates Cambridge Scholarships
Teaching & Students
The Stanford alums are two of the 55 people recently awarded scholarships during the international round of the competition.


‘In the Moment’ at TEDxStanford
Campus Life
Speakers at the sixth annual TEDxStanford conference addressed pressing issues, including foreign policy crises, the nation’s opioid epidemic and affordable health care.


Ideas sought for long-range planning process
University Affairs
At a town hall meeting Friday about the university’s ongoing long-range planning process, President Marc Tessier-Lavigne and Provost Persis Drell encouraged faculty, staff and students to submit their ideas for future initiatives and for strengthening Stanford’s foundation.  


Director named for the Leland Stanford Junior University Marching Band
Campus Life
Russell Gavin, associate professor of music education/band at Baylor University, will begin his new position as director of the Stanford Band on May 8.


Stanford’s Generation Anthropocene podcast is back
Science & Technology
Started by two graduate students, the Generation Anthropocene podcast has grown into an award-winning production and beloved undergraduate course. Its fifth year brings new insight into how humans are changing the planet.


The #NextGreatDiscovery
Science & Technology
Many of today's greatest innovations are built on fundamental research conducted decades ago. Though impossible to predict where experiments by Stanford investigators will lead, investing in research is crucial to keeping the #NextGreatDiscovery alive.


Sustainable Stanford
Campus Life
Sustaining Earth’s resources is ingrained in the way Stanford educates students, conducts research, operates its buildings and supports campus life.


New course tackles designing for people with disabilities
Science & Technology
A new course teaches undergraduates how to design for people with physical disabilities. Each week, students learn about a different disability, then brainstorm design ideas to address issues and present their work to the class.


A better way to predict environmental impacts of agricultural production
Science & Technology
Many companies want to know how the creation of their products affects the environment. Scientists at Stanford, the University of Minnesota and Unilever have found a way to better predict and quantify environmental impacts.


Genetic evidence points to nocturnal early mammals
Science & Technology
New genetic evidence suggesting that early mammals had good night-time vision adds to fossil and behavioral studies indicating that early mammals were nocturnal.


Stanford students learn about community from Spanish-speaking immigrants
Humanities
Community-engaged Spanish classes take students outside the bubble and change their worldview along the way.


It’s a Wild Party at Stanford’s Memorial Auditorium
Arts & Creativity
This year's Ram's Head musical uses art to explore some of the darker areas of human behavior.  


Four Stanford alumni awarded 2017 Soros Fellowships for New Americans
Awards
Soros Fellows are immigrants and the children of immigrants who are chosen for their creativity, initiative and sustained accomplishment.


Stanford Professor Dave Donaldson honored with prestigious economics award
Awards
Stanford’s Dave Donaldson has been honored by the American Economics Association with the John Bates Clark Medal, recognizing his innovative and scholarly contributions in the field of international trade.


Undergrads win prize for work combating antibiotic resistance
Awards
Stanford undergraduates have won a national prize for their work developing a new antibiotic to combat the growing threat of multidrug-resistant bacteria.


Annual lab swap diverts unused supplies from landfill
Campus Life
More than 100 Stanford laboratories got rid of unneeded equipment and reagents and found new-to-them gems at the annual lab swap, part of Stanford’s Cardinal Green Labs program.


An experiment in sustainability: Change habits, not infrastructure
Campus Life
In the first schoolwide program of its kind on campus, the Graduate School of Education is intentionally creating a culture of conservation, changing the way people work and live in the school to become more sustainable.


No money to upgrade water infrastructure? Try this.
Science & Technology
Financing for water projects and aging infrastructure is critically needed but hard to come by. Stanford researchers highlight innovative approaches with a “Living Map” of case studies around the country.


Stanford students apply international justice knowledge in Cambodia
Teaching & Students
Three young women had a transformative experience through Stanford’s WSD Handa Center for Human Rights and International Justice, which sent them to monitor the ongoing genocide trial in Phnom Penh.  


EPA methane emission policy likely to cost less, miss 2025 targets Stanford researchers find
Science & Technology
Stanford research shows plugging methane leaks will cost about a third less than the EPA estimates, further underscoring the cost-effectiveness of emissions mitigation – but the agency will also likely fall short of its 2025 reduction targets.


From the classroom into the world
In the Spotlight
Global Studies internships in Cambodia give Stanford students life-changing experiences abroad in the field of human rights and international justice.


Eight minutes to online learning success
Social Sciences
Communication PhD candidate René Kizilcec is lead author of a study that examined the effectiveness of a psychological strategy on online learners. Noticeable differences along cultural lines could help millions of online learners overcome obstacles.


Sun + rooftop photovoltaic panels = electricity for Stanford
University Affairs
Stanford recently completed an ambitious project to increase its solar resources by installing rooftop photovoltaic systems that will generate 4.5 megawatts of power for the university.


Stanford musicologist brings the 15th century to life
Arts & Creativity
Stanford’s Jesse Rodin reanimates musical experiences of the distant past through performance.


Faculty Senate discusses federal research, transformation of career education
Faculty & Staff
The speakers at the April 13 meeting included President Marc Tessier-Lavigne; Provost Persis Drell; and Farouk Dey, dean of career education and associate vice provost for student affairs.


Stanford Mohr Visiting Artist Majel Connery reimagines the string quartet
Arts & Creativity
A team of visiting artists teach the theatricality of musical performance.  


Four Stanford faculty awarded Guggenheim Fellowships
Awards
Margaret Cohen, Bissera Pentcheva, Jesse Rodin and Tim Roughgarden received 2017 Guggenheim Fellowships.


Simulation shows how transporter proteins do their work in cells
Science & Technology
Cells must continually pass molecules in and out to sustain life. Computer scientists and molecular physiologists have developed a computer algorithm to capture how these crucial proteins work.


Educational farm hosts classes from across campus
Campus Life
Stanford Earth aims to draw more than 1,000 students from multiple majors for field learning every year at its working farm, complete with animals and crops.


Stanford junior wins 2017 Truman Scholarship for graduate studies
Awards
Alexis Kallen, who hopes to become a human rights lawyer, is one of 62 recipients of the scholarship, which provides up to $30,000 for graduate study – in the United States and abroad – to students who are committed to careers in public service.


Philosopher to deliver 2017 Tanner Lectures at Stanford
Campus Life
This year’s Tanner Lectures will feature Richard Kraut, the Charles and Emma Morrison Professor in the Humanities at Northwestern University.


Groundwater overuse cuts San Joaquin Valley’s water storage ability
Science & Technology
Over-pumping groundwater has drastically and permanently reduced the water storage capabilities of land in one of California’s most important farming areas.


Planning progresses for Stanford Redwood City
Faculty & Staff
Employee input is front and center as planning for interior design, transportation, IT connectivity and workplace culture at the new campus moves forward. A new "Working at Stanford Redwood City" website offers information and updates for employees.


American Academy of Arts and Sciences elects 11 Stanford faculty members
Faculty & Staff
Eleven members of the Stanford faculty have been elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the country’s oldest and most prestigious honorary learned societies.


Making Stanford’s Roble Hall sustainable for its second century
Campus Life
The historic Roble Hall houses a multifaceted program that focuses on hard questions, like how to get 300 students engaged daily and deeply with sustainability.


Stanford historian follows trail of mercenary European adventurers embarking on ‘Scramble for Africa’
Humanities
Steven Press uncovers an overlooked method of empire-building in the late 1800s that saw Europe make an indelible mark on Africa. Press documents these historic events in his new book.


Board of Trustees visits Harvard and MIT
University Affairs
During its April 2-5 meeting, trustees held their annual retreat in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where they heard presentations by leaders from Harvard and MIT, and learned more about Kendall Square, a nearby neighborhood with a vibrant and growing life sciences ecosystem.


New method for recording bird flight in 3D
Science & Technology
Researchers in the Lentink lab developed a new way to record wing shape during bird flight in 3D. This high-resolution, high-speed, automated reconstruction method could be applied to any studies of movement.


The Colorado at Bing Concert Hall
Arts & Creativity
Performances of the multimedia work The Colorado on April 21 and 22 conclude Stanford Live's Imagining the West series, which includes a conversation with National Geographic photographer Pete McBride.


The power of social approval on cooperation
Social Sciences
A new study shows that people who were encouraged to judge each other’s morals cooperated better in groups.


What is sustainability? A conversation with Stanford Earth Dean Pamela Matson
Science & Technology
Sustainability efforts today are critical to meet the needs of people now and over the long term, and Stanford has a leadership role.


New approach may accelerate design of high-power batteries
Science & Technology
New Stanford study describes a model for designing novel materials used in electrical storage devices, such as car batteries and capacitors. This approach may dramatically accelerate discovery of new materials that provide cheap and efficient ways to store energy.


The brain doesn’t navigate quite like a GPS
Science & Technology
Neuroscientists' discovery of grid cells, popularly known as the brain’s GPS, was hailed as a major discovery. But new results suggest the system is more complicated than anyone had guessed.


Stanford study explores risk of deforestation as agriculture expands in Africa
Law & Policy
Multinational companies are increasingly looking to Africa to expand production of in-demand commodity crops such as soy and oil palm. A first-of-its-kind study highlights the real and potential impacts on the continent’s valuable tropical forests.


Stanford expert suggests focusing on shared values rather than climate change
Law & Policy
Instead of talking about the polarized topic of climate change, Stanford Earth scientist Rob Jackson suggests focusing on the shared benefits of addressing the problem, including job creation, health and safety.


Stanford joins amicus brief opposing revised travel ban
Uncategorized
A group of 31 American universities, including Stanford, has filed a court brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit outlining the harm to the academic community from the March 6 executive order.


Alcohol policy check-in
University Affairs
Six months after new policies prohibiting large containers of hard liquor were established, statistics indicate a reduction in harmful alcohol-related incidents. Prevention programs have been expanded.


President, provost launch university-wide planning process
Faculty & Staff
Stanford’s long-range planning process, launched this month, seeks broad input to collaboratively create a shared vision for the university that anticipates future trends and identifies key opportunities.


Sociologists urge use of big data to study human interaction
Social Sciences
A group of Stanford experts are encouraging more researchers who study social interaction to conduct studies that examine online environments and use big data.


Avoiding deforestation as agriculture expands into Africa
Law & Policy
Multinational companies are increasingly looking to Africa to expand production of in-demand commodity crops such as soy and oil palm. A first-of-its-kind study highlights the real and potential impacts on the continent’s valuable tropical forests.


Stanford expert examines roots of America’s divide
Law & Policy
Stanford law expert Mugambi Jouet analyzes what has led to the current political divide in America and what separates the United States from other Western countries in a newly published book.


Deep learning algorithm could aid drug development
Science & Technology
Combining computer science and chemistry, researchers show how an advanced form of machine learning that works off small amounts of data can be used to solve problems in drug discovery.


NCAA semifinal photo blog
Uncategorized


Stanford offers admission to 2,050 students from around the world
Teaching & Students
The university announced today that 2,050 high school students have been admitted to the Class of 2021 from a pool of 44,073.


Students explore Esperanto across Europe
Humanities
In a research project spanning eight countries, two Stanford students search for Esperanto, a constructed language, against the backdrop of European populism.


President Trump’s environmental plan
Law & Policy
Law Professor Deborah Sivas answers questions about the president’s environmental vision and explains the Clean Power Plan and its significance.


Solutions for the rural west
Social Sciences
The Lane Center hosted the 5th Annual Eccles Family Rural West Conference gathering innovative leaders to tackle economic, social, health and environmental issues.


George Houle, Stanford professor of music emeritus and early music champion, dies at 89
Obituaries
Colleagues, friends and family will celebrate the life of George Houle at a memorial concert on Saturday, April 1.


Stanford microbiologist creates ‘resistor’ hats for the March for Science
Campus Life
Motivated by a love for science and a desire to encourage more evidence-based thinking, Heidi Arjes creates science-themed knitting designs. For the April 22 March for Science, she’s come up with a special project: the resistor hat.


Stanford Live features world-class artists, integrates them into campus life
Arts & Creativity
In its first five seasons, Stanford Live has made top performers part of university life. Under director Chris Lorway, the organization plans to expand its theme-based programming and “spill outside” of its home base, Bing Concert Hall.


New nano devices could withstand extreme environments of space
Science & Technology
Members of the Stanford XLab are creating nano-devices that can withstand the acid rains on Venus, radiation in space and the heat of car engines, improving research in these extreme environments.


Stanford education school celebrates 100 years
University Affairs
The school is planning a year of centennial programming and an interactive website to mark the milestone.


Where states rank on water rights transfers
Law & Policy
Stanford’s Water in the West program ranks states in the Colorado River Basin on their use of and support for a legal tool enabling water rights holders to voluntarily transfer their water to benefit the environment.


Cardinal advance to 13th Final Four
Campus Life
The Cardinal women's basketball team beat Notre Dame 76-75 to advance to the NCAA Final Four. Stanford came back from a 16-point deficit in the second half on the way to victory.


Keeping communities out of harm’s way in a changing climate
Law & Policy
Based on examples from around the world, researchers chart the landscape for whether and how to implement the strategy of managed retreat – relocation or abandonment of development in the face of extreme weather risks.


Stanford’s St. Lawrence String Quartet brings Beethoven to the San Francisco County Jail
Arts & Creativity
The St. Lawrence String Quartet, Stanford’s ensemble-in-residence, performed at the San Francisco County Jail, sharing classical music with inmates. One prisoner described the experience as “a drink of water in a desert of concrete.”


Stanford Community Police Academy teaches what it’s like to be a police officer
Campus Life
The Stanford Community Police Academy teaches members of the campus community what it's like to be a cop.


Satellite imaging breakthrough improves ability to measure plant growth
Science & Technology
Researchers have developed an approach for measuring plant growth from space by refining a decades-old technique. The new technology gets around earlier obstacles to accurate observations and could help unlock new perspectives on global change.


Stanford scientists study Pavlovian conditioning in neural networks
Science & Technology
By looking at groups of neurons in the emotional center of the brain, researchers now understand how neural networks in the brain form associations, like those made famous by Ivan Pavlov.


Introductory freshman seminar publishes paper on Zika
Science & Technology
Students in an infectious disease seminar quickly become Zika experts thanks to the epidemic’s sparse, rapidly changing history. In an unusual twist, their coursework culminated in a journal publication.


Adapting a DIY robot kit to fill test tubes
Science & Technology
Modern biology labs often use robotic assemblies to drop precise amounts of fluids into experimental containers. Now students and teachers can create inexpensive automated systems to do this in clubs or classrooms.


Stanford students praise new hands-on approach to archival research
Teaching & Students
Stanford students who experience a new archives-centric teaching approach stress the importance of exposure to primary historical materials for students of all disciplines.  


Heavy California rains par for the course for climate change
Science & Technology
Stanford climatologist Noah Diffenbaugh explains why heavy rains during a drought are to be expected for a state in the throes of climate change.


New study calls for U.S. solar policy reform
Science & Technology
Stanford researchers suggest reforming U.S. solar policies and encourage closer collaboration between the United States and China on solar energy in a new report.


Stanford women win NCAA swimming and diving title
Campus Life
Stanford claimed its first women's swimming and diving national title since 1998 on Saturday. This is Stanford's ninth NCAA women's swimming title and 10th overall, the most in the nation.


Stanford scientists find a previously unknown role for the cerebellum
Science & Technology
Researchers long believed that the cerebellum did little more than process our senses and control our muscles. New techniques to study the most densely packed neurons in our brains reveal that it may do much more.


Stanford women win first NCAA swimming and diving title since 1998
Campus Life
Stanford claimed its first women's swimming and diving national title since 1998 on Saturday. This is Stanford's ninth NCAA women's swimming title and 10th overall, the most in the nation.


Mapping the emotions of London
Humanities
A digital humanities team sifts through two centuries of British novels and geography to see how London’s readers felt about different parts of their city.


How grass developed a better way to breathe
Science & Technology
Grasses are better able to withstand drought or high temperatures than many other plants in large part due to changes in their pores, called stomata. Stanford scientists have discovered how grasses produce these altered pores, which could someday lead to crops that can better survive climate change.


Unexpected intersections: Interdisciplinary collaborations
In the Spotlight
At Stanford, far-flung collaborations blur traditional boundaries and open new avenues for discovery and expression.


Students recreate medieval feasts in new course
Humanities
As part of a new humanities course, undergraduate students replicate the recipes and the ambience of ancient feasts in order to learn about how people lived in the Middle Ages.


Stanford’s newest library opens in the former Old Chem
Science & Technology
The Robin Li and Melissa Ma Science Library combines biology, chemical engineering, chemistry, mathematics and statistics collections in a bright, relaxing space sprinkled with hints of the building’s history.


Early federal budget proposal stirs concern
University Affairs
Stanford leaders say an early outline of the White House's federal budget proposals is cause for concern – but the process is long, and the university will be working with partners to make a strong case for research and education.


Former Spelman president is 2017 Haas Center Distinguished Visitor
Campus Life
Beverly Daniel Tatum, former president of Spelman College, will spend spring quarter at Stanford as the Haas Center Distinguished Visitor. She will deliver the Haas Distinguished Visitor Lecture on April 5.


Navigating the guts of an ancient submarine canyon
Science & Technology
Tourists flock to Point Lobos State Natural Reserve near Monterey, California, for its breathtaking coastal views. But the site has long attracted geologists for a very different reason.


Stanford scientists create three-dimensional bladder reconstruction
Science & Technology
Advanced computer imaging technology has created a three-dimensional computer reconstruction of a patient’s bladder. The technique, which works on any hollow organ, could help doctors locate tumors or other disorders and prepare for surgery.


Stanford Middle Plaza project to revitalize vacant car lots in Menlo Park
University Affairs
The long-awaited project moves closer to construction as Stanford works with the city of Menlo Park to transform a key location into a vibrant mix of housing, offices and retail, with enhanced public amenities.


Stanford hosts women of color who aspire to academic careers
Social Sciences
Stanford recently welcomed more than four dozen women to campus from around the country for “Women of Color in the Academy – Staying Fit: Mind, Body, and Soul.”


Stanford’s trove of electronic theses, dissertations tops 5,000
Campus Life
Most Stanford students submit theses and dissertations electronically under a free program established by Stanford University Libraries and the Office of the University Registrar.


Greg Boardman to retire at the end of the academic year
Faculty & Staff
Boardman, who has led Stanford’s Student Affairs division for more than a decade, has distinguished himself as a collaborative leader, working closely with individual students, student organizations and academic units across campus to enhance community engagement and student well-being.


Mapping seawater threat to California Central Coast aquifers
Science & Technology
Professor Rosemary Knight and PhD student Meredith Goebel use Earth-imaging technologies to study the intrusion of saltwater into freshwater aquifers along the California coast.


As Moore’s law ends, brain-like computers begin
Science & Technology
Conventional computer chips aren’t up to the challenges posed by next-generation autonomous drones and medical implants. Now, Kwabena Boahen has laid out a way forward, using ideas built in to our brains.


Justice Sonia Sotomayor speaks at Stanford
Campus Life
Sonia Sotomayor, who became a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in 2009, spoke about the importance of broad education and charity at Stanford Memorial Auditorium.


Faculty Senate approves task force to promote a broad education; discusses first-year student experience, programs
Faculty & Staff
Speakers at the meeting included Professor Russell Berman, chair of the Planning and Policy Board and director of Thinking Matters and Introductory Seminars, and Professor Sarah Church, senior associate vice provost for undergraduate education and member of the Coordinated First Year Review Committee.


Stretchy electrode paves way for flexible electronics
Science & Technology
Paving the way for flexible electronics, Stanford chemical engineers have developed a plastic electrode that stretches like rubber but carries electricity like wires.


Looking at rural debt through the eyes of India’s farmers
Social Sciences
A Stanford researcher in India asks: Why are so many farmers trapped in debt? And what can be done about it?


Stanford Libraries obtain collection on giant sequoias
Humanities
A new collection obtained by Stanford University Libraries offers an extensive look at the time of the discovery and exhibitions of California’s giant sequoia trees.


The aesthetics of sexuality in Victorian novels
Humanities
In Queen Victoria’s England, novelists lodged erotic innuendo in descriptive passages for characters to express sexual desire.


Law Professor William Koski to receive Roland Volunteer Service Prize
Faculty & Staff
Law Professor William Koski will receive the Haas Center for Public Service’s Miriam Aaron Roland Volunteer Service Prize, which annually recognizes faculty who engage students in integrating academic scholarship with significant and meaningful volunteer service to society.


Poetry scholar, translator John Felstiner dies
Faculty & Staff
John Felstiner, professor emeritus of English and a recipient of the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism, wrote until he no longer could because of aphasia. He died Feb. 24 at 80.


Stanford scholars analyze Trump’s travel ban
Law & Policy
President Trump signed a revised executive order Monday limiting immigration from six Muslim-majority countries. Stanford scholars examine the executive order and whether it can withstand judicial scrutiny.


Cold War from the African American perspective
Humanities
Stanford literary scholar Vaughn Rasberry illuminates a body of work by black writers who spotlighted cultural contradictions during the Cold War.


Stanford provides information, support to international and immigrant communities
Law & Policy
As the federal administration pursues new directives on immigration enforcement and international travel, the university continues a range of efforts to inform and support the Stanford community.


U.S. grasslands affected more by atmospheric aridity than by rain
Science & Technology
According to 33 years of remote sensing data, productivity of U.S. grasslands is more sensitive to dryness of the atmosphere than precipitation, important information for understanding how ecosystems will respond to climate change.


Stanford hosts Rolston String Quartet
Arts & Creativity
Stanford’s Azure Family Concert series and the St. Lawrence String Quartet continue to bring the best emerging quartets to campus.


Stanford enhances its focus on mental health
Campus Life
As part of Wellness Week, three campus health professionals, including Jim Jacobs, executive director of Vaden Health Center, describe ways the university is enhancing its responsiveness to ensure people in distress get the help they need.


Three Stanford faculty elected to the National Academy of Engineering
Awards
Andrea Goldsmith and engineering faculty colleagues Rodney Ewing and Leonidas Guibas are among 84 new members of the NAE.


President, provost answer questions during informal meeting with university community
Campus Life
President Marc Tessier-Lavigne and Provost Persis Drell answered a range of questions on issues from housing availability to the importance of the humanities during a town hall meeting Monday.


Pamela Matson to step down as Stanford Earth dean
Faculty & Staff
The scope of research and teaching at the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences greatly expanded under Matson, one of the university’s longest serving deans.


Stanford, PAUSD and PACCC collaborate on solutions for before- and after-school child care
Faculty & Staff
Agreement will facilitate the purchase, installation and setup of a second modular classroom to house a popular before- and after-school program at Escondido Elementary School.


TAPS Undergraduate Acting Program: The Tempest behind the scenes
Arts & Creativity
Stanford Theater & Performance Studies presents William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, in conjunction with the TAPS Undergraduate Acting Program. A slideshow provides a look behind the scenes.


Vouchers do not improve student achievement, Stanford researcher finds
Social Sciences
Education professor Martin Carnoy analyzed 25 years of research and found that voucher programs do not significantly improve test scores. Carnoy says vouchers distract from proven policies and programs with proven impact on test scores and graduation rates.


Stanford president, provost answer questions during informal meeting with university’s community
Campus Life
President Marc Tessier-Lavigne and Provost Persis Drell answered a range of questions on issues from housing availability to transportation during a town hall meeting Monday.


Stanford shines under sun and smiles on Family Weekend
Campus Life
Nearly 4,000 family members visited Stanford over the weekend to roam the grounds, sample college life and, most of all, spend time with their students. University photographer Linda Cicero captured some of the moments.


Stanford affirms commitment to military veterans with expanded benefits, programs
Campus Life
Stanford has expanded academic, social and cultural programs for U.S. military veterans and active-duty service members, says Dustin Noll, specialist in the Office for Military-Affiliated Communities, and recently established a new policy that financially benefits veterans who receive VA educational benefits.


New tool reduces risk of triggering manmade earthquakes
Science & Technology
A new software tool can help reduce the risk of triggering manmade earthquakes by calculating the probability that oil and gas production activities will trigger slip in nearby faults.


Experts urge more research on people’s mindsets
Social Sciences
Stanford scholars, including psychology professor Alia Crum, encourage more healthcare professionals to place emphasis on the importance of people’s mindsets and social context in healing.


Computer scientist Jennifer Widom named dean of Stanford School of Engineering
Faculty & Staff
Widom, an innovator in engineering education, taught one of Stanford’s first MOOCs.


Stanford’s new initiatives highlight Iran’s art, culture
Arts & Creativity
Over the past several years, the Stanford Iranian Studies Program has focused on bringing important Iranian artists to Stanford and building awareness of Iran’s art history and culture through new programs and classes.


Stanford chemist John Ross dies at 90
Obituaries
John Ross, a professor of chemistry at Stanford and recipient of the National Medal of Science, was a forward-thinking researcher known also for his humor and wisdom. He passed away after a brief illness on Feb. 18 at the age of 90.


Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor to speak at Stanford
Campus Life
Sonia Sotomayor, who joined the U.S. Supreme Court in 2009, will converse with Stanford Law School Dean Mary Elizabeth Magill in Memorial Auditorium on March 10. The event is open only to faculty, staff and students.  


Faculty Senate hears Title IX update
Faculty & Staff
At the Feb. 23 Faculty Senate meeting, Catherine Glaze, Title IX coordinator, and Pamela Karlan, chair of the Advisory Committee on Sexual Assault Policies and Practices, presented reports on Stanford’s Pilot Student Title IX Process.


Faculty Senate hears reports on campus climate, Stanford Earth
Faculty & Staff
The speakers at the Feb. 23 meeting included President Marc Tessier-Lavigne and Pamela Matson, dean of the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. At the meeting the senate passed a resolution to establish a Residential Programs Faculty Board, and Hans Weiler, academic secretary, encouraged faculty to vote in the election for the 2017-18 senate, which ends at midnight.


The moral element of climate change
Humanities
Stanford doctoral candidate Blake Francis hopes to create a framework that governments could use to evaluate their climate change policies and consider when it’s morally justified for them to emit greenhouse gases.


The unsung hero of science: Assessment
Science & Technology
Assessment of complex issues like climate change adds enormous value to the scientific landscape, creating foundations for government and society. But the process isn’t always easy, says climate scientist Katharine Mach.


Iranian Studies Program cultivates student’s passion for history
Humanities
As an undergraduate in the Iranian Studies Program, Anna Polishchuk translated top-secret documents from the Soviet Union as she researched the relationship between Iran’s pro-communist groups and the Soviets during the 1979 Iranian Revolution.


President Tessier-Lavigne outlines what is important
Campus Life
A commitment to service, a dedication to help new students make the most of their opportunities and an aspiration to take Stanford to even greater heights were among the themes outlined by President Marc Tessier-Lavigne during his “What Matters to Me and Why” talk.


Stanford Family Weekend opens Friday
Campus Life
Stanford is rolling out the welcome mat for an estimated 4,000 visitors attending Family Weekend 2017, a two-day event that begins tomorrow.


New research: Toddlers’ grammar skills are learned, not innate
Social Sciences
Stanford psychologist Michael Frank and other researchers used a novel statistical approach to analyze children’s early speech and found evidence that toddlers develop knowledge of grammar with time and practice.  


Brain-computer interface advance allows fast, accurate typing by people with paralysis
brain research
In a Stanford-led research report, three participants with movement impairment controlled an onscreen cursor simply by imagining their own hand movements.


California State Supreme Court Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar will be 2017 Commencement speaker at Stanford
Teaching & Students
Stanford’s 126th Commencement Weekend, June 16-18, will feature a graduation address by California State Supreme Court Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar and a Baccalaureate address by Children’s Defense Fund president Marian Wright Edelman.


Nobel Prize-winner Kenneth Arrow dies
Faculty & Staff
Nobel Prize-winning economist Kenneth Arrow was a leading figure in the field of economic theory. He inspired generations of students through his decades-long teaching at Stanford.


Brain scans predict at-risk teens’ drug use two years later
Social Sciences
Impulsive behavior in teens can go hand in hand with drug use, but the link is weak and doesn’t necessarily predict future behavior. A Stanford psychologist and colleagues think they can do better, using images of the brain.


The threat from within
University Affairs
Former Provost John Etchemendy, in a recent speech before the Stanford Board of Trustees, outlined challenges higher education is facing in the coming years. Following is an excerpt from that talk.


Artificial synapse for neural networks
Science & Technology
A new organic artificial synapse made by Stanford researchers could support computers that better recreate the way the human brain processes information. It could also lead to improvements in brain-machine technologies.


Minuscule nanostraws sample a cell’s contents without damage
Science & Technology
Tiny nanostraws that sample the contents of a cell without causing damage may improve our ability to understand cellular processes and lead to safer medical treatments


Glowing mice suggest new gene therapy technique
Science & Technology
A collaboration between chemists and gene therapy experts produced a new way of inserting the code for modified proteins into the cells of mice. If successful in humans, the technique could be useful for vaccines or cancer therapies.


Stanford Catalyst for Collaborative Solutions focuses on 10 global challenges
Faculty & Staff
The Stanford Catalyst for Collaborative Solutions plans to award $12 million to four interdisciplinary teams, each committed to working in collaboration on projects that will make headway on one of 10 global challenges.


Uranium from seawater factors into nuclear power
Science & Technology
As the world shifts from fossil fuels, additional sources of energy-on-demand will be needed to make up for lulls in wind or solar. A new way of extracting uranium from seawater could help even countries without uranium mines harness nuclear power in the post-carbon energy future.


Letter to students from Provost Persis Drell
University Affairs
Provost Persis Drell sent the following letter to students on Feb. 17, 2017.


Q&A with Stanford experts puts Oroville Dam breach in context
Science & Technology
As workers rush to repair the spillway at California’s Oroville Dam, Stanford researchers comment on how challenges like climate change and aging infrastructure heighten risks for California.


Trustees approve 2017-18 tuition and reaffirm Stanford’s financial aid commitment
Teaching & Students
Under Stanford’s undergraduate financial aid program, typical parents with incomes below $125,000 pay no tuition, and those with incomes below $65,000 pay no tuition, mandatory fees, room or board.


Stanford experts offer policy proposals, insights on U.S.-Asia relations
Social Sciences
A new report from Stanford’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center suggests that aspects of the Trans-Pacific Partnership should be retained when negotiating new bilateral agreements.


Revised Escondido Village housing project receives approval
Campus Life
Working to expand on-campus housing opportunities, the university is moving ahead with plans to construct a new Escondido Village residential complex for graduate students.  


H. Pierre Noyes, theoretical physicist and antiwar activist, dies at 92
Faculty & Staff
Pierre Noyes, who was the first director of the Theory Group at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (now SLAC), was an ardent opponent of the Vietnam War.


Q&A with Lauren Schoenthaler clarifies recent questions about the Title IX process
University Affairs
Lauren Schoenthaler, senior associate vice provost, clarifies recent questions and concerns about how Stanford adjudicates sexual assault.


Personalized virtual reality displays match eyesight
Science & Technology
Researchers are developing a type of virtual reality display that adapts to differences in how we see depending on whether we need glasses or how old we are. This technology could reduce headaches or nausea caused by existing VR headsets.


Stanford researchers measure African farm yields using high-resolution satellites
Science & Technology
By using high-res images taken by the latest generation of compact satellites, Stanford scientists have developed a new capability for estimating crop yields from space.


Stanford joins amicus brief opposing travel ban
University Affairs
A group of 17 American universities, including Stanford, has filed a court brief outlining the harm to the academic community from the Jan. 27 executive order.  


Old county jail rediscovered on Stanford land
Campus Life
Biologists and archaeologists hoping to improve the lives of threatened species rediscover remnants of the facility for petty criminals on Old Page Mill Road. The rediscovery of the jail surprised even long-time university archeologist Laura Jones.


Two Stanford alumni awarded 2017 Gates Cambridge Scholarships
Awards
The Stanford alums are among the 36 Americans awarded scholarship to pursue graduate studies at the University of Cambridge in England.


Stanford researchers among those discussing the future of conservation
Science & Technology
The world is changing too fast for nature to keep up. Conservation scholars, including those at Stanford, agree that strategies need to evolve to consider not only how ecosystems operated in past decades and centuries, but also thousands and millions of years ago.


Getting help and support
Faculty & Staff
This page offers resources to members of the Stanford community seeking support and assistance related to the Jan. 27 executive order on refugees and travel, and other issues of concern to our international and immigrant communities.


Faculty Senate addresses immigration issues, Stanford’s long-range planning effort
Faculty & Staff
Speakers at Thursday’s meeting included President Marc Tessier-Lavigne; Provost Persis Drell; M. Elizabeth Magill, dean of Stanford Law School; Elizabeth Bernhardt, professor of German studies; Mehran Sahami, professor (teaching) of computer science; and Christine Alfano, associate director of the Program in Writing and Rhetoric.


Stanford faculty named in first cohort of Chan Zuckerberg Biohub investigators
Science & Technology
The 19 scientists will work toward curing, preventing and managing disease while hastening the pace of discovery.


Stanford Radio on SiriusXM features ‘living room conversations’ with faculty
Science & Technology
The satellite radio company will begin broadcasting two new programs featuring Stanford faculty members – as hosts and guests – on its “Insight Channel.” Education lecturer Denise Pope co-hosts School’s In.


Stanford’s Women in Data Science conference reaches worldwide audience
Science & Technology
Thousands of women around the globe participated in a conference bringing together female data scientists. The event inspired and connected participants as well as providing a technical forum.


U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg talks about a meaningful life
Campus Life
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, delivered the Rathbun Lecture on a Meaningful Life on Monday at Stanford Memorial Church.


Stanford engineers create a low-cost battery for storing renewable energy
Science & Technology
A new low-cost, high-performance battery could provide an inexpensive storage solution for solar power, which is abundant during the day but must be stored for use at night.  


Knight-Hennessy Scholars program identifies admission criteria
Teaching & Students
The Knight-Hennessy Scholars program is beginning a global recruitment effort to identify promising prospective graduate students from a wide range of backgrounds and nationalities.


Stanford students recreate 5,000-year-old Chinese beer recipe
Humanities
Students brewed an ancient beer during class with Stanford archaeologist Li Liu, who discovered evidence of earliest beer-making in China as part of her recent research.


Stanford researchers aim to create global conversations about long, healthy living
Social Sciences
The Stanford Center on Longevity’s new, interactive website is designed to further research and to encourage officials, entrepreneurs and members of the public to think about ways of redesigning the human life.


Stanford research shows that anyone can become an Internet troll
Science & Technology
Three methods of research find that the situation in which an online discussion occurs influences whether people will troll more than their personal past of trolling suggests.


Women’s basketball coach Tara VanDerveer wins 1,000th
athletics
In her 31st year at Stanford, Tara VanDerveer on Friday became just the third coach in Division 1 NCAA basketball history to reach 1,000 wins.


Current international travel guidance
Uncategorized


New analysis suggests ways for landowners to limit fracking and mineral extraction without regulations
Science & Technology
An analysis by experts in Earth science and environmental law at Stanford and other institutions proposes creating underground easements to allow private landowners to restrict hydraulic fracturing and mining.


Stanford alum returns to campus as visiting artist to explore connections between his art and other disciplines
Arts & Creativity
Sculptor Will Clift creates multiple intersections with a range of disciplines, including dance and music in a multimedia production in Bing Concert Hall’s Gunn Atrium.


Stanford implements measures to further protect employee tax information
Faculty & Staff
Financial Management Services has enhanced protection of employee tax information and, in coordination with the university’s Information Security Office, suggests ways that employees can further protect themselves from fraud and identity theft.


China to protect areas of high ecological importance identified by Stanford researchers
Science & Technology
Stanford's Gretchen Daily and Zhiyun Ouyang of the Chinese Academy of Science are among co-authors of a report on areas of China that deserve protection because of their high ecological importance.


Voting for 50th Senate of the Academic Council begins at midnight Feb. 3
Faculty & Staff
It’s time for members of the Academic Council to vote for next year’s Faculty Senate and to nominate full professors to fill vacancies on the Advisory Board.


Q&A with Provost Persis Drell
University Affairs
As she takes office as provost, Persis Drell shares her thoughts on her new role, the Stanford community and the university’s future.


Substance in crude oil harms fish hearts, could affect humans as well
Science & Technology
Exposure to oil can cause severe cardiovascular effects in fish. Experiments provide direct evidence of how phenanthrene, an oil pollutant found in water, air and soil, causes irregular heartbeat and weaker contractions of heart cells.


Large marine protected areas effectively protect reef shark populations, Stanford scientists find
Science & Technology
Researchers at Stanford’s Hopkins Marine Station find that expanded marine protected areas are successful in limiting fishing and increasing reef shark populations.


Stanford principles regarding immigration
University Affairs
As events continue to unfold regarding federal immigration policy, a website has been created where Stanford leaders summarize the principles of the university’s support for international and undocumented community members. Also found on the site are links to resources for the Stanford community.


Action is needed to make stagnant carbon dioxide emissions fall
Science & Technology
2016 marked the third year in a row when global CO2 emissions remained relatively flat, but actual declines won’t materialize without advances in technology and growth in renewables.


Rat-grown mouse pancreases help reverse diabetes in mice
Medicine
Growing organs from one species in the body of another may one day relieve transplant shortages. Now Stanford researchers show that islets from rat-grown mouse pancreases can reverse disease when transplanted into diabetic mice.


Stanford’s support for our international and undocumented community
University Affairs
As events continue to unfold regarding federal immigration policy, Stanford leaders summarize the principles of the university's support for international and undocumented community members. Additional campus events and initiatives also are planned.


Stanford experts on President Trump and the media
Humanities
Reflecting on the transfer of power to President Donald Trump, Stanford scholars discuss his style of communication and relationship with the media.


President’s comments on immigration issues at Faculty Senate
University Affairs
Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne made comments at the Faculty Senate meeting on Thursday, January 26, 2017.


Community letter from Stanford leadership on immigration
University Affairs
Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne, Provost John Etchemendy and incoming Provost Persis Drell issued the following statement.


Faculty Senate discusses support for undocumented students, liberal arts at Stanford
Faculty & Staff
Speakers at the Jan. 26 meeting included President Marc Tessier-Lavigne, Provost John Etchemendy, Professor Russell Berman and Professor Andrew Fire.


Faculty Senate discusses support for undocumented students, the liberal arts at Stanford, new IT privacy policy
Faculty & Staff
The speakers at the Jan. 26 senate meeting included President Marc Tessier-Lavigne; Provost John Etchemendy; Professor Russell Berman, chair of the Planning and Policy Board; and Professor Andrew Fire, chair of the Ad Hoc Faculty Committee on IT Security and Privacy.


Commitment to reforms paves way for Stanford Band resumption
Campus Life
Stanford Provost John Etchemendy is replacing a previously announced Stanford Band suspension with a pathway for the Band to resume activities as a student-run organization.


A new brain mapping technique reveals circuitry of Parkinson’s disease tremors
Science & Technology
The new technique probes the neural pathways that cause these tremors, and also provides a way to map and troubleshoot other circuits in the whole brain.


Artificial intelligence used to identify skin cancer
Science & Technology
In hopes of creating better access to medical care, Stanford researchers have trained an algorithm to diagnose skin cancer.


Stanford expert addresses international trade and the TPP
International
Stanford Law School Professor Alan O. Sykes addresses the future of international trade and the Trans-Pacific Partnership under the new administration.


Stanford law professor discusses revival of Keystone and Dakota pipelines
Law & Policy
Q&A with environmental law expert Deborah Sivas.


Stanford electrical engineering senior wins Churchill Scholarship
Awards
The goal of the Churchill Scholarships program, established at the request of Sir Winston Churchill, is to advance science and technology on both sides of the Atlantic, helping to ensure future prosperity and security.


Stanford’s 2017 Bunyan Lecture: exploring the universe with gravitational waves
Science & Technology
In tonight's annual lecture, astrophysicist Rainer Weiss will reveal how research in gravitational wave detection can answer questions about the universe.


A philosopher at the helm of Stanford’s Faculty Senate
Campus Life
Debra Satz, a professor of philosophy, senior associate dean for the humanities and arts, and chair of the 2016-17 Faculty Senate, has long been a champion of the humanities, equity issues and faculty governance on the Farm.


Stanford historian uncovers a grim correlation between violence and inequality over the millennia
Humanities
Professor Walter Scheidel examines the history of peace and economic inequality over the past 10,000 years.


Provost John Etchemendy leaves remarkable legacy
University Affairs
John Etchemendy, Stanford’s longest-serving provost, leaves a legacy featuring a strengthened academic program, a modernized campus, an unrivaled financial aid program and a culture of collaboration that will last for years.


Stanford arts leadership capitalizes on Arts Initiative momentum
Arts & Creativity
Harry Elam and Matthew Tiews are taking the arts to the next level.


Reinvigorating community: An Inauguration Day gathering at Stanford
Campus Life
The Stanford community gathered in Memorial Church to affirm the university’s and the nation’s founding values through reflection, music and dance.


Prepared remarks by Persis Drell at the ‘Reinvigorating Community: An Inauguration Day Gathering’ event
Uncategorized
Text of remarks by Persis Drell, who will become provost on Feb. 1, at the Stanford community gathering in Memorial Church on Inauguration Day.


Brief interventions help online learners persist with coursework
Social Sciences
New research shows people in underdeveloped parts of the world are not as likely to complete massive open online courses, or MOOCs. But small psychological activities could help motivate them, closing the global achievement gap.


Bacterial discovery solves 20-year-old molecular paleontology mystery
Science & Technology
A fatty molecule once thought to be unique to flowering plants has turned up in bacteria skimmed from the Adriatic Sea and may provide biotech insights.


Empathy, respect for one another critical to ease political polarization, Stanford sociologist says
Social Sciences
The key to bridging the broad ideological division in the United States is for both sides to work on understanding the core values that the other holds dear.


At SIEPR, Yellen warns against running a “hot” economy
Social Sciences
Janet Yellen, chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, visited the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research to discuss “The Economic Outlook and Conduct of Monetary Policy.”


A way forward on health care reform
Social Sciences
Congress is moving to end the Affordable Care Act. Economist Alain Enthoven, an expert on health care finance, offers what should happen next.


Nanoscale view of energy storage
Science & Technology
Through long shifts at the helm of a highly sophisticated microscope, researchers at Stanford recorded reactions at near-atomic-scale resolution. Their success is another step toward building a better battery.


Wearable sensors can tell when you are getting sick
Science & Technology
New research from geneticist Michael Snyder and colleagues shows that fitness monitors and other wearable biosensors can tell when an individual’s heart rate, skin temperature and other measures are abnormal, suggesting possible illness.


Study finds gains for minority students but English learners still lag
Social Sciences
Researchers from Stanford and the Economic Policy Institute say black, Hispanic and Asian students have made gains compared to their white peers but socioeconomic factors still hold students back.


Stanford physicist suggests looking for dark matter in unusual places
Science & Technology
Most experiments searching for mysterious dark matter require massive colliders, but Stanford physicist Peter Graham advocates a different, less costly approach.


Letter to the Stanford community from President Marc Tessier-Lavigne
Faculty & Staff
The president describes two new initiatives to expand his opportunities for interaction with members of the campus community.


Stanford expert speaks on the role public understanding of science played in this election and may play in the future
Law & Policy
We’re living in a golden age of science communication, but too many people are missing out, says Thomas Hayden, director of the master’s degree program in environmental communications.


Carl Weber, Stanford professor emeritus of drama and a protégé of director Bertolt Brecht, dies at 91
Arts & Creativity
Carl Weber was a treasured mentor at Stanford, as well as a cutting-edge director who brought German experimental theater to America.


Harry Elam appointed vice president for the arts and senior vice provost for education at Stanford University
Faculty & Staff


Megan Pierson appointed chief of staff to President Tessier-Lavigne
Faculty & Staff


Inspired by a whirligig toy, Stanford bioengineers develop a 20-cent, hand-powered blood centrifuge
Science & Technology
Stanford bioengineers have developed an ultra-low-cost, human-powered blood centrifuge. With rotational speeds of up to 125,000 revolutions per minute, the device separates blood plasma from red cells in 1.5 minutes, no electricity required.


Letter to the Stanford community from Provost John Etchemendy
Campus Life
Provost John Etchemendy addresses several Title IX issues including the Stanford Band.


Stanford researchers explore legacy of Tuskegee syphilis study today
Science & Technology
Researchers have found that the disclosure of the infamous Tuskegee syphilis study in 1972 is correlated with increases in medical mistrust and mortality among African-American men. Their subsequent Oakland project seeks to better understand African-American wariness of medicine and health care providers.


Good news, bad news about parking on campus
Faculty & Staff
Q&A with Brian Shaw, director of Parking & Transportation Services.


New teaching approach brings more students into Stanford’s archives
Humanities
Stanford faculty and librarians are working together to modify the curriculum of large undergraduate courses to bring more students to the special collections and archives of the libraries on campus.


Stanford study shows development of face recognition entails brain tissue growth
Science & Technology
A central tenet in neuroscience has been that the amount of brain tissue goes in one direction throughout our lives – from too much to just enough. A new study finds that in some cases the brain can add tissue as well.


Police investigating appearance of symbols assumed to represent swastikas
University Affairs


What is the future of the U.S.-China relationship?
Social Sciences
Questions arise in advance of the incoming administration of Donald Trump; Stanford experts offer their perspective.


When force becomes the easy option
Social Sciences
As the U.S. military has become leaner, cheaper and less white, it’s more likely to be used as a tool of foreign policy, says Stanford historian David Kennedy. View Q&A with David Kennedy (PDF)


Popping the filter bubble
Social Sciences
The rise of filter bubbles and un-civil discourse on social media demands a stronger ethos of responsibility on the part of media platforms and all consumers of information, says Jim Steyer, CEO of Common Sense Media.


Year in review
Uncategorized


Stanford experts debate future of U.S.-China relationship
Law & Policy
Questions arise in advance of the incoming administration of Donald Trump.


Questions and responses to the New York Times article of December 29, 2016
Uncategorized


Stanford program brings science mentors to San Jose high school
Science & Technology
Stanford graduate students and postdoctoral scholars are helping Andrew P. Hill High School students grow their interests in science through mentorship and project-based learning.


New Stanford project will study development of Iran’s economy
Humanities
The Iranian Studies Program at Stanford launched a new initiative, called Stanford Iran 2040 Project, that will produce research and analyses on Iran’s economy.  


In Stanford study, worms dine on nanoparticles to help test biological force sensor technology
Science & Technology
A biologist and a materials scientist have teamed up to unravel the biological forces at play within our bodies. The first phase: feeding nanoparticles to worms.


Researchers at Stanford, SLAC use world’s smallest diamonds to make wires three atoms wide
Science & Technology
Scientists at Stanford and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered a way to use diamondoids – the smallest possible bits of diamond – to assemble atoms into the thinnest possible electrical wires, just three atoms wide.


Stanford University statement on New York Times story of Dec. 29, 2016
University Affairs
Stanford describes its extensive efforts to address sexual assault and responds to inaccuracies in the New York Times.


Stanford experts highlight link between language and race in new book
Humanities
Language is one of the most important cultural means that people have for shaping their identity. A new field called raciolinguistics explores this relationship between language and race.


Researchers at Stanford, SLAC Researchers use world’s smallest diamonds to make wires three atoms wide
Science & Technology
Scientists at Stanford and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered a way to use diamondoids – the smallest possible bits of diamond – to assemble atoms into the thinnest possible electrical wires, just three atoms wide.


Making spirits bright at Stanford
Campus Life
Before many head home for the holidays, members of the Stanford community enjoy the season's traditions with music and fun.


Stanford analysis reveals faults in U.S. government’s coal leasing program
Law & Policy
The U.S. government sells coal mined on federal lands at bargain rates, losing valuable revenue and hurting efforts to reduce greenhouse gases. Stanford scientists recommend significant changes.


Sidney Drell, theoretical physicist and national security expert at Stanford, dies at 90
Obituaries
Champion of nuclear nonproliferation, former deputy director of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and winner of numerous prestigious awards, Sidney Drell was a groundbreaking researcher and outstanding leader who wanted to make the world a better place.


Unexamined risks from tar sands oil may threaten oceans
Law & Policy
A lack of publicly available information about the chemical composition of fuel mined from tar sands hampers efforts to safeguard marine habitats. A new analysis recommends that officials gain a better understanding of the fuel’s environmental impacts before setting regulations.


Messages from the middle class
Social Sciences
Those surprised by the 2016 election outcomes had ignored widespread middle-class concerns about inequality, economic opportunity and frustration with Washington, D.C., says Stanford political science Professor Rob Reich.


Meet Our Faculty
Faculty & Staff
Scholarship is at its best when it draws upon a diverse community. When individuals are exposed to novel perspectives from a broader group, their thoughts become more creative, and they generate innovative solutions they might not have otherwise considered. Here, Stanford faculty members share their breadth of life experiences and interests that fuel the dynamic learning environment on campus.


A media mea culpa
Social Sciences
The media focused too much on polls, data and the “bright, shining comments of the day” rather than on the voices of the people and the candidates’ policies, says Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus.


Hubert R. Marshall, longtime political science teacher at Stanford, dies at 96
Faculty & Staff
A passionate teacher and civil rights proponent, Marshall taught a popular Stanford class on American public policy for more than three decades and served on selection committees for Rhodes, Truman and Marshall scholarships.


Stanford seeking a new home for overseas studies in China, searching for a new director for Cape Town program
Uncategorized
The Bing Overseas Studies Program, which offers programs in 10 locations around the world, recently announced changes to its programs in Beijing and in Cape Town, South Africa.


Starfish larvae create complex water whorls to eat and run
Science & Technology
Tiny starfish larvae employ a complex and previously unknown survival mechanism involving whorls of water that either bring food to them or speed them away to better feeding grounds.


Stanford women’s volleyball team wins seventh NCAA title in program history
athletics
Sixth-seeded Stanford completed its championship run with a 3-1 (25-21, 25-19, 18-25, 25-21) victory against fourth-seeded Texas on Saturday night at Nationwide Arena.


What is the future of the EPA?
Law & Policy
Environmental law experts Deborah Sivas and Michael Wara discuss the future of the Environmental Protection Agency under the president-elect’s pick to head the agency, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt.


How do we keep GPS safe from hackers, asks Stanford engineer
Science & Technology
A professor of aeronautics and astronautics says hackers could wreak havoc on highways, airways and sea lanes if we?re not careful


Reimagining work
Social Sciences
The new president will need to address the changing nature of work, including more portable and universal benefits, says Natalie Foster, a strategy advisor to the Aspen Institute.


Stanford women teach high school girls to code
Teaching & Students
Founded in 2012, Girls Teaching Girls to Code is a student-led organization that introduces Bay Area high school girls to computer science and programming basics.


Stanford’s new East Asian Studies major adds Korean track
Humanities
Stanford’s Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures has transformed its major to be more inclusive of Korea, a country that is increasingly on the minds of American youth.


Six-minute cellphone call improves student enrollment, teacher attendance in Pakistan, Stanford study finds
Humanities
Education researchers examining a World Bank community engagement program noted its positive impact, but results varied for boys’ and girls’ schools.


No more burning batteries? Stanford scientists turn to AI to create safer lithium-ion batteries
Science & Technology
Researchers have identified 21 solid materials that could replace flammable liquid electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries, improving the safety of electronic devices like cell phones and laptops.


Professor Robert Gordon on president-elect Trump’s business holdings, ethics, and the law
Election 2016
As an international businessman with holdings and interests across the country and globe, president-elect Donald Trump begins his transition to the White House with business conflicts of interest and ethical questions unresolved.


Methane from food production could be wildcard in combating climate change, Stanford scientist says
Science & Technology
Reports co-authored by Stanford Earth scientist show concentrations of methane approaching an internationally recognized worst-case scenario and highlight opportunities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture and fossil fuel use.


DNA in wastewater could provide clues to help community health, Stanford researchers say
Science & Technology
Stanford Bio-X researchers are developing methods for monitoring of DNA in wastewater, which could enable early detection of disease and discovery of previously undetected pathogens.


Stanford senior wins 2017 Marshall Scholarship for graduate study
Awards
Alina Utrata, a senior majoring in history and the law, with a minor in human rights, will pursue a master’s degree in conflict transformation and social justice at Queen’s University Belfast in Northern Ireland as a 2017 Marshall Scholar.


University statement on the Stanford Band
University Affairs
Seeking to achieve sustained reforms, Stanford is temporarily suspending activities of the Stanford Band and initiating a process to develop a new organizational structure for it.


Information for the Stanford community about Jane Doe lawsuit
University Affairs
Answer to the Complaint, Dec. 8, 2016


Questions and answers on current issues in sexual assault cases
University Affairs
This document provides a brief overview of the facts in response to some of the misleading information that has been circulated.


Roeland Nusse wins $3 million Breakthrough Prize
Awards
The developmental biologist was honored for helping to decode how Wnt signaling proteins affect embryonic development, cancer and the activity of tissue-specific adult stem cells that repair damage after injury or disease.


What are the ethical obligations of U.S. presidents?
Law & Policy
Legal historian and ethics expert Robert W. Gordon discusses potential challenges facing President-elect Donald Trump, a businessman with holdings and interests across the country and around the globe.


Today’s children face tough prospects of being better off than their parents, Stanford researchers find
Social Sciences
Young people entering the workforce today are far less likely to earn more than their parents when compared to children born two generations before them, according to a new study co-authored by economics Professor Raj Chetty.


Knight-Hennessy Scholars program wins design approval for Denning House, holds first meeting of faculty advisory board
University Affairs
Stanford continues laying the foundation of the Knight-Hennessy Scholars program. Denning House, the future home of the program, recently received design approval from the Stanford University Board of Trustees. The program’s new faculty advisory board met in November.


China’s perceived level of influence over Latin America questioned in Stanford expert’s research
Law & Policy
Stanford scholar Harold Trinkunas explores extent of China’s growing economic relationship with Latin American countries and its ability to influence their domestic policies.


Trustees tour Sapp Center, approve building projects, hear from deans
University Affairs
The Stanford University Board of Trustees, which met Dec. 5-6, approved a variety of building projects in various stages of the approval process, including design approval for Denning House, the future home of the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program.


Stanford is shedding light on career paths in the arts
Arts & Creativity
From lunchtime Q&As with professional artists to a yearlong opportunity to explore the music industry, Stanford is building a wide variety of professional development opportunities for students who want to explore careers in the arts.


Worm larva is like a swimming head
Science & Technology
Most animals we study have adult-like bodies early in their development. But researchers at Stanford’s Hopkins Marine Station have found that certain marine worms live for months as little more than a head.


Stanford researchers say school kids can do safe and simple biological experiments over the internet
Science & Technology
Stanford researchers have invented a remote-controlled system called the Biology Cloud Lab that enables teachers and students to design and observe experiments involving single-celled organisms.


New Stanford lab will create technologies that help alleviate poverty in America
Law & Policy
Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality launches a new initiative to develop technology-based solutions to rising inequality in the U.S.


Taking back control of an autonomous car affects human steering behavior, Stanford research shows
Science & Technology
When human drivers retake control of an autonomous car, the transition could be problematic, depending on how conditions have changed since they were last at the wheel.


Stanford University reports FY2016 financial results
University Affairs
Stanford University reported its financial results for fiscal year 2016 (FY2016), which ended Aug. 31, 2016. Consolidated net assets increased $1.4 billion, or 4 percent, to end the year at $37.0 billion.


Stanford engineers find that a new memory technology may be more energy efficient than previously thought
Science & Technology
While exploring the atomic-level forces at play in a new type of computer chip, researchers found an energy-saving surprise that could translate into longer battery life for next-generation mobile devices.


Syrian crisis altered region’s land and water resources, Stanford study finds
Science & Technology
Using remote sensing tools to uncover the environmental impacts of war, researchers introduce novel approaches for hard-to-reach areas.


Cardinal football to face North Carolina in Sun Bowl
Campus Life
For a school-record eighth consecutive season, Stanford will play in a postseason football bowl game. The Cardinal (9-3) will face North Carolina (8-4) in the Sun Bowl on Dec. 30 in El Paso, Texas. Kickoff is slated for noon (MT), and CBS will broadcast the game nationally.


Birds flying through laser light reveal faults in flight research, Stanford study shows
Science & Technology
Parrotlets flying through a field of lasers and microparticles helped test three popular models that predict the lift generated by flying animals. The work could help develop better flying robots.


Stanford unveils innovative solar generating station
University Affairs
Leading the way in sustainability and innovative green technologies, Stanford celebrated the opening of the Stanford Solar Generating Station in Kern County, Calif. The station will provide more than 50 percent of Stanford’s electricity.


Overcoming ideology
Social Sciences
Ideological divisions in the U.S. have become cultural and personal, but the younger generation is poised to reject tribalism and reinvent the nation once again, says Larry Kramer, president of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and former dean of Stanford Law School.


Preparing for an uncertain future
Social Sciences
Geopolitical challenges facing the new president – from multiple regional hotspots to the spread of technology and physical changes to our planet – are complex and long term, says Adm. Gary Roughead, former chief of naval operations and a fellow at the Hoover Institution


What are the health effects of legalizing marijuana?
Law & Policy
In a Q&A, Robert MacCoun, a professor of law and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, relays the potential risks and benefits of legalizing marijuana.


Stanford senior and alumna named 2017 Schwarzman Scholars
Awards
A student and an alumna are among the 129 students from 30 countries named 2017 Schwarzman Scholars. The program provides scholarships for one-year master’s degree programs at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.


Stanford experts discuss legal and environmental challenges at Standing Rock
Law & Policy
Protestors against the Dakota Access Pipeline have raised legal and environmental challenges against the pipeline’s construction. Stanford experts explain the current legal status of the pipeline and discuss environmental implications.


Faculty Senate discusses campus climate and immigration, classroom upgrades, student mental health and well-being
Faculty & Staff
The speakers at the Dec. 1 meeting included Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne; Richard Holeton, senior director of learning environments; Tom Black, university registrar; Jackson Beard, president of the Associated Students of Stanford University; and Amanda Edelman, vice president of the ASSU.


Charles M. Stein, extraordinary statistician and anti-war activist, dies at 96
Faculty & Staff
The “Einstein of the Statistics Department” was also the first Stanford professor arrested for protesting apartheid. Although he rarely published his work, Stein leaves behind a distinctive, intriguing life story.


Portions of the brain fall asleep and wake back up all the time, Stanford researchers find
Science & Technology
New research finds that small regions of the brain cycle in and out of sleep, even when awake. The cycles shift toward 'awake' when that part of the brain pays attention to a task.


Number of manmade earthquakes in Oklahoma declining, but risk remains high
Law & Policy
Stanford scientists predict that over the next few years, the rate of earthquakes induced by wastewater injection in Oklahoma will decrease significantly. But the potential for damaging earthquakes will remain high.


New interactive Stanford website presents unexamined data on federal programs that aid local governments in the American West
Law & Policy
A team at Stanford created an interactive website to shed light on the money the federal government has paid to counties and states in the American West over time in turn for controlling parts of their lands.


Nontoxic hydrogels developed by Stanford engineers have many potential applications
Science & Technology
Hydrogels already form the absorbent layer in disposable diapers and the curve of soft contact lenses. A new process makes these materials useful for more applications, including wine-making and firefighting.


Stanford alumnus awarded 2017 Rhodes Scholarship
Teaching & Students


Stanford scholar reveals complex history of Ottoman Empire in the Age of Revolution
Humanities
After trawling through archives across Europe and Asia, Stanford historian Ali Yaycioglu reached new insights about the Ottoman Empire during the Age of Revolution, when many Western nations revolted against existing power structures.


Stanford engineers create prototype chip just three atoms thick
Science & Technology
Ever since scientists discovered that atomically thin materials could have useful electronic properties, engineers have been seeking ways to mass-produce so-called single-layer chips. A new technique shows how it might be done.


Oldest adults may have much to gain from social technology
Social Sciences
The oldest of the adults in the U.S. who use the internet, cellphones and other communication technology report feeling less lonely, more satisfied, and more physically fit.


For platinum catalysts, a tiny squeeze gives a big boost in performance, Stanford study finds
Science & Technology
Squeezing a platinum catalyst a fraction of a nanometer nearly doubles its catalytic activity, a finding that could lead to better fuel cells and other clean energy technologies.


Stanford researchers find students have trouble judging the credibility of information online
Social Sciences
Education scholars say youth are duped by sponsored content and don't always recognize political bias of social messages.


Three faculty elected fellows of AAAS
Awards
Stanford faculty members in medicine and in Earth science have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.


Jon Mulholland to receive 2016 Marsh O’Neill Award
Awards
Jon Mulholland, director of the Cell Sciences Imaging Facility, has won the annual prize awarded to staff members who have made outstanding contributions to Stanford's research mission.


Analyzing the future U.S.-Russia relationship
Law & Policy
Reality stands in the way of a quickly transformed U.S.-Russia relationship, Stanford historian Norman Naimark says.


New MOU promotes cooperation between universities, law enforcement on sexual violence response
University Affairs


Stanford senior awarded 2017 Rhodes Scholarship
Awards
Senior environmental systems engineering major Meghan Shea will pursue a master’s degree in Nature, Society and Environmental Governance at the University of Oxford as one of 32 Americans chosen for a Rhodes Scholarship.


Stanford submits application for updated long-term land use permit
University Affairs
The university’s application to Santa Clara County anticipates housing and academic space needs out to 2035. Stanford will continue to place a priority on sustainable development and alternative transportation strategies.


Stanford statement on campus climate and immigration
Campus Life
The university has heard increased reports in recent days of people from a variety of backgrounds and across the political spectrum feeling targeted or silenced on our campus. Intolerance of others based on their background, identity or views is antithetical to our values.


Green Library exhibition highlights 125 years of student life at Stanford
Campus Life
By curating university archives and digital materials, Stanford librarians reveal the diverse history of the student experience on campus.


Strategies for moving forward
Social Sciences
Our leaders can move forward together to address poverty, tax reform and immigration reform, and heal our divisions in the process, says Manuel Pastor, professor of sociology at the University of Southern California.


Inside sports management
Social Sciences
In a short film by Stanford Graduate School of Business, executives from pro teams explain how they make the tough calls in a demanding industry.


How might the election affect Obamacare?
Social Sciences
Stanford Health Policy faculty members Michelle Mello, David Studdert and Laurence Baker discuss repealing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and how it could affect health coverage in the United States.


Stanford experts discuss polling challenges during the 2016 presidential election cycle
Social Sciences


Earthquake drill strengthens campus response skills and abilities
Faculty & Staff
Some 400 people gathered in more than 20 campus and hospital locations to practice their response to a 7.0 earthquake that, thankfully, did not strike California on Nov. 8. But it could have.


Lisa Lapin appointed vice president for communications
Faculty & Staff
Lisa Lapin, associate vice president for university communications at Stanford University since 2008, has been promoted to a new post as vice president for university communications, effective November 21.


How will the election affect key legal issues?
Law & Policy
Weighing in after the election of Donald Trump, Stanford Law School faculty look at the Supreme Court, the Voting Rights Act, executive power, race and birtherism, the Affordable Care Act, reproductive rights, marriage equality, the Electoral College, poverty law, the Rust Belt vote, the future of Dodd Frank, corporate governance, gun control and climate change.


Lapin appointed vice president for communications
Faculty & Staff
Lisa Lapin, associate vice president for university communications at Stanford University since 2008, has been promoted to a new post as vice president for university communications, effective November 21.


Miniature WiFi device developed supplies missing link for the Internet of Things
Science & Technology
Until now, there's been no way to control all sorts of devices, wirelessly, via the internet because there’s been no two-way radio smart and small enough to make this possible. A new technology called HitchHike could change that.


Stanford clinic vindicates religious freedom for Sikh clients
Law & Policy
Stanford Law School’s Religious Liberty Clinic has helped secure a landmark settlement with national trucking giant J.B. Hunt that will allow its Sikh truck drivers to maintain unshorn hair in accordance with their deeply held religious beliefs.


James A. Fox honored with 2016 Richard W. Lyman Award
Faculty & Staff
Fox, an associate professor of anthropology, received the award at a Nov. 10 ceremony.


Stanford’s first health++ Hackathon brings health care innovators together
Science & Technology
Students, health care professionals and entrepreneurs team up at the inaugural health++ Hackathon to create new technologies and lasting collaborations.


Stanford researchers send messages using household chemicals
Science & Technology
Researchers have built a machine that sends messages using common chemicals. Among many potential applications, this system could relay secret messages or allow tiny devices to communicate inside the human body.


Stanford researchers send text messages using household chemicals
Science & Technology
Researchers have built a machine that sends messages using common chemicals. Among many potential applications, this system could relay secret messages or allow tiny devices to communicate inside the human body.


Study of abandoned oil and gas wells reveals new ways of fixing the worst methane emitters
Science & Technology
New research finds far more abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania than previously thought and provides a framework for identifying wells across the United States and globally that are the worst methane leakers.


Kelp forests thriving in some locations despite environmental stressors, Stanford researcher finds
Science & Technology
In a global survey of kelp forests, scientists found that some populations are remaining stable or increasing despite global climate change in part due to local management of stressors such as pollution, fishing and coastal development.


Stanford research explores novel perspectives on the evolution of Spanish
Humanities
Using digital tools and literature to explore the evolution of the Spanish language, Stanford researcher Cuauhtémoc García-García reveals a new historical perspective on linguistic changes in Latin America and Spain.


Battery electric cars are a better choice for reducing emissions than fuel cell vehicles, Stanford study finds
Science & Technology
A study of energy use in a community near Stanford finds that all-electric battery vehicles offer a more affordable way to reduce carbon dioxide emissions than cars powered by hydrogen.


Stanford community honors fallen alumni on Veterans Day
Campus Life
Service members and the Stanford community joined together on Veterans Day to honor two Stanford alumni who made the ultimate sacrifice while serving their country. Marines Ryan McGlothlin and Michael Weston lost their lives while fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan and are now memorialized on the Wall of Honor in the lobby of Memorial Auditorium.


How can people move past anger after the election?
Social Sciences
Fred Luskin, lecturer in wellness education in the Health and Human Performance unit of Stanford’s Department of Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation, offers his thoughts on forgiveness.


How could the election affect the Supreme Court?
Law & Policy
Stanford Law School Professors Nathaniel Persily and Michael McConnell weigh in on the future of the Supreme Court and the exercise of executive power under a Donald Trump presidency.


How will the election affect policy toward the environment?
Law & Policy
Seven Stanford energy and environmental policy scholars – Rob Jackson, Charles Kolstad, Deborah Sivas, Noah Diffenbaugh, Chris Field, Katharine Mach and John Weyant – suggest what a Donald Trump presidency could mean for such issues as U.S. participation in international agreements, environmental regulation and the Keystone Pipeline.


What is the future for energy policies?
Law & Policy
Stanford faculty members Burton Richter, Dan Reicher and Frank Wolak, who are experts in energy policy, law and infrastructure, discuss the future of energy under a Donald Trump presidency.


New maps created by Stanford scientists reveal safe locations for wastewater injection
Science & Technology
New maps of the geologic forces contributing to earthquakes in Texas and Oklahoma could help reduce the likelihood of manmade temblors associated with wastewater injection.


Faculty Senate reaffirms its commitment to an open and inclusive community
Faculty & Staff
The speakers at the Nov. 10 Faculty Senate meeting included Persis Drell, dean of the School of Engineering; Provost John Etchemendy; and Sean Bogle, associate director of the Office of Community Standards, who encouraged faculty to volunteer for the office’s judicial process.


A conversation with Rick Moyer, Stanford’s chief risk officer
University Affairs
Rick Moyer, who joined the Stanford community in 2006 as chief audit executive, was recently named senior associate vice president and chief risk officer in the Office of Audit, Compliance, Risk and Privacy.


Stanford experts discuss the deep political divide in the U.S.
Law & Policy
Historic presidential election reveals a country and its electoral system in turmoil, Stanford experts say.


Stanford program helps develop next-generation STEM leaders through service
Campus Life
Student volunteers develop leadership and mentorship skills and the ability to communicate science to non-scientists.


How can the world manage a historic climate agreement?
Law & Policy
Stanford climate expert comments on opportunities and obstacles for advancing the Paris Agreement, an ambitious global climate pact that recently went into force.


Stanford solar physicist probes inner workings of the sun
Science & Technology
Neutrinos from the sun carry information about its fiery core but they are extremely hard to detect. Now, Stanford researchers may have found a much easier and less expensive way to study these elusive particles.


Letter to the Stanford community from university leadership
Campus Life


A drone for every purpose is on the way, and Stanford is feeling the buzz
Science & Technology
Stanford professors with expertise in unmanned aerial systems envision a drone-powered future that is overwhelmingly positive. But  there are likely to be many safety, privacy and nuisance concerns as well.


The enduring impact of Occupy Wall Street
Social Sciences
The legacy of Occupy Wall Street is influencing both business and politics, says Steve Callander, a professor of political economy at Stanford Graduate School of Business. View Q&A with Steve Callander (PDF)


Persis Drell named Stanford provost
Uncategorized
An accomplished academic leader and longtime member of the Stanford community, Drell will become the university’s chief academic officer and chief budgetary officer. She will assume the role Feb. 1.


Zacharias outlines Stanford UHR’s strategic plan
Faculty & Staff
Elizabeth Zacharias joined Stanford a little over a year ago as vice president for human resources. She offers advice to other newly hired staff members and outlines her plans for human resources management at Stanford.


Stanford Philharmonia conductor orchestrates a set of challenges
Arts & Creativity
Three 19th-century French works are paired with a world premiere by a local musician and composer, commissioned by a Stanford alumnus.


Q&A with Stanford statistics Professor Susan Holmes: Statistics in the era of big data
Science & Technology
Statistician Susan Holmes has been working in data science before it was a field. Now her research visualizing and interpreting data reliably is becoming increasingly important as more fields are producing vast amounts of data.


Education is the American dream
Social Sciences
Education is central to reducing inequality and increasing mobility. Stanford economics professor Raj Chetty says we should increase support for schools that effectively serve large numbers of disadvantaged youth.


Inheriting economic inequality
Social Sciences
Intergenerational mobility has stalled in the United States, leading to widespread voter frustration about the economy, says Emmanuel Saez, professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley.


Stanford-led study finds flaw in global effort to mitigate carbon emissions
Science & Technology
International mechanisms in which companies earn valuable credits for offsetting greenhouse gas output are subject to inaccurate self-reporting and need third-party monitoring, according to researchers who highlight a case study in Kenya.


The future of science education and research at Stanford
Science & Technology
Inspired by the rebirth of Old Chem into the Sapp Center for Science Teaching and Learning, Stanford professors discuss the future of science education at Stanford.


Stanford urges email security vigilance
Faculty & Staff
Recent “spear phishing” emails targeting members of the Stanford community provide a reminder of the importance of good email security practices.


Report of the President
Faculty & Staff
The Academic Council Professoriate appointments, promotions, and reappointments for the periods indicated were reviewed by the Advisory Board of the Academic Council on May 31, June 14, June 21, July 19, July 16, August 16 and August 30, 2016, and were approved by the President.


Stanford engineers set record for capturing and storing solar energy in hydrogen fuel
Science & Technology
Stanford scientists used the electricity generated by high-efficiency solar cells to turn water into a chemical capable of storing 30 percent of the sun’s energy over long periods of time.


Mystery of tropical human parasite swimming solved by Stanford researchers
Science & Technology
Bioengineers combined live observation, mathematical insights and this robot swimmer to reveal the movement of parasitic larvae that cause schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease affecting millions of people worldwide.


Researchers from Stanford, MIT and the University of Washington find ride-share drivers discriminate based on race and gender
Social Sciences
New research shows that ride-share users wait longer for pickups and are more likely to have their rides canceled if they appear to be African-American.


Hoover poll shows Trump facing historic defeat in California
Social Sciences
A new poll of California voters by Stanford University’s Bill Lane Center and the Hoover Institution also shows State Attorney General Kamala Harris leading Rep. Loretta Sanchez in the U.S. senate race, with a large percentage of voters still undecided.


Interdisciplinary thinking: Stanford scholars and students imagine truly ‘human cities’
Social Sciences
Through Stanford’s Human Cities initiative, students explore how cities can evolve into places where the focus is on people and sustainable living.


Stanford education historian David Tyack dies at 85
Obituaries
David Tyack was a preeminent scholar in the history of American education and school reform.


President Marc Tessier-Lavigne elaborates on key Stanford issues, invites input
Faculty & Staff
Speaking to the Faculty Senate on Thursday, the president said input from across the campus community will be important to establishing a vision for Stanford's future.


‘Super emitters’ responsible for most U.S. methane emissions
Science & Technology
A new study finds that just a few natural gas wells account for more than half of the total volume of leaked methane gas in the United States. Fixing leaks at those top emitters could significantly reduce leaks of methane, a potent greenhouse gas.


SLAC, Stanford launch ‘Bits & Watts’
Science & Technology
Research program combines Silicon Valley technology with industry and regulatory expertise to create a first-of-its-kind 21st-century electric grid.


Jewish, Palestinian-Israeli teens cooperate better after learning people can change
Social Sciences
After teaching Jewish-Israeli and Palestinian-Israeli middle school students in Israel that groups of people are capable of change, Stanford researchers saw significant improvements in the teens’ cooperation.


You are less anonymous on the web than you think — much less
Law & Policy
Researchers say most people don’t realize how much information they're leaving behind as they browse the web. The Footprints Project explores the vulnerabilities.


Intellectual historian at Stanford questions the idea of the American Enlightenment
Humanities
According to Caroline Winterer, to be “enlightened” meant something different to Americans living in the 18th century than it does today.


Biochemist Peter Kim leads Chan Zuckerberg Biohub project
Science & Technology
The Chan Zuckerberg Biohub will include two major research projects intended to help cure and prevent disease. One, focusing on infectious disease, will be led by biochemist Peter S. Kim.


New method of estimating biodiversity based on tree cover
Science & Technology
Scientists used tree cover maps and on-the-ground observations to measure biodiversity in Costa Rica. The results generated a method of modeling biodiversity across tropical landscapes.


Massive cyberattack poses policy dilemma, Stanford scholar says
Law & Policy
Stanford cybersecurity expert Herb Lin says the Oct. 21 cyberattack that snarled traffic on major websites reveals weaknesses in the Internet of Things that need to be addressed. But stricter security requirements could slow innovation, cost more and be difficult to enforce.  


The mark of a great commander in chief
Social Sciences
To be a successful commander in chief, you cannot underestimate or really prepare, for the intense pressures and decisions that lie ahead, says Adm. Gary Roughead, former chief of naval operations and a fellow at the Hoover Institution.


The perils of a partisan military
Social Sciences
When retired military leaders speak out on partisan issues, it is unhealthy for our democracy, says Adm. Gary Roughead, former chief of naval operations and a fellow at the Hoover Institution.


Prepared text by Provost John Etchemendy at the inauguration of Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne
University Affairs
 


‘Let us be fearless,’ Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne tells university
University Affairs
Stanford celebrated the beginning of a new era today by inaugurating its 11th president, Marc Tessier-Lavigne, a pioneering neuroscientist, technology executive and academic leader.


Inauguration of President Marc Tessier-Lavigne
Campus Life
Stanford celebrated the beginning of a new era today by inaugurating its 11th president, Marc Tessier-Lavigne, a pioneering neuroscientist, technology executive and academic leader.


Highlights of the inauguration of Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne
University Affairs
The Stanford community celebrated the inauguration and investiture of Marc Tessier-Lavigne as the university's 11th president with a solemn and splendid ceremony. Videographer Kurt Hickman captured some of the highlights of the day.


Inauguration of President Marc Tessier-Lavigne in pictures
University Affairs
On a brilliant fall day, Stanford University celebrated the inauguration and investiture of its 11th president, Marc Tessier-Lavigne. University photographers Linda Cicero and Aaron Kehoe captured moments of the day.


African Americans in the Republican Party represent a range of political thinking, Stanford research shows
Humanities
Sociologist Corey D. Fields finds that some African-American Republicans see issues of race and racism as more of a problem in America than others.


African Americans in the Republican Party represent a range of political thinking, Stanford research shows
Humanities
Sociologist Corey D. Fields finds that some African-American Republicans see issues of race and racism as more of a problem in America than others.


Board of Trustees meet
University Affairs
At its Oct. 17-18 meeting, the Stanford University Board of Trustees welcomed President Marc Tessier-Lavigne and his wife, Mary Hynes, and heard presentations on student mental health and well-being, and on energy research and the Stanford Energy Systems Innovations project. Trustees approved building projects and honored longtime Trustee Isaac Stein.


Board of Trustees meet
University Affairs
At its Oct. 17-18 meeting, the Stanford University Board of Trustees welcomed President Marc Tessier-Lavigne and his wife, Mary Hynes, and heard presentations on student mental health and well-being, and on energy research and the Stanford Energy Systems Innovations project. Trustees approved building projects and honored longtime Trustee Isaac Stein.


Stanford welcomes alumni, inaugurates President Marc Tessier-Lavigne this week
Campus Life
The Inauguration Ceremony on Friday coincides with the second day of Reunion Homecoming. Tickets are required for the inauguration, which is a private event for the Stanford community, including faculty, students, alumni and staff.


Stanford’s renovated Roble Gym welcomes student performers and spectators
Arts & Creativity
Students quickly get to work making art following a $28 million renovation of the historic building.


Micro-balloons could reveal how the small intestine adapts to dietary load
Science & Technology
A tiny micro-balloon that fits inside a fruit fly intestine could help scientists understand the forces or nutrients responsible for signaling the intestine to grow or shrink in response to food.


Stanford researchers release virtual reality simulation that transports users to ocean of the future
Science & Technology
Free science education software, available to anyone with virtual reality gear, holds promise for spreading awareness and inspiring action on the pressing issue of ocean acidification.


The relatively few African Americans in the Republican Party represent a range of political thinking, Stanford research shows
Humanities
Stanford sociologist Corey D. Fields finds that some African-American Republicans see issues of race and racism as more of a problem in America than others.


Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality to lead program to measure success of social programs
Social Sciences
A White House-sponsored $1.5 million grant was awarded to the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality and Third Sector Capital Partners.


Stanford encourages employees to review and confirm medical plan coverage for 2017
Faculty & Staff
Comprehensive information about medical, dental and vision plans for 2017 is now available. Stanford will offer its free employee-only coverage through Kaiser Permanente HMO in 2017, a change from last year’s Stanford Health Care Alliance (SHCA). Rates will increase for employees that choose plans other than Kaiser for employee-only coverage. SHCA rates for employees and pre-65 retirees have decreased from the rates initially published in September.


Nick Cave exhibition at Stanford challenges artistic conventions
Arts & Creativity
A new exhibition at the Anderson Collection at Stanford University blends the visual arts with performance. Nick Cave’s Soundsuits are part sculpture, part costume. Made of a myriad of discarded and disused materials, they are designed to be worn and moved in, concealing the wearer’s race, gender and age. The exhibition runs through Aug. 14, 2017.


Stanford Medicine, VA will collaborate to build nation’s first hadron therapy center
Science & Technology
Hadron therapy, which relies on beams of charged particles including protons and heavier ions such as carbon, is expected to increase cancer cure rates because it can be used to treat larger tumors or those resistant to conventional radiotherapy.


What motivates young voters
Social Sciences
Young voters care about issues but their turnout depends on passion for a candidate, says David Plouffe, Barack Obama’s campaign manager.


How to run a smart campaign
Social Sciences
Social media and data analytics have revolutionized elections, but in the end, it’s the candidates that matter, says David Plouffe, Barack Obama’s campaign manager.


Where’s the Golden Rule in politics?
Social Sciences
The separation of church and state is fundamental, yet a dose of values and the Golden Rule might enhance political discourse and community, says political strategist Mike McCurry, professor of public theology at Wesley Theological Seminary.


Finding commonalities
Social Sciences
Sophisticated micro-targeting may win elections but finding commonalities is critical to moving the country forward, says long-time political strategist Mike McCurry.


Stanford professor embarks on international teaching odyssey
Science & Technology
Computer scientist Jennifer Widom is spending her sabbatical year offering an experimental “massively open in-person course” across the globe.


Stanford researchers capture Central Asia’s ‘de-greening’ over millions of years
Science & Technology
The first large-scale map of rainfall declines revealed by signatures in ancient soil could help researchers better understand profound regional and global climate transformation.  


Stanford researchers find that the future of Antarctic marine protected areas is at risk
Science & Technology
Efforts to adopt effective marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean, a global commons containing the world’s most pristine marine ecosystems, are being thwarted by political infighting and fishing interests.


Senate discusses leadership climate at Stanford, trends in undergraduate degrees
Faculty & Staff
The speakers at the Oct. 13 meeting included Margot Gerritsen, an associate professor of energy resources engineering; Russell Berman, a professor of German studies and of comparative literature; and Brian Cook, a senior assessment and evaluation analyst. Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne spoke briefly at the start of the meeting.


Stanford’s Task Force on Women in Leadership recommends ways to improve the leadership climate on campus
Faculty & Staff
To help move Stanford toward fully inclusive leadership, the university should provide training, networking opportunities and mentorship for aspiring as well as newly appointed leaders, according to a new report by the Task Force on Women in Leadership.  


Unexpected insight
Stanford student-athletes gain perspective on their own lives while serving others in a program that sends them worldwide.


Stanford team finds order in a process previously assumed to be random
Science & Technology
New insights into the movement of droplets could further the performance of microfluidic chips for biomedical research, and suggest a novel approach for controlling the manufacturing of nanomaterials.


Distinguished Careers Institute enters third year and new phase
Teaching & Students
Twenty-five new fellows and their partners have been accepted into the Distinguished Careers Institute, a three-year-old program designed to help experienced leaders reinvent their lives and careers with social impact in mind.


Let’s Talk about Race
Social Sciences
This election has brought the issue of race back into our national dialogue; it’s time to have a broader conversation about whether we’re living the way we want to, says Stanford English Professor Paula Moya. View Q&A with Paula Moya (PDF)


Advisory committee on sexual assault policies invites input
University Affairs
An advisory committee of faculty and students is inviting input from the campus community on Stanford’s policies and practices around issues of sexual violence.


Stanford in New York program adds quarter focused on theme of media and finance
Arts & Creativity
Stanford is gradually expanding Stanford in New York, a three-year pilot program, to encompass an entire academic year, with each quarter focused on some of New York City’s strengths: arts, architecture, design and urban studies; media and finance; the global city.


William Perry to educate public on nuclear weapons, threats in new Stanford online course
Social Sciences
Former U.S. Secretary of Defense and Professor Emeritus William J. Perry has long been educating people about the threat of nuclear disaster. His latest effort is a free online course that includes some of the world’s foremost nuclear experts.


Stanford mathematical logician Solomon Feferman dies at 87
Obituaries
A memorial service will be held Oct. 8 for Professor Emeritus Solomon Feferman, one of the leading mathematical logicians of the 20th century. He died July 26 at his Stanford home at the age of 87.


Former dean of Stanford Graduate School of Education dies
Obituaries
Henry Thomas James, a celebrated educator and leader, transformed and expanded Stanford’s School of Education during a tumultuous time in the nation in the mid and late 1960s.


Stanford’s solar expansion project moves ahead
Campus Life
By year’s end, a new solar plant will be providing 50 percent of Stanford’s electricity and the campus will be getting 65 percent of its total electricity from renewable sources.


Election 2016: An odd blip or a fundamental shift in American politics?
Social Sciences
Stanford scholar David Brady examines how we got to Trump and Clinton, who will likely win and what it means for our future.


Can trust in people save politics?
Social Sciences
While trust in politicians and institutions may be at an all-time low, we trust one another more than ever. Perhaps, suggests communication Professor Jeff Hancock, this will help us rebuild trust more broadly. View Q&A with Jeff Hancock (PDF)


Stanford bioengineer’s microscope features interactive microbes
Science & Technology
An easily assembled smartphone microscope provides new ways of interacting with and learning about common microbes. The open-source device could be used by teachers or in other educational settings.


Stanford research offers best practices for criminal investigations of police shootings
Law & Policy
A new study by the Stanford Criminal Justice Center highlights problems with the ways in which many law enforcement agencies handle officer-involved shootings and recommends both short-term and long-term solutions.


The post-truth society
In the Spotlight
The deteriorating norms of truthfulness and authority that we’ve seen throughout the 2016 election threaten the long-term integrity of U.S. institutions, says Stanford political scientist Francis Fukuyama. View Q&A with Frank Fukuyama (PDF)


A crisis of inequality
In the Spotlight
Rising inequality, exacerbated by the 2008 financial crisis, involves significant economic, political and social costs, says Stanford political scientist Francis Fukuyama. View Q&A with Frank Fukuyama (PDF)


Stanford presidential inaugurations through the years
Campus Life
As the university prepares for the inauguration of President Marc Tessier-Lavigne on Oct. 21, Stanford Report takes a look back at past presidential installations.


Stanford researchers show air bag bike helmets have promise
Science & Technology
Drop tests from as high as two meters show air bag helmet may reduce impact by as much as six-fold compared to traditional bike helmets.  


New students to attend ‘Beyond Sex Ed: Consent & Sexuality at Stanford’ program
Uncategorized
The new program aims to start an engaging conversation around sexuality, relationships, intimacy, consent and community at Stanford.


Stanford researchers bring theorized mechanism of conduction to life
Science & Technology
Using recent innovations in 2-D materials, Stanford scientists realize a mechanism of conduction that could someday lead to new forms of energy conversion and higher-resolution scanning machines, such as those used in airports and quality control for manufacturing.


Happy 125th birthday, Stanford!
Campus Life
Events, interpretive kiosks mark anniversary of university’s Oct. 1, 1891, opening.


Stanford scientists uncover how a fluctuating brain network may make us better thinkers
Science & Technology
Communication between different areas of our brain increases when we are faced with a difficult task. Understanding these fluctuating patterns could reveal why some people learn new tasks more quickly.


Stanford releases 2016 Safety, Security and Fire Report
Uncategorized
Most of Stanford’s 2016 Safety, Security & Fire Report is devoted to promoting personal safety and crime prevention. The report also provides data on crimes reported in calendar year 2015, including an increase in sexual offenses and drug and alcohol arrests.


Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted bluefin tuna spawning habitat in Gulf of Mexico, Stanford and NOAA researchers find
Science & Technology
The study shows that the release of 4 million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon disaster during peak spawning season for Atlantic bluefin tuna could have both near- and long-term impacts on the population.


Archaeologists from Stanford find an 8,000-year-old ‘goddess figurine’ in central Turkey
Humanities
A team led by Stanford archaeologists has discovered a rare statuette of a woman made at Çatalhöyük, a Neolithic site in central Turkey, around 8,000 years ago.


Stanford Management Company releases 2016 results
University Affairs
For the 12 months ending June 30, 2016, Stanford University’s Merged Pool generated an investment return of -0.4 percent net of fees, Stanford Management Company announced.


Election highlights misperceptions about credibility
Social Sciences
Political science Professor Margaret Levi says mudslinging, skepticism and strong disagreements are all inherent to democracy, but we can at least agree on the facts. View Q&A with Margaret Levi (PDF)


Stanford announces 2016 Bright Award winner
Awards
Tom Lalampaa has won the 2016 award for his influential leadership of community-led conservancy groups that sustain local wildlife and resources.


Stanford-led team simulates the inner strain on the brain to better plan surgery
Science & Technology
A new simulation technology could one day help surgeons plan operations to relieve brain swelling before they cut into the skull.


Stanford faculty enjoy ‘silent camaraderie’ of Faculty Writers’ Retreats
Faculty & Staff
Since spring 2015, more than four dozen junior faculty members have taken part in weeklong writing retreats sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity and the Hume Center for Writing and Speaking.


Stanford physicists develop a more sensitive microscope
Science & Technology
Physicists at Stanford have figured out how to make low-light microscopy clearer without increased risk of damaging light-sensitive specimens.


Stanford announces 2016 Bright Award winner, Tom Lalampaa
Awards
The annual prize recognizes unheralded individuals who have made significant contributions to global sustainability. Tom Lalampaa has won the 2016 award for his influential leadership of community-led conservancy groups that sustain local wildlife and resources.


Old Chemistry, one of Stanford’s ‘noble’ buildings, to be named the Sapp Center for Science Teaching and Learning
Science & Technology
A generous gift from Shari and Rick Sapp, ’78, with additional funding from alumni and friends of Stanford University, has supported the restoration of Old Chem and its reopening as a state-of-the-art center for undergraduate science education.


Media or money: What matters?
Law & Policy
Law Professor Nate Persily discusses how the internet and social media are fundamentally changing campaign finance and what is driving polarization. View Q&A with Nate Persily (PDF)


Theodore W. Anderson, a renowned scholar in mathematical statistics and econometrics at Stanford, dies at 98
Faculty & Staff
Anderson, who taught at Stanford for 21 years before retiring in 1988, remained a visible presence on campus and continued to engage with and inspire younger faculty and students.


Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash wins prestigious MacArthur grant
Awards
Stanford’s Manu Prakash, as assistant professor of bioengineering, has been awarded a “genius grant” from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.


Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash named MacArthur Fellow
Awards
Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash wins prestigious award for research that includes bringing science to parts of the world where traditional tools aren't feasible.


Stanford researchers reveal details about the unique feeding habits of whales
Science & Technology
Hopkins Marine Station researchers use a combination of sensors and video to reveal details about the hunting methods of the largest predators that have ever lived.


Satellites help link Texas earthquakes to wastewater injection, Stanford scientist says
Science & Technology
The largest recorded earthquake in East Texas was triggered by the high-volume injections of wastewater from oil and gas activities deep underground, according to a study co-authored by Stanford geophysicist William Ellsworth.


Prepared remarks by President Marc Tessier-Lavigne at Convocation
Campus Life


Inauguration of President Marc Tessier-Lavigne will be Oct. 21
University Affairs
Stanford will celebrate the investiture of its new president, Marc Tessier-Lavigne, on Friday, Oct. 21, at 9:30 a.m., in Frost Amphitheater. A reception in the Main Quad will follow the ceremony.  


Prepared remarks by student speaker Debnil Sur at Convocation
Teaching & Students


Move-in day 2016 at Stanford
Campus Life
Clear skies and a refrain of "Welcome to Stanford!" greeted members of the Class of 2020 and transfer students as they arrived at  the Farm for move-in day on Tuesday. Among those welcoming students and their families to campus was President Marc Tessier-Lavigne. University photographer Linda Cicero captured some of the highlights.


Stanford part of Bay Area Biohub collaboration for health research
Science & Technology
Stanford faculty will be part of a new collaboration created by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to study biotechnology, together with UC Berkeley and UCSF. Stephen Quake, professor of bioengineering and of applied physics, will co-lead the Biohub.


Stanford rolls out the red carpet for new undergraduate students
Campus Life
Stanford will welcome the Class of 2020 on Tuesday. The day will culminate with the 126th Opening Convocation Ceremony from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Inner Quad.


New findings by Stanford chemists could lead to greener methanol production
Science & Technology
The results, published in Nature, could pave the way to the cleaner production of methanol, an important industrial feedstock and potential green fuel.


Time to adjust U.S. national security strategy amid unraveling of global order
Law & Policy
The United States can lead by democratic example, not imposition; invest in the international order; and adopt a flexible, efficient approach to using military assets against an expanding array of threats.


Stanford to roll out the red carpet for new undergraduate students on Tuesday
Campus Life
Stanford will welcome the Class of 2020 on Tuesday. The day will culminate with the 126th Opening Convocation Ceremony from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Inner Quad.


Stanford physician, author Abraham Verghese to receive National Humanities Medal
Awards
Abraham Verghese, professor of medicine and author of the best-selling novel Cutting for Stone, will be honored at a White House ceremony Sept. 22 for helping to deepen the nation’s understanding of the human experience.


Fundamentals of leadership
Social Sciences
David Demarest, Stanford’s vice president for public affairs and former White House communications director, says what it takes to be an effective president hasn’t changed. View Q&A with David Demarest (PDF)


Two new residences open in Lagunita Court
Campus Life
Meier and Norcliffe halls are the second and third new undergraduate residences opened by Stanford in the past two years. Both honor the service and contributions of committed alumni to the university.


Stanford research shows how wave dynamics and water flows affect coral reefs
Science & Technology
Understanding what aids or degrades these sensitive ecosystems can help focus conservation efforts on those reefs that are most likely to survive global warming.


Six questions for U.S. presidential candidates on nuclear policy
Law & Policy
A Stanford scholar suggests in a newly published paper that the U.S. presidential candidates explain their viewpoints on nuclear policy to the American people.


Should we abolish the Electoral College?
Law & Policy
Jack Rakove, professor of history and American studies and of political science, says yes, get rid of this archaic system. Michael McConnell, professor of law, says no, there are more important things to work on.


Larger marine animals at higher risk of extinction, humans are to blame
Science & Technology
In today’s oceans, larger-bodied marine animals are more likely to become extinct than smaller creatures, according to a Stanford-led report.


Stanford Center for Professional Development joins Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning
Teaching & Students
The combined organization will foster advances in new technologies, instructional design and pedagogical innovation for all of Stanford’s schools.


Statement from Stanford athletics director on NCAA violations
University Affairs
In 2014, the university self-reported to the NCAA enforcement office two violations that unfortunately are confirmed to be Level II violations, one each in softball and football.


Stanford engineers stop soap bubbles from swirling
Science & Technology
Engineers happen upon a way to stop the movement of the colorful eddies on the surface of soap bubbles. The results are works of art that could lead to stable engineered foams for medical treatments, personal products and food.


Breaking the net neutrality deadlock
Science & Technology
Engineers demonstrate how ‘network cookies’ could allow internet users to request preferential delivery from any network or content provider, thus preserving open internet access.


Brain-sensing technology developed by Stanford scientists allows typing at rate of 12 words per minute
Science & Technology
Technology for reading signals directly from the brain developed by Stanford Bio-X scientists, including bioengineer Paul Nuyujukian, could provide a way for people with movement disorders to communicate.


Bringing old and young together benefits both
Social Sciences
New research shows that aging adults play critical roles in the lives of young people. Volunteering is one way to bring older adults and young people together.


Hispanic voters increasingly influential in U.S. presidential elections
Social Sciences
Hispanic voters are poised to have an unprecedented influence on the 2016 election,  Stanford historian Albert Camarillo said.


A ‘potalyzer’ for roadside marijuana tests
Science & Technology
As the breathalyzer does for alcohol, this experimental ‘potalyzer’ could provide a practical field test for determining whether a driver might be impaired from smoking marijuana.  


Older people offer resources that children need
Social Sciences
New research shows that aging adults play critical roles in the lives of young people. Volunteering is one way to bring older adults and young people together.


Stanford Professor Emeritus Joseph Keller, applied mathematician, dies at 93
Faculty & Staff
Keller’s foundational theories were deeply creative and playful, providing both greater understanding to the natural world – such as how worms wriggle and joggers’ ponytails bounce – and also pivotal applications to radar, stealth technology and antenna design.


Immigration debate affects children
Social Sciences
History Professor Emeritus Albert Camarillo says that key questions in the immigration debate regarding native-born children and separation of families remain unresolved and problematic. View Q&A with Al Camarillo (PDF)


Rising Latino vote
Social Sciences
History Professor Emeritus Albert Camarillo explains why the Latino vote in the presidential 2016 election is likely to have great impact on the outcome and results. View Q&A with Al Camarillo (PDF)


Big data’s deluge in higher ed
Social Sciences
Stanford partnership launches effort to help universities deal responsibly with student data.


Q&A: Sexual violence prevention and response at Stanford
Campus Life
Lauren Schoenthaler, recently appointed senior associate vice provost for institutional equity and access, provides a current perspective on the subject of sexual violence at Stanford.


Stanford experts weigh in on the impact and influence of California’s global warming legislation
Science & Technology
The new bill SB32 will extend and expand targets for emissions cuts, putting the Golden State at the forefront of global efforts to lessen and adapt to impacts of climate change.


Stanford-hosted study examines how AI might affect urban life in 2030
Science & Technology
In the first of what will be a century-long series of periodic studies on artificial intelligence, top scientists say, “It is not too soon for social debate on how the fruits of an AI-dominated economy should be shared.”


Welcome Stanford’s new president
Faculty & Staff
Marc Tessier-Lavigne, the university’s 11th president, has made a career out of making a difference.


Stanford engineers develop a plastic clothing material that cools the skin
Science & Technology
Researchers have engineered a low-cost plastic material that could become the basis for clothing that cools the wearer, reducing the need for energy-consuming air conditioning.


Presidency has emerged as strongest of three branches of U.S. government, Stanford historian says
Social Sciences
Stanford history Professor Jack Rakove offers a long-term perspective on some of the changes and challenges facing the U.S. political system. The presidency has emerged as the strongest of the three government branches while Congress is seemingly paralyzed by partisanship.


Stanford experts weigh in on the impact and influence of California’s ambitious global warming legislation
Science & Technology
The new bill SB 32 will extend and expand targets for emissions cuts, putting the Golden State at the forefront of global efforts to lessen and adapt to impacts of climate change. However, questions remain about the legality of the state’s cap and trade program, a central mechanism for reaching targets.


How AI might affect urban life in 2030
Science & Technology
In the first of what will be a century-long series of periodic studies on artificial intelligence, top scientists say, “It is not too soon for social debate on how the fruits of an AI-dominated economy should be shared.”


Extreme-weather winters are becoming more common in U.S., Stanford research shows
Science & Technology
The simultaneous occurrence of warm winters in the West and cold winters in the East has significantly increased in recent decades. The damaging and costly phenomenon is very likely attributable to human-caused climate change, according to a new study.


Democracy depends on deliberation
Social Sciences
History Professor Jack Rakove says that the value of deliberation, a founding principle of the Republic, has been deeply damaged by primaries and professional politicians. View Q&A with Jack Rakove (PDF)


Stronger presidency than ever
Social Sciences
History Professor Jack Rakove says the presidency has emerged as the strongest of the three government branches while Congress is seemingly paralyzed by partisanship. View Q&A with Jack Rakove (PDF)


Stanford seed grants push the boundaries of innovative research on clean energy
Science & Technology
The Precourt Institute and the TomKat Center have awarded 15 seed grants for innovative energy research at Stanford and SLAC.


Medieval songs reflect humor in amorous courtships
Humanities
Through a new translation of medieval songs, Stanford German studies Professor Kathryn Starkey reveals an unconventional take on romance.  


Japan transforming its innovation culture
Social Sciences
Stanford researcher Kenji Kushida says Japanese social norms are shifting from being highly unfavorable to a tech startup culture toward one much more supportive of it.


Knight-Hennessy Scholars program in start-up mode
University Affairs
The Knight-Hennessy Scholars program, which will be the largest fully endowed scholars program in the world, is in start-up mode, laying the foundation for admitting its inaugural cohort in fall 2018.


Stanford graduate student John McMordie dies at 23
Obituaries
John McMordie was a member of the class of 2015 and would have received his coterminal degree in mechanical engineering in 2017. He is being remembered as a natural leader, innovative engineer and inspiring teacher and mentor.


Lori Jakiela and T. Geronimo Johnson win Stanford’s 2016 Saroyan Prize for Writing
Awards
The biennial literary award given by the Stanford Libraries was awarded to two writers who draw on their personal experiences in their work.


New policy governs UFV flying at Stanford
Campus Life
Under the policy, third parties from outside Stanford are prohibited from flying drones or other unmanned flying vehicles (UFVs) at Stanford. However, student hobbyist clubs will have pre-approved flight areas.


Reports on war crimes should use language that reflects a moral, not legal, orientation, Stanford expert says
Law & Policy
Legal scholar Shiri Krebs found that overly legal language in reports on war crimes is less effective than morally based communication in influencing public attitudes on accountability.


Ready for kindergarten? Gap between rich and poor narrows, Stanford study finds
Social Sciences
New education research suggests attention on early childhood at home and in preschool is paying off.


Stanford law professor unpacks political polarization
Law & Policy
Law Professor Nate Persily examines how polarization is affecting politics — from gridlock caused by elected officials’ refusal to compromise, to public incivility and decreasing respect for democratic institutions. View Q&A with Nate Persily (PDF)


Election 2016
In the Spotlight
Stanford scholars offer insight and perspectives on Election 2016 through the Wide Angle project and stories about their research on a wide variety of political and democratic issues.


Stanford expert says 2016 election reflects new trends in money, media and polarization
Law & Policy
From media and money to political polarization, Stanford law Professor Nate Persily identifies fundamental changes that could have lasting effects.


Stanford scholars untangle the science of learning
Social Sciences
Stanford education researchers distill learning theories into practical solutions for classrooms.


Hear the name, say it correctly
Campus Life
Stanford students have a tradition of welcoming first-year students on move-in day by memorizing their names and calling them out when new students arrive at their dorms. A new service uses technology to build on that tradition.


Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center reveals re-envisioned galleries
Arts & Creativity
The Cantor’s most significant reinstallation of permanent galleries in 15 years focuses on Stanford’s art history curriculum.  


Stanford chemists develop a new method of cancer immunotherapy
Science & Technology
A team of Stanford ChEM-H scientists has discovered a novel form of cancer immunotherapy, which works by removing certain sugars from the surface of cancer cells and making those cells visible to the immune system.


Stanford updates its student alcohol policy
Campus Life
The updated policy goes beyond state law requirements and applies to all undergraduate and coterminal students living in undergraduate housing. Ralph Castro, director of the Office of Alcohol Policy and Education, explains the additional prohibitions and the rationale behind them.


Incentives key to China’s effort to upgrade higher education, Stanford expert says
Social Sciences
Stanford scholar Prashant Loyalka says that incentives focused on faculty pay and student study could boost China’s higher education institutions. One area that needs attention, he said, is that Chinese students do not improve their critical thinking skills during college as much as Western students.


Stanford scientists combine satellite data, machine learning to map poverty
Science & Technology
Accurate and reliable information on the location of impoverished zones is surprisingly lacking for much of the world. Applying machine learning to satellite images could identify impoverished regions in Africa.


An interview with the new Stanford GSB dean
Faculty & Staff
Jonathan Levin talks auction theory, business education, and dinner-table economics.


Stanford scientists revise a decades-old model of how proteins move in cells
Science & Technology
By using modern techniques to study how proteins are directed to various areas within a cell, Stanford scientists are revising the fundamental understanding of cellular mechanisms. The work could impact future drug designs.


Mood plays a major role in how people make decisions about time management, Stanford research shows
Social Sciences
Psychology Professor James Gross found that people’s moods are key to deciding whether to spend time having fun or buckling down to tackle important but mundane chores.


Stanford expert suggests growth reforms for U.S. economy
Law & Policy
Professor John B. Taylor says that lower tax rates on people and businesses, regulatory reforms, free trade agreements that open markets, and entitlement and monetary reforms could give a much-needed boost to the U.S. economy.


Stanford programs prepare underrepresented high schoolers for careers in science, engineering and medicine
Science & Technology
The Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory’s Outreach Summer program and the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program fall under the umbrella of Stanford Pre-Collegiate Studies.


Stanford undergrads to lead SAVE workshops on sexuality and consent
Campus Life
SAVE is one of several educational initiatives designed to engage incoming students in conversations about the need for affirmative consent, the reality of sexual violence on campus and the collection of resources available to all Stanford students.


Stanford archivists preserve three decades of Firing Line
Campus Life
Stanford's Hoover Institution Library and Archives is helping to protect the legacy of William F. Buckley Jr.'s political talk show Firing Line by preserving approximately 700 of the 1,505 episodes.


Stanford’s Anderson Collection to host Nick Cave exhibition
Arts & Creativity
A new exhibition at the Anderson Collection at Stanford University – Nick Cave – challenges the boundaries between multiple artistic and creative disciplines.


Stanford expert: Cyberattack worries could affect elections
Law & Policy
Stanford cybersecurity expert Herb Lin says hacking could affect the November presidential election.


Stanford scientists study how to print rocks in 3-D
Science & Technology
A new 3-D printing technique developed at Stanford will help pave the way for studying delicate or hard-to-collect rock samples from afar, whether they be from a volcano on Earth or the surface of Mars.


Stanford research could improve counseling on crisis help lines
Science & Technology
Many people now text rather than call for help, allowing computer scientists to study anonymous data files and learn which counseling tactics work best.


Where one Stanford person’s trash is another’s treasure
Faculty & Staff
From a warehouse at 340 Bonair Siding, the Surplus Property Sales staff sells everything from computers to furniture to vehicles – all at significantly reduced prices.


Teens tackle big topics in Stanford’s summer programs
Arts & Creativity
At two of Stanford’s pre-collegiate summer programs, rising high school juniors and seniors plunge into history, literature, philosophy, art and science in small seminars led by Stanford faculty and doctoral students.


Stanford-led experiments point toward memory chips 1,000 times faster than today’s
Science & Technology
Silicon chips can store data in billionths of a second, but phase-change memory could be 1,000 times faster, while using less energy and requiring less space.


Stanford finance professor explains why and how to fix the ‘one bad apple’ in supply chains
Social Sciences
Timothy James McQuade shows that regulating quality standards for “untraceable goods” benefits consumers and producers alike.


Stanford probes secrets of rechargeable batteries
Science & Technology
An interdisciplinary team has developed a way to track how particles charge and discharge at the nanoscale, an advance that will lead to better batteries for all sorts of mobile applications.


Stanford provides crisis resources 24/7 to international travelers
Faculty & Staff
The university’s International Response Team is poised to provide assistance in the event of major political unrest, natural disaster or other crisis overseas. The Office of International Affairs encourages Stanford travelers to register their plans before they go.


Why and how to fix the ‘one bad apple’ in supply chains
Social Sciences
Stanford finance Professor Timothy James McQuade shows that regulating quality standards for “untraceable goods” benefits consumers and producers alike. Otherwise, the negative impact of supplier anonymity can range from bruised apples to human tragedy.


Sarah Church to become senior associate vice provost for undergraduate education
Faculty & Staff
Church, who will assume her new role Sept. 1, succeeds Stanford biology Professor Elizabeth A. "Liz" Hadley, who will complete her three-year term on Aug. 31.


Stanford historian explores roots of Rio
Humanities
In his recent book, Stanford historian Zephyr Frank explores how 19th century literature tells the social history of Rio de Janeiro, revealing the foundations of today’s Olympic city.


Stanford researchers show how we make antibodies
Science & Technology
This first, detailed map of the body's antibody production could suggest new treatment options for immune disorders.


Scheduled maintenance at the Dish Area to require closures
University Affairs
The complete closure of the Dish Area for five days will minimize the amount of time that access to the recreation region will be restricted. The Matadero Creek Trail will remain open.


Stanford researchers teach human ethics to autonomous cars
Science & Technology
Stanford engineers are creating algorithms to instruct self-driving cars how to make decisions that come intuitively to humans.


Stanford Energy System Innovations project wins more awards
Awards
The project, known as SESI, has transformed Stanford into one of the most energy-efficient research universities in the world. The accolades have now gone global.


Stanford study identifies brain areas altered during hypnotic trances
Science & Technology
By scanning the brains of subjects while they were hypnotized, researchers at the School of Medicine were able to see the neural changes associated with hypnosis.


Stanford chemists craft catalyst for making biodegradable plastics
Science & Technology
A long-standing collaboration between Stanford and IBM chemists has led to the development of a catalyst that could make biodegradable plastics derived from renewable materials – promising alternatives to plastics made from oil.


As big animals go extinct, so do the benefits they offer humans, Stanford scientists find
Science & Technology
Biologist Rodolfo Dirzo is one of dozens of researchers from around the world urging action toward the conservation of large mammals that provide substantial biologic and economic values.


Stanford students create tools to enhance teaching and learning
Teaching & Students
Education projects designed by Stanford students will be showcased at the upcoming LDT Expo on July 29.


Stanford football player dedicated to studies, sports and inspiring kids
Teaching & Students
Harrison Phillips, a rising junior, has tutored children and youth, participated in the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, and raised money to launch a new chapter of an academic,fitness and mentoring program in Omaha, Nebraska, his hometown.


Public service at Stanford
In the Spotlight
Through Cardinal Service and other programs, Stanford offers students a 21st-century approach to fulfilling Jane Stanford's hope and trust that students would use their educations to become of greater service to the public.


Stanford scholar deciphers coup attempt in Turkey
Social Sciences
As the investigation into the recent coup attempt in Turkey continues to unfold, scholar Burcak Keskin-Kozat provides context for what she has described as a “socio-political implosion.”


Stanford researchers reveal cost-effective path to drought resiliency
Science & Technology
California needs to better prepare for droughts. A new study highlights the costs, benefits and obstacles of a possible solution – managed aquifer recharge.


Predatory prawns effectively combat major parasite, Stanford-led research finds
Science & Technology
A new study upends the status quo to combatting schistosomiasis, which affects 250 million people worldwide. The Stanford-led team suggests that the spread of the parasitic disease is curbed more effectively with ecological intervention than drug treatment alone.


Deadly truck attack on French Riviera a new twist on an old terror tactic, Stanford experts say
Social Sciences
The horrific assault with a rental vehicle is likely to inspire copycat attacks, and could strengthen the hand of France’s far-right political parties, according to Stanford terrorism scholars.


Stanford research cites child mortality as major factor in lifespan inequality gap
Social Sciences
Stanford researchers found that a reduction in child mortality is a key driver in the declining lifespan inequality gap in wealthy countries including the United States, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United Kingdom.


Board of Trustees elects Henry A. Fernandez to a five-year term
Uncategorized
Fernandez, who earned an MBA from Stanford in 1983, was honored with an Excellence in Leadership Award by the Graduate School of Business in 2013 for significant contributions to the corporate world and to the community.


American political speech is increasingly partisan, Stanford research shows
Social Sciences
Stanford economist Matthew Gentzkow found that the partisan hostility in American political speech has soared in recent decades. He cites the rise of around-the-clock, partisan-leaning cable news shows as one reason.


Data can help rebuild police-community relationships, Stanford expert says
Social Sciences
Racial disparities in how police treat African Americans can be improved with more public and police awareness of the key issues, better data collection, policy changes and bias training for law enforcement, among other measures, according to recent Stanford research.


Faculty grants fund globally minded research
Faculty & Staff
Stanford's Office for International Affairs awarded faculty funds for international research on development economics, water and sanitation issues, innovation, health care and migration.


Complex view of Islam found in poetry of Iran, Stanford researcher shows
Humanities
In a study of Persian literature, Stanford religious studies scholar Ahoo Najafian describes the role of poetry in the context of modernity in Iran. Ironically, those by the Grand Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini spoke out against established, strict religion.


Entrepreneurship can be learned
Science & Technology
Business classes are not a prerequisite for entrepreneurship, but some of the most storied startup founders say they benefited from academic courses and experiential learning opportunities.


Stanford seniors’ thesis projects garner university medals
Awards
The projects conducted by the winners of the 2016 Firestone and Golden medals and the Kennedy Prize represent the breadth of the undergraduate experience at Stanford. They included research on germ cell, federal farm animal policy, the tailoring industry in Naples, ethics and autonomous vehicles, and the writings of author Zadie Smith.


Reducing civilian firepower would boost police and community safety, Stanford expert says
Law & Policy
In addition to restricting the firepower a person can amass, Stanford law Professor John J. Donohue advocates efforts to build trust between communities and law enforcement agencies as a way to enhance both police and citizen safety.


Crisis and connection is the theme of this year’s Three Books program
Teaching & Students
This year's Three Books program will feature two novels and a nonfiction book chosen by Stanford English Professor Elizabeth Tallent, who says the books share a fascination with human resourcefulness in the face of trauma.


Stanford grant programs offer environmental solutions
Science & Technology
Thanks to grants from the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, interdisciplinary teams will conduct research on problems ranging from climate change and disease transmissions to harmful chemicals and household energy efficiency.


Stanford students replicate museum objects from the Cantor Arts Center
Arts & Creativity
Stanford physics and history students explore how hands-on investigations can provide insights into the past in an art and science learning lab.


Girl Scouts can help parents make energy-saving decisions at home, research shows
Social Sciences
Stanford researchers found that when Girl Scouts participated in energy-saving education programs, the girls improved their energy-use behaviors and influenced their families to do so as well. The post Girl Scouts can help parents make energy-saving decisions at home, research shows appeared first on Stanford News.


Future of investigative reporting focused on collaboration, big data technology, experts say at Stanford panel
Campus Life
Investigative storytelling that questions society’s most powerful interests depends on collaboration and technology, panelists at Stanford’s John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships Reunion and 50th Anniversary Celebration said on Thursday. The post Future of investigative reporting focused on collaboration, big data technology, experts say at Stanford panel appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford research details ‘one-two punch’ of climate and land use changes on certain species
Science & Technology
Study highlights that paying attention to current and future regional climate can help decision-makers expand agriculture in ways that minimize harm to, and maybe even benefit, particular at-risk species. The post Stanford research details ‘one-two punch’ of climate and land use changes on certain species appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford-led effort creates a new way to analyze and control networks
Science & Technology
In an interconnected world, a new analytical framework enables researchers to better understand everything from social media sharing to the flight patterns of commercial airlines. The post Stanford-led effort creates a new way to analyze and control networks appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford researchers help to explain how stars are born, cosmic structures evolve
Science & Technology
An international team of scientists including Stanford researchers unveiled new findings on understanding the dynamic behavior of galaxy clusters and ties to cosmic evolution. The post Stanford researchers help to explain how stars are born, cosmic structures evolve appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford’s Technology Training Festival 2016 begins next week
Faculty & Staff
Instructors are eager to share tips, tricks and best practices – and to answer questions – at the annual Technology Training Festival. The post Stanford’s Technology Training Festival 2016 begins next week appeared first on Stanford News.


Group of rare blood cancers respond to new treatment pioneered by Stanford physician
Science & Technology
Patients with a group of cancers known as advanced systemic mastocytosis have few treatment options. A drug called midostaurin showed promise in an international clinical trial led by a Stanford physician. The post Group of rare blood cancers respond to new treatment pioneered by Stanford physician appeared first on Stanford News.


Living, learning together while immersed in art at Stanford
Arts & Creativity
The post Living, learning together while immersed in art at Stanford appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford English Professor Emeritus Thomas C. Moser, psychological biographer of Joseph Conrad, dies at 92
Faculty & Staff
Moser, a Stanford scholar celebrated for his penetrating biographies of Joseph Conrad and Ford Madox Ford, spearheaded Stanford’s Department of English during the upheavals of the mid-1960s. The post Stanford English Professor Emeritus Thomas C. Moser, psychological biographer of Joseph Conrad, dies at 92 appeared first on Stanford News.


Chinese entrepreneurs seek to please eager consumers
Social Sciences
During the recent Global Entrepreneurship Summit held at Stanford, the Stanford Center for International Development convened a session on entrepreneurship in China. The event featured Jean Liu, president of Didi Chuxing, a ride sharing company often called “the Uber of China.” The post Chinese entrepreneurs seek to please eager consumers appeared first on Stanford News.


Re-inventing the way we work with ‘flash teams’
Science & Technology
Researchers explain why 'flash teams' of professionals coming together for projects can have profound implications for the way organizations work. The post Re-inventing the way we work with ‘flash teams’ appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford undergrads cook up a biotech startup to develop new antibiotics for drug-resistant superbugs
Science & Technology
The numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing globally, threatening human health. An undergraduate entrepreneurship program run by Stanford ChEM-H is helping students design and test new drugs to combat the resistant bacteria. The post Stanford undergrads cook up a biotech startup to develop new antibiotics for drug-resistant superbugs appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford researchers automate process for acquiring detailed building information
Science & Technology
Stanford computer scientists and civil engineers use computer vision to automate data collection for large renovation and remodeling projects. The post Stanford researchers automate process for acquiring detailed building information appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford researchers highlight steps toward sustainable groundwater management in California
Law & Policy
Survey of groundwater professionals points to need for standardized data monitoring and makes policy recommendations for successful implementation of historic groundwater legislation. The post Stanford researchers highlight steps toward sustainable groundwater management in California appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford researcher finds link between canned food and exposure to hormone-disrupting chemical
Science & Technology
New Stanford research resolves the debate on the link between canned food and exposure to the hormone-disrupting chemical known as Bisphenol A, or BPA. The post Stanford researcher finds link between canned food and exposure to hormone-disrupting chemical appeared first on Stanford News.


Re-inventing the way we work
Science & Technology
Researchers explain why 'flash teams' of professionals coming together for projects can have profound implications for the way organizations work. The post Re-inventing the way we work appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford researchers develop new statistical test that shows racial profiling in police traffic stops
Law & Policy
The new tool shows that police in North Carolina were more likely to search black and Hispanic motorists than white ones. The post Stanford researchers develop new statistical test that shows racial profiling in police traffic stops appeared first on Stanford News.


New Stanford engineering tools record electrical activity of cells
Science & Technology
New tools for probing the inner workings of neurons developed through an initiative of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute will help scientists understand and heal the brain. The post New Stanford engineering tools record electrical activity of cells appeared first on Stanford News.


Cooperation of U.S., Russian scientists helped avoid nuclear catastrophe at Cold War’s end, Stanford scholar says
Social Sciences
During the fall of the Soviet Union, U.S. and Russian scientists and engineers joined together over a 20-year period to prevent nuclear materials and secrets from getting into the wrong hands, Stanford scholar Siegfried Hecker said. The post Cooperation of U.S., Russian scientists helped avoid nuclear catastrophe at Cold War’s end, Stanford scholar says appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford advances complex study of race and ethnicity
Faculty & Staff
Since 2007, Stanford has created 15 new faculty positions for emerging and established scholars whose research focuses on race and ethnicity, including a scholar who studies the connection between immigration, residential segregation and gentrification who will join the faculty in September 2017. The post Stanford advances complex study of race and ethnicity appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford research may lead to more durable electronic devices such as cellphones
Science & Technology
Materials scientists discover that the protective layers in chips react differently to pushes and pulls, an insight that could lead to even more durable electronic devices. The post Stanford research may lead to more durable electronic devices such as cellphones appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford scientists find ‘water windfall’ beneath California’s Central Valley
Science & Technology
New research indicates that California's Central Valley harbors three times more groundwater than previously estimated, but challenges to using it include pumping costs, ground subsidence and possible contamination from fracking and other oil and gas activities. The post Stanford scientists find ‘water windfall’ beneath California’s Central Valley appeared first on Stanford News.


President Obama touts global innovation at summit at Stanford
Campus Life
At the Global Entrepreneurship Summit on campus Friday, President Barack Obama discussed how to empower people around the world to foster the kind of innovation characteristic of places like Stanford and the Silicon Valley. The post President Obama touts global innovation at summit at Stanford appeared first on Stanford News.


At Stanford, experts explore artificial intelligence’s social benefits
Science & Technology
Experts from Stanford and elsewhere talked about the future of artificial intelligence in society as part of the Global Entrepreneurship Summit. The post At Stanford, experts explore artificial intelligence’s social benefits appeared first on Stanford News.


Obama gathers global entrepreneurs at Stanford
Campus Life
The Global Entrepreneurship Summit, hosted by the White House, came to campus this week. In addition to highlighting Stanford's role in fostering entrepreneurship worldwide, we document the signs and sounds of this three-day event. The post Obama gathers global entrepreneurs at Stanford appeared first on Stanford News.


At Stanford, John Kerry calls for entrepreneurs to tackle world’s biggest challenges
Campus Life
The world is moving faster than ever, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said at Stanford on Thursday, and we won’t solve major issues like climate change without the contributions of this generation’s entrepreneurs. The post At Stanford, John Kerry calls for entrepreneurs to tackle world’s biggest challenges appeared first on Stanford News.


Rocket men: Analyzing the breath of critically ill children at warp speed
Science & Technology
Three Stanford graduate students - all rocket-combustion experts - develop a quick, noninvasive way to detect everything from diabetes to cancers. The post Rocket men: Analyzing the breath of critically ill children at warp speed appeared first on Stanford News.


FCC chairman visits Stanford for virtual reality lesson
Science & Technology
Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, stopped by Jeremy Bailenson's Virtual Human Interaction Lab last week to learn more about the pro-social applications of virtual reality, along with the future infrastructure and policy considerations to support the technology. The post FCC chairman visits Stanford for virtual reality lesson appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford students get creative with robots
Science & Technology
After learning new software and programming languages, Stanford students in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have an opportunity to choose a creative task and design a robot to perform the task for demonstration. The post Stanford students get creative with robots appeared first on Stanford News.


Entrepreneurship at Stanford
Social Sciences
The Global Entrepreneur Summit 2016, to be held at Stanford June 22-24, aims to showcase inspiring entrepreneurs and investors from around the world. The post Entrepreneurship at Stanford appeared first on Stanford News.


Global Entrepreneurship Summit to bring 1,500 visitors to Stanford June 22-24
Faculty & Staff
During the three-day summit, which opens Wednesday, commuters are encouraged to avoid the affected areas and to anticipate heavy parking demand, potential traffic delays and bike, pedestrian and vehicle detours in the area. The post Global Entrepreneurship Summit to bring 1,500 visitors to Stanford June 22-24 appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford and White House host experts to discuss future social benefits of artificial intelligence
Science & Technology
Artificial intelligence visionaries from academia, government and industry meet to discuss how to responsibly integrate ever-evolving AI technology into the real world in such a way that all can benefit. The post Stanford and White House host experts to discuss future social benefits of artificial intelligence appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford President-elect Marc Tessier-Lavigne is preparing to take office Sept. 1
University Affairs
The incoming leader’s spring agenda included attending Board of Trustees meetings and making preparations to hire a new provost. The post Stanford President-elect Marc Tessier-Lavigne is preparing to take office Sept. 1 appeared first on Stanford News.


Lost in Translation: Can Silicon Valley Export Its Best Practices??
Entrepreneurship
A professor of management science and engineering explains why it's not so easy. The post Lost in Translation: Can Silicon Valley Export Its Best Practices?? appeared first on Stanford News.


Inspiring creativity with great content
Entrepreneurship
Brit Morin, founder and CEO of Brit + Co, describes her path and motivation for launching a platform that aims to inspire women and girls to be creative through compelling content such as videos, online classes and do-it-yourself kits. The post Inspiring creativity with great content appeared first on Stanford News.


Commentary: Part-time entrepreneurship’s full effect
Entrepreneurship
A Stanford alumna uses her entrepreneurship education to found a social-cause start up in Vietnam, where she now lives. The post Commentary: Part-time entrepreneurship’s full effect appeared first on Stanford News.


Six startup lessons every founder should know
Entrepreneurship
The entrepreneurs who launched Netflix, Instagram, and others explain what they learned on the way up. The post Six startup lessons every founder should know appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford shutters north wing of Tresidder for summer HVAC project
Faculty & Staff
Signs are posted around the building directing visitors to cafes and restaurants, businesses, university administrative offices and ATMs that will remain open during the summer construction project. The post Stanford shutters north wing of Tresidder for summer HVAC project appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford physicians use innovation to protect children’s health in Guatemala
Uncategorized
A Stanford team has created a “nutrition surveillance” app that can help boost nutrition for children in some of the world’s poorest and most remote regions. The post Stanford physicians use innovation to protect children’s health in Guatemala appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford researchers find new way of making hydrogen fuel from water and improve grid-scale batteries
Science & Technology
Stanford engineer Yi Cui and colleagues have developed new ways to improve hydrogen production and rechargeable zinc batteries. The post Stanford researchers find new way of making hydrogen fuel from water and improve grid-scale batteries appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford scientists create ‘guided chemotherapy missiles’ that target cancer cells and spare healthy ones
Science & Technology
Latching chemotherapy drugs onto proteins that seek out tumors could provide a new way of treating tumors in the brain or with limited blood supply that are hard to reach with traditional chemotherapy. The post Stanford scientists create ‘guided chemotherapy missiles’ that target cancer cells and spare healthy ones appeared first on Stanford News.


China’s environmental conservation efforts are making a positive impact, Stanford scientists say
Science & Technology
A series of ambitious environmental policies that invest in natural capital are improving services provided by China's ecosystems, such as flood control and sand storm mitigation, according to research conducted by an international team of scientists. The post China’s environmental conservation efforts are making a positive impact, Stanford scientists say appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford scientists discover coral reef ‘bright spots’ where marine life is surprisingly thriving
Science & Technology
An international team of researchers has identified a handful of ‘bright spots’ among the world’s embattled coral reefs, offering the promise of a radical new approach to conservation. The post Stanford scientists discover coral reef ‘bright spots’ where marine life is surprisingly thriving appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford researchers celebrate a second sighting of gravitational waves
Science & Technology
An instrument built in part by Stanford researchers detected gravitational waves for a second time. The observation proves the system works and improves our understanding of the universe. The post Stanford researchers celebrate a second sighting of gravitational waves appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford big data study finds racial disparities in Oakland, Calif., police behavior, offers solutions
Social Sciences
Stanford researchers analyzing thousands of data points found racial disparities in how Oakland Police Department officers treated African Americans on routine traffic and pedestrian stops. The researchers suggest 50 measures to improve police-community relations, such as better data collection, bias training and changes in cultures and systems. The post Stanford big data study finds racial disparities in Oakland, Calif., police behavior, offers solutions appeared first on Stanford News.


Britain wiser to remain in European Union, Stanford scholar says
Social Sciences
A British exit from the European Union would slow economic growth, reduce Europe's impact in world politics, and strengthen regimes such as Russia's that prefer a weaker, less united Europe, Stanford expert Christophe Crombez says. The post Britain wiser to remain in European Union, Stanford scholar says appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford Commencement 2016 Wacky Walk
Uncategorized
The post Stanford Commencement 2016 Wacky Walk appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford Commencement Weekend 2016 in pictures
Campus Life
With speeches, sermons, songs and smiles, festooned mortar boards and crazy costumes, the Stanford community celebrated the Class of 2016's farewell to the Farm. University photographer Linda A. Cicero captured some of the festivities. The post Stanford Commencement Weekend 2016 in pictures appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford Commencement 2016
Campus Life
Stanford celebrated its 125th Commencement Weekend June 11-12, 2016. Experience the highlights, including Ken Burns' Commencement address, the Baccalaureate celebration and the Wacky Walk. The post Stanford Commencement 2016 appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford Commencement Weekend 2016
Campus Life
Stanford celebrated its 125th Commencement Weekend June 11-12, 2016. Experience the highlights, including Ken Burns' Commencement address, the Baccalaureate celebration and the Wacky Walk. The post Stanford Commencement Weekend 2016 appeared first on Stanford News.


Filmmaker tells Stanford grads to appreciate the power of history
Campus Life
Award-winning documentary filmmaker Ken Burns told graduates at Stanford’s 125th Commencement to discover the wisdom of history and understand how it shapes their lives today. The post Filmmaker tells Stanford grads to appreciate the power of history appeared first on Stanford News.


Prepared text of the 2016 Stanford Commencement address by Ken Burns
Campus Life
Text of Commencement address The post Prepared text of the 2016 Stanford Commencement address by Ken Burns appeared first on Stanford News.


Remarks by Stanford President John Hennessy at the 2016 Commencement ceremony
Uncategorized
Introduction of Commencement speaker Ken Burns, and concluding remarks honoring Provost John Etchemendy The post Remarks by Stanford President John Hennessy at the 2016 Commencement ceremony appeared first on Stanford News.


Prepared text of the 2016 Stanford Baccalaureate address by Katharine Jefferts Schori
Uncategorized
Text of address “What’s Your Life Worth?” The post Prepared text of the 2016 Stanford Baccalaureate address by Katharine Jefferts Schori appeared first on Stanford News.


‘Let your passion lead you,’ speaker tells graduating Stanford students
Campus Life
Baccalaureate speaker the Most Rev. Dr. Katharine Jefferts Schori told graduates that the key to lifelong joy is devoting oneself to activities worthy of their full energies. The post ‘Let your passion lead you,’ speaker tells graduating Stanford students appeared first on Stanford News.


Prepared text of student Zainab Taymuree’s Baccalaureate speech
Uncategorized
Text of student reflection The post Prepared text of student Zainab Taymuree’s Baccalaureate speech appeared first on Stanford News.


Faculty Senate hears report on the impact of housing costs on Stanford
Faculty & Staff
The Faculty Senate on Thursday discussed how rising housing costs affect Stanford as it seeks to continue to attract scholars of the world’s highest caliber. The post Faculty Senate hears report on the impact of housing costs on Stanford appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford trustees address construction projects and university budget
University Affairs
During its June meeting, members of the Stanford University Board of Trustees reviewed construction projects, including the new Denning House, approved the university budget and feted outgoing President John Hennessy and his wife, Andrea. The post Stanford trustees address construction projects and university budget appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford Class of 2016 in a box
Campus Life
A tradition since Stanford’s earliest years, seniors bury a time capsule under their bronze class plaque in the Quad arcade with items that form a collective memory of their time on the Farm. The post Stanford Class of 2016 in a box appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford Law faculty weigh in on law of democracy
Social Sciences
Pamela Karlan and Nathaniel Persily discuss the important legal questions raised in this election year, such as redistricting, the Voting Rights Act, campaign communications post-Citizens United and how to improve the actual voting experience. The post Stanford Law faculty weigh in on law of democracy appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford University statement on efforts to foster responsibility around alcohol use
University Affairs
The post Stanford University statement on efforts to foster responsibility around alcohol use appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford Arts Institute fellows examine the role of art in cities
Arts & Creativity
A new one-year arts fellowship program at Stanford signals a shift in focus for the institute to research and teaching. The subject of Creative Cities will be explored from multidisciplinary angles. The post Stanford Arts Institute fellows examine the role of art in cities appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford researchers calculate groundwater levels from satellite data
Science & Technology
A new computer algorithm that can “fill in” underground water levels in areas where quality data is not available could lead to improved models of groundwater flow in regions where pumping and aquifer depletion are a concern. The post Stanford researchers calculate groundwater levels from satellite data appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford’s commitment to combating sexual violence
Uncategorized
Stanford University has undertaken aggressive efforts in recent years to combat sexual violence and to provide support to those who experience it. The post Stanford’s commitment to combating sexual violence appeared first on Stanford News.


A stroll through the Bowes Art & Architecture Library
Uncategorized
In the constellation of libraries at Stanford, the Ute & Bill Bowes Art & Architecture Library is the newest star. The Bowes Library beckons students, faculty, staff and registered visitors with its heavy books, its colorful wall of periodicals, its treasure chest – otherwise known as its special collections room – and its upholstered armchairs, couches and benches. The post A stroll through the Bowes Art & Architecture Library appeared first on Stanford News.


Fulbright Program awards grants to Stanford graduating seniors, alumni and graduate students
Awards
Twenty Stanford students and alumni have been awarded Fulbright scholarships for the 2016-17 academic year. The post Fulbright Program awards grants to Stanford graduating seniors, alumni and graduate students appeared first on Stanford News.


Climate scientist Chris Field named new director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment
Faculty & Staff
Field has been deeply involved with national and international efforts to advance science and assessment related to global ecology and climate change. His research emphasizes impacts of climate change, from the molecular to the global. The post Climate scientist Chris Field named new director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford’s 2016 Cuthbertson, Dinkelspiel and Gores awards honor faculty, staff and students
Awards
Five members of the faculty, a staff member in academic advising and three students, including an undergraduate earning a coterminal master's degree and two PhD candidates, will receive awards on Sunday, June 12, at the 125th Commencement. The post Stanford’s 2016 Cuthbertson, Dinkelspiel and Gores awards honor faculty, staff and students appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford University statement regarding Brock Turner case
Uncategorized
The post Stanford University statement regarding Brock Turner case appeared first on Stanford News.


Online voting is a danger to democracy, says Stanford computer scientist
Science & Technology
David Dill explains why we should be wary about introducing computers, and in particular the Internet, into the voting process. The post Online voting is a danger to democracy, says Stanford computer scientist appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford faculty honor President John L. Hennessy with gifts and accolades
Faculty & Staff
Members of the Stanford faculty and senior administration gathered on the Main Quadrangle to honor President John Hennessy. They also thanked Andrea Hennessy for her service to the university. The post Stanford faculty honor President John L. Hennessy with gifts and accolades appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford project to focus on police accountability, citizen trust in Mexico
Law & Policy
Stanford political scientist Beatriz Magaloni will lead an initiative to examine police corruption in Mexico, improve training and accountability, reduce the influence of organized crime and boost citizen trust in law enforcement. The post Stanford project to focus on police accountability, citizen trust in Mexico appeared first on Stanford News.


Two Stanford professors win prestigious Kavli Prizes
Awards
Carla Shatz has won the Kavli Neuroscience Prize for her work in understanding how the brain forms the proper connections and Calvin Quate has won the Kavli Nanoscience Prize for his lead role in inventing the atomic force microscope. The post Two Stanford professors win prestigious Kavli Prizes appeared first on Stanford News.


John Hennessy’s transformational leadership
In the Spotlight
During a prolific and sometimes perilous 16 years, Stanford's first 21st-century president remade the university from the inside out. The post John Hennessy’s transformational leadership appeared first on Stanford News.


Stem-cell therapy for stroke trial successful, Stanford Medicine investigators say
Science & Technology
People disabled by a stroke demonstrated substantial recovery long after the event when modified adult stem cells were injected into their brains. The post Stem-cell therapy for stroke trial successful, Stanford Medicine investigators say appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford’s social robot ‘Jackrabbot’ seeks to understand pedestrian behavior
Science & Technology
The Computational Vision and Geometry Lab has developed a robot prototype that could soon autonomously move among us, following normal human social etiquettes. It's named 'Jackrabbot' after the springy hares that bounce around campus. The post Stanford’s social robot ‘Jackrabbot’ seeks to understand pedestrian behavior appeared first on Stanford News.


A tendency to gravitate toward similar mates does not seem to be changing the American gene pool
Social Sciences
Scientists have found that while individuals exhibit increasing preferences for those with similar traits in deciding whom to marry, there are not similar changes in how genetics are associated within spousal pairs. The post A tendency to gravitate toward similar mates does not seem to be changing the American gene pool appeared first on Stanford News.


New anniversary book celebrates Stanford at 125 years
Campus Life
Photographer Alex Webb provides a visual time capsule of campus life with images taken during 10 days in fall quarter, 2015. The post New anniversary book celebrates Stanford at 125 years appeared first on Stanford News.


New poll by Stanford scholars shows age divide among California Democrats, GOP unity issues
Social Sciences
A new poll of California voters by Stanford University’s Bill Lane Center and the Hoover Institution shows an age divide in the Democratic Party and GOP voters slow to embrace Donald Trump. There were mixed views on the superdelegate issue and the state’s open primary system. The post New poll by Stanford scholars shows age divide among California Democrats, GOP unity issues appeared first on Stanford News.


A tendency to gravitate toward similar mates does not seem to be changing the American gene pool, scientists find
Social Sciences
Scientists have found that while individuals exhibit increasing preferences for those with similar traits in deciding whom to marry, there are not similar changes in how genetics are associated within spousal pairs. Furthermore, changes in associations between fertility patterns and various traits are not reflected in the relevant genetics. The post A tendency to gravitate toward similar mates does not seem to be changing the American gene pool, scientists find appeared first on Stanford News.


Multicultural Springfest: A celebration of diversity, longevity among Stanford’s staff
Faculty & Staff
The post Multicultural Springfest: A celebration of diversity, longevity among Stanford’s staff appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford’s 2016-17 Budget Plan reflects strong fiscal position
Faculty & Staff
While Stanford has enjoyed record philanthropy in recent years and is in excellent financial condition, the university took a cautious approach to developing its 2016-17 Budget Plan, due to recent weakness in investment markets, which impacts endowment income, the university's largest source of revenue. The post Stanford’s 2016-17 Budget Plan reflects strong fiscal position appeared first on Stanford News.


Senate hears reports on diversifying the faculty and improving the leadership climate on campus
Faculty & Staff
The speakers at the May 26 meeting of the Faculty Senate were C. Matthew Snipp, director of the Faculty Development Initiative; Karen Cook, vice provost for faculty development and diversity; and Margot Gerritsen, chair of the Task Force on Women in Leadership. The post Senate hears reports on diversifying the faculty and improving the leadership climate on campus appeared first on Stanford News.


Additional campus climate survey analyses issued; review of terminology begins
University Affairs
The university has completed and issued additional analyses of data from last year's campus climate survey of Stanford students. In addition, a working group has begun reviewing Stanford's nomenclature around prohibited sexual conduct. The post Additional campus climate survey analyses issued; review of terminology begins appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford research: Different brain cells process positive, negative experiences
Science & Technology
Combining two cutting-edge techniques reveals that neurons in the prefrontal cortex are built to respond to reward or aversion, a finding with implications for treating mental illness and addictions. The post Stanford research: Different brain cells process positive, negative experiences appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford women’s tennis captures NCAA championship
Awards
No. 15 Stanford claimed its 18th NCAA championship Tuesday, transforming a 3-1 deficit into a 4-3 victory over No. 12 Oklahoma State in Tulsa, Okla. The post Stanford women’s tennis captures NCAA championship appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford to rename Manzanita Park residence to honor Gerhard Casper’s lasting legacy
Campus Life
The Gerhard Casper Quad includes the Humanities House and three other undergraduate dorms. It also features a dining commons, an outdoor green space and an organic garden focused on teaching sustainable food production. The post Stanford to rename Manzanita Park residence to honor Gerhard Casper’s lasting legacy appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford law students get inside look at criminal justice system
Law & Policy
Inside Justice provides Stanford law students in-depth exposure to various aspects and processes within the criminal justice system. These opportunities include visits to local jails, state prisons, juvenile detention facilities, specialty courts, criminal sentencing, appellate hearings, and lifer parole hearings. The post Stanford law students get inside look at criminal justice system appeared first on Stanford News.


Mom’s voice activates many different regions in children’s brains
Science & Technology
A far wider swath of brain areas is activated when children hear their mothers than when they hear other voices, a new Stanford study finds. The post Mom’s voice activates many different regions in children’s brains appeared first on Stanford News.


New executive director for Stanford Live, Bing Concert Hall
Arts & Creativity
Chris Lorway has been named the new executive director of Stanford Live and Bing Concert Hall.  Currently  director, programming and marketing, of Massey Hall and Roy Thomson Hall – home of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Toronto International Film Festival – Lorway will assume the position in late summer. The post New executive director for Stanford Live, Bing Concert Hall appeared first on Stanford News.


New Stanford dance performances highlight different views toward ‘space’
Arts & Creativity
Four Stanford dance faculty members created four new dance works, showing how dance interacts and engages with space in different ways. The performances are slated for May 26-27 in Memorial Auditorium. The post New Stanford dance performances highlight different views toward ‘space’ appeared first on Stanford News.


Jonathan Levin named dean of Stanford Graduate School of Business
Faculty & Staff
An economist, Levin will succeed Garth Saloner, who is stepping down after seven years as dean. Levin’s appointment is effective Sept. 1. The post Jonathan Levin named dean of Stanford Graduate School of Business appeared first on Stanford News.


The disabled face significant obstacles to voting in America’s political system, Stanford expert finds
Law & Policy
Stanford law scholar Rabia Belt’s new research shows that millions of votes are lost because the disabled encounter inadequate accommodations at the polls and legal obstacles regarding mental health. The post The disabled face significant obstacles to voting in America’s political system, Stanford expert finds appeared first on Stanford News.


Annual Springfest to celebrate Stanford’s long-serving staff, honor President John Hennessy
Faculty & Staff
This year’s Multicultural Springfest will showcase Stanford staff diversity, longevity and talent. It also will include a special presentation to thank President John L. Hennessy for his commitment to university employees. The post Annual Springfest to celebrate Stanford’s long-serving staff, honor President John Hennessy appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford biologist Rodolfo Dirzo to receive Roland Volunteer Service Prize
Awards
The Miriam Aaron Roland Volunteer Service Prize recognizes Stanford faculty who engage and involve students in integrating academic scholarship with significant and meaningful volunteer service to society. The post Stanford biologist Rodolfo Dirzo to receive Roland Volunteer Service Prize appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford-NIST collaboration aims to give the bio-economy a big boost
Science & Technology
The initiative will bring together academic, government and industrial scientists to improve the measurement techniques of molecular products and processes to facilitate advances in the increasingly important bio-economy. The post Stanford-NIST collaboration aims to give the bio-economy a big boost appeared first on Stanford News.


Innovation amplifies old-school news sense for unprecedented journalistic impact, Stanford alumni panel says
Humanities
They welcomed an audience that included 150 journalism alumni, students and faculty who share an interest in how Stanford can help sustain public affairs reporting in the digital age. The post Innovation amplifies old-school news sense for unprecedented journalistic impact, Stanford alumni panel says appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford’s Community Partnerships Awards honor four service programs
Awards
Award winners are selected based on their initiative, leadership and involvement in projects that embody the spirit of genuine partnership and benefit the overall community. The post Stanford’s Community Partnerships Awards honor four service programs appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford launches its first free online course in classical music appreciation
Arts & Creativity
Anew online course features the composer Haydn and performances by the St. Lawrence String Quartet. The post Stanford launches its first free online course in classical music appreciation appeared first on Stanford News.


Learn from the past: Hoover Institution Library & Archives show why history matters
Humanities
This treasure trove of original source materials and documents draws faculty, students and researchers for inquiries, book writing, exhibitions, and classroom and educational programs. The post Learn from the past: Hoover Institution Library & Archives show why history matters appeared first on Stanford News.


Bitter primaries hurt high-profile candidates’ chances in the general election, Stanford research shows
Social Sciences
Stanford political scientist Andrew Hall found that contentious primaries that receive heavy media coverage and voter attention tend to produce nominees who do less well in the general election. The post Bitter primaries hurt high-profile candidates’ chances in the general election, Stanford research shows appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford engineers design a home urine test that could scan for diseases
Science & Technology
Seeking to relieve the burden on clinics and primary care doctors, researchers created a urinalysis system that uses a black box and smartphone camera to analyze a standard medical dipstick. The post Stanford engineers design a home urine test that could scan for diseases appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford engineer Bradford Parkinson, the ‘Father of GPS,’ wins prestigious Marconi Prize
Awards
The Marconi Prize is awarded each year to recognize major advances in the communications field that benefit humanity. The post Stanford engineer Bradford Parkinson, the ‘Father of GPS,’ wins prestigious Marconi Prize appeared first on Stanford News.


Search committee for Stanford provost seeks input
Faculty & Staff
A search committee has been formed and is seeking input on a successor to Stanford University Provost John Etchemendy. The post Search committee for Stanford provost seeks input appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford computer scientists show telephone metadata can reveal surprisingly sensitive personal information
Law & Policy
Stanford researchers show that telephone metadata – information about calls and text messages, such as time and length – can alone reveal a surprising amount of personal detail. The work could help inform future policies for government surveillance and consumer data privacy. The post Stanford computer scientists show telephone metadata can reveal surprisingly sensitive personal information appeared first on Stanford News.


Learn from the past: Hoover Institution Library & Archives show why history matters to the present
Humanities
This treasure trove of original source materials and documents draws faculty, students and researchers for inquiries, book writing, exhibitions, and classroom and educational programs. The post Learn from the past: Hoover Institution Library & Archives show why history matters to the present appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford professors recommend climate and energy priorities for next U.S. president
Uncategorized
To combat climate change, the next president should pave the way for cleaner energy, Stanford experts say. This will require public-private partnership on research and electric utility competition at the state level. The post Stanford professors recommend climate and energy priorities for next U.S. president appeared first on Stanford News.


In his final Academic Council address, President Hennessy reflects on major successes of his tenure
University Affairs
In addition to restoring the original grand plan of the university and fostering a culture of multidisciplinary research, President John Hennessy said that his proudest achievement was making a Stanford education affordable for all admitted students. The post In his final Academic Council address, President Hennessy reflects on major successes of his tenure appeared first on Stanford News.


Nancy Lonhart, ‘heart, soul and engine’ of Stanford Health Policy, wins 2016 Amy J. Blue Award
Awards
Lonhart, who provides administrative and financial leadership, guidance and oversight for the Center for Health Policy and the Center for Primary Care & Outcomes Research, is one of this year’s Amy J. Blue Award winners. The post Nancy Lonhart, ‘heart, soul and engine’ of Stanford Health Policy, wins 2016 Amy J. Blue Award appeared first on Stanford News.


‘Signature stories’ advance brands more than people realize, Stanford expert says
Social Sciences
Stanford social psychologist Jennifer Aaker says the power of storytelling is central to a company’s success in the marketplace. Signature stories are deeply inspiring narratives that advance a company’s brand and culture beyond mere marketing. The post ‘Signature stories’ advance brands more than people realize, Stanford expert says appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford music scholar explains Beethoven’s rise as a cultural icon in China
Arts & Creativity
Through interviews coupled with archival research, Stanford’s Jindong Cai researched the history of Beethoven’s popularity in China in hopes of creating cultural connections between China and the West. The post Stanford music scholar explains Beethoven’s rise as a cultural icon in China appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford faculty launch a new Humanities Core
Faculty & Staff
To study the humanities is to acquire or hone valuable skills in thinking, researching and writing, as well as to probe the mysteries and marvels of human experience and aspirations in their diverse forms. The post Stanford faculty launch a new Humanities Core appeared first on Stanford News.


Lynn Dixon, praised as ‘exceptionally responsive,’ wins 2016 Amy J. Blue Award
Awards
Dixon, the faculty data systems specialist in Faculty Affairs, is one of this year's winners of the Amy J. Blue Award, which honors staff members who are exceptionally dedicated, supportive of colleagues and passionate about their work. The post Lynn Dixon, praised as ‘exceptionally responsive,’ wins 2016 Amy J. Blue Award appeared first on Stanford News.


Perceived threats to racial status drive white Americans’ Tea Party support, Stanford scholar says
Social Sciences
In five experiments, Stanford sociologist Robb Willer found that popular support for the Tea Party derives in part from perceived threats to the status of whites in America. The post Perceived threats to racial status drive white Americans’ Tea Party support, Stanford scholar says appeared first on Stanford News.


Jörg Grawert, exceptional master of his trade, wins 2016 Amy J. Blue Award
Awards
Grawert, a lead maintenance multicraft trade technician in Student Housing, is one of this year's winners of the Amy J. Blue Award, which honors staff members who are exceptionally dedicated, supportive of colleagues and passionate about their work. The post Jörg Grawert, exceptional master of his trade, wins 2016 Amy J. Blue Award appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford engineers discover how seawater salts affect coastal algae, good and bad
Science & Technology
Active chemical agents in saltwater help to break down the byproducts of coastal algae in ways that seem to counteract deadly algal bloom but may have other, less desirable effects. The post Stanford engineers discover how seawater salts affect coastal algae, good and bad appeared first on Stanford News.


Perceived threats to racial status drive white Americans’ support for the Tea Party, Stanford scholar says
Social Sciences
In five different experiments, Stanford sociologist Robb Willer found that popular support for the Tea Party derives in part from perceived threats to the status of whites in America. The same dynamics may help explain the rise of Donald Trump in this year’s presidential campaign, he added. The post Perceived threats to racial status drive white Americans’ support for the Tea Party, Stanford scholar says appeared first on Stanford News.


The ‘close reading’ of multicultural literature expands racial literacy, Stanford scholar says
Humanities
Stanford Professor of English Paula Moya has found that an interdisciplinary approach to multicultural fiction can powerfully shape a reader’s perception of the world and improve racial literacy. The tool to achieve this is known as 'close reading.' The post The ‘close reading’ of multicultural literature expands racial literacy, Stanford scholar says appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford kicks off land use planning process
University Affairs
Working with neighbors and local governments, Stanford is beginning the process to propose to Santa Clara County an update of Stanford’s campus land use permit. Initial meetings to solicit community input are scheduled for early June. The post Stanford kicks off land use planning process appeared first on Stanford News.


Nine Stanford faculty members elected to National Academy of Sciences
Awards
The faculty members have been elected to receive one of the highest honors for an American scientist in recognition of their achievements in original research. The post Nine Stanford faculty members elected to National Academy of Sciences appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford honors emerita staff member and the Office of Multicultural Affairs with 2015-16 President’s Award for Excellence Through Diversity
Awards
The winner of the individual award is Sally Dickson, an emerita staff member who is serving as a special assistant to President John Hennessy. The winner of the program award is the Office of Multicultural Affairs within the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. The post Stanford honors emerita staff member and the Office of Multicultural Affairs with 2015-16 President’s Award for Excellence Through Diversity appeared first on Stanford News.


Ingram Olkin, influential Stanford professor of statistics and education, dies at 91
Obituaries
Ingram Olkin applied new and innovative statistical models to uncover new insights in behavioral, medical and social sciences, and is best known for developing statistical analyses for evaluating education policies. He was also an ardent supporter of improving the stature of women in the field of statistics. The post Ingram Olkin, influential Stanford professor of statistics and education, dies at 91 appeared first on Stanford News.


New Stanford class targets U.S. national security problems with Silicon Valley-style innovation
Science & Technology
Student teams at Stanford use "lean launch pad" startup methodology to innovate at speed and find technological solutions for critical challenges facing America’s defense and intelligence agencies. The post New Stanford class targets U.S. national security problems with Silicon Valley-style innovation appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford researchers improve understanding of ‘Silly Putty’ protein that could improve bioengineered tissues
Science & Technology
New insights into the characteristics of collagen, the protein that provides structure and stability for cells but which also stretches like Silly Putty, could help scientists design techniques for regenerating tissues. The post Stanford researchers improve understanding of ‘Silly Putty’ protein that could improve bioengineered tissues appeared first on Stanford News.


Financial fraud targeting older adults often involves appeals to emotions like anger, excitement
Social Sciences
Stanford researchers found that when an older person's emotions reach states of excitement and anger, they are more likely than young people to show interest in fraudulent appeals. The post Financial fraud targeting older adults often involves appeals to emotions like anger, excitement appeared first on Stanford News.


Know before you go: the importance of a medical travel consultation for members of the Stanford community
Campus Life
Dr. James R. Jacobs, the executive director of Vaden Health Center, encourages members of the campus community to schedule a travel medicine consultation before embarking on that international trip. The post Know before you go: the importance of a medical travel consultation for members of the Stanford community appeared first on Stanford News.


Stanford Biodesign marks 15 years with new name, focus
Science & Technology
Program has been renamed the Byers Center for Biodesign, and it’s now focusing on creating health-care technology that’s affordable. The post Stanford Biodesign marks 15 years with new name, focus appeared first on Stanford News.


Provost to host Stanford in Redwood City town hall
Faculty & Staff
Provost John Etchemendy will hold a town hall meeting on May 10 to discuss the latest news and plans for the Stanford in Redwood City campus. Some 2,400 staff members will be relocated to the new campus beginning in 2019. The post Provost to host Stanford in Redwood City town hall appeared first on Stanford News.


Comics like Hellboy produce a heightened adventure of reading, Stanford scholar says
Using the Hellboy series as a touchstone, Professor Scott Bukatman has discovered new ways to talk about comics while offering a heightened "adventure of reading."


Another Look book club spotlights Joseph Conrad's Shadow-Line novella
On May 10, the Another Look book club will weigh in on Conrad's "The Shadow-Line," written by one of the darkest and most prophetic voices in English fiction.


Stanford researchers create super stretchy, self-healing material that could lead to artificial muscle
Researchers show how jolting this material with an electrical field causes it to twitch or pulse in a muscle-like fashion. This polymer can also stretch to 100 times its original length, and even repair itself if punctured.


Stanford's map center devoted to the 'joyful exploration of all things cartographic'
The David Rumsey Map Center, with more than 150,000 rare maps, atlases, globes and pocket maps, will celebrate its grand opening.


Senate hears committee report on undergraduate admission, financial aid
Nicholas Bloom, a professor of economics who recently completed a three-year term as chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Admission and Financial Aid, gave the Faculty Senate an update on its work last year.


Stanford leaders address Board of Trustees during its April retreat
During its April meeting, trustees heard presentations from campus leaders on a variety of issues – economics, arts programs, the Stanford Cyber Initiative, the biomedical revolution in precision health. They also toured the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.


Stanford and Wikimedia researchers create tool to boost article creation in local languages
Wikipedia exists in nearly 300 languages but many versions are small and incomplete. In one experiment, computer scientists tripled article creation by recommending missing entries to editors.


Q&A: Confidential Support Team offers 'first stop' for students impacted by sexual assault, relationship violence
The Confidential Support Team offers a safe, confidential place for students to get help if they have been impacted by sexual assault or relationship violence. The team's new director, Helen Wilson, describes the services in a Q&A.


Amazon rainforest may be home to more animals than previously thought, Stanford scientists say
By tapping the expertise of indigenous hunters, researchers found that conventional surveying techniques underestimate animal populations and miss species in the remote Amazon. Producing an accurate count is important for planning conservation efforts.


Society needs to better understand the economics of climate change, Stanford researchers say
Gaps in social science knowledge of climate change constrain the policy impact of natural science research, a Stanford team argues.


Scientists suggest appealing to human psychology to create solutions to climate change
Targeting aspects of human psychology that can create barriers to effective climate change action may be the key to promoting environmentally friendly choices in both individual practices and national policies, Stanford scientists say.


Nate Parker to deliver annual lecture hosted by Stanford's African & African American Studies program
April 20 event is free and open to the public.


Stanford Health Care names David Entwistle president and CEO
Stanford Health Care (SHC) announced today that its Board of Directors has appointed David Entwistle as president and CEO, effective July 5, 2016.


Seven students with Stanford affiliations awarded 2016 Soros Fellowships for New Americans
Soros Fellowships provide financial support for study in any degree-granting graduate program in any field at any U.S. university. Fellows are immigrants and the children of immigrants who are chosen for their creativity, initiative and sustained accomplishment.


At Stanford, inclusion is everyone's work
The Diversity and First-Gen Office (DGen) at Stanford is the hub of support for first-generation and low-income students and the nucleus for inclusion and diversity programs. The office is playing a key role in Stanford's yearlong OpenXChange initiative.


Nate Parker speaks at African & African American Studies program at Stanford
April 20 event is free and open to the public.


Geography, income play roles in life expectancy, new Stanford research shows
Stanford economist Raj Chetty found that the link between income and life expectancy varies from one area to another within the United States. The gap between the country's rich and poor widened during the 2000s.


Popular vote better than Electoral College, Stanford scholars say
The Electoral College distorts presidential campaigns, disenfranchises voters and drives partisanship, Stanford scholars say. They suggest constitutional reforms to adopt a single national popular vote where the one-person, one-vote concept applies.


Stanford humanities students cook up Julia Child's recipes, study history
Kristen Haring takes her American studies class into a "teaching kitchen" to study the famed chef's impact on American culture.


Statement from Randy Livingston regarding compromised tax data


Students, administrators convene process to advance diversity, inclusion at Stanford
In response to concerns raised by a group called the Who's Teaching Us coalition, Stanford leaders and student representatives are convening discussions on multiple subjects focused on advancing diversity and inclusion on campus.


Ram's Head Theatrical Society at Stanford presents Rent – still relevant, still rocking
The student-run company utilizes new staging strategies in Memorial Auditorium.


Partners in discovery: SLAC + Stanford collaborations
Working together, researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford expand our knowledge of materials, molecules and the universe.


Changes in human reproduction raise legal, ethical issues, Stanford's Hank Greely says
The implications of emerging biotechnologies and what they mean for human reproduction and making babies raises legal, ethical and social issues, according to Stanford Law Professor Hank Greely.


Populations of early human settlers grew like an 'invasive species,' Stanford researchers find
When humans colonized South America, an initial explosive population growth rapidly reached the environment's carrying capacity.


Changes in human reproduction raise legal, ethical issues, Stanford scholar says
The implications of emerging biotechnologies and what they mean for human reproduction and making babies raises legal, ethical and social issues, according to Stanford Law Professor Hank Greely.


Master of Liberal Arts program celebrates 25 years at Stanford
Stanford's master of liberal arts program, among the most rigorous nation-wide, has awarded 259 degrees in the past 25 years.


Stanford scientists improve perovskite solar-cell absorbers by giving them a squeeze
Adding pressure could improve the performance of solar cells made of perovskites, a promising photovoltaic material.


Stanford Perimeter Trail finished, adding link to recreational trails
Work is now complete on the Stanford Perimeter Trail, a 3.4-mile link between recreational areas in the foothills and the bay.


Stanford historian examines age-old inquiry about what it means to be 'living'
In research covering four centuries of scientific debate, Stanford historian Jessica Riskin investigates different views of man and machine, and how this debate laid the groundwork for later theories of evolution and science.


Stanford's Codiga Resource Recovery Center to open in May
The new Codiga Resource Recovery Center, which opens in May on Bonair Siding, could revolutionize the 100-year-old wastewater treatment paradigm while it helps accelerate the commercialization of promising new technologies.


Stanford scientists shed light on powerful currents that create massive underwater canyons
Through the use of mathematical models, Stanford researchers have better defined the powerful processes that carved some of the largest canyons on Earth, deep under the oceans.


California drought patterns becoming more common, Stanford scientists say
Researchers expect more occurances of the 'ridiculously resilient ridge' that appeared in the latter half of California's multi-year drought.


Stanford historical memory project seeks WWII reconciliation in Asia
A Stanford project encourages World War II reconciliation and historical accuracy about the conflict and its consequences in Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan and the United States. Progress has been made on classroom textbooks and scholarly discussions and exchanges.


Stanford students create a mobile art studio that rolls with learning opportunities
A Stanford student-built mobile art space offers rewarding experiences in creativity and sustainability.


Stanford researchers show fracking's impact to drinking water sources
A case study of a small Wyoming town reveals that practices common in the fracking industry may have widespread impacts on drinking water resources.


Moscow journalist Maria Stepanova to speak about Russia's future
Publisher and poet Maria Stepanova, one of the most visible figures in post-Soviet Russia, will visit Stanford on April 6-7 to speak about her country's search for identity.


Stanford scientists find abandoned drug effective against 2 human viruses in lab
Stanford scientists have resurrected a discarded drug that helps human cells in a lab dish fight off two different viruses. Based on what they learned about how the drug works, it might also help fight the viruses that cause Ebola, dengue and Zika, among others.


Stanford students present their self-designed, self-manufactured creations
Meet the Makers: The Product Realization Lab allows students to design and manufacture most anything imaginable.


Brussels suicide attacks 'shocking but not surprising,' Stanford experts say
Inner-city neighborhood with links to suspects was known as a base for terrorists to launch attacks across Europe and beyond.


Stanford scholar explores changing gestures of digital age
Vanessa Chang's research shows how interactions with objects are evolving amid technological change, revealing new gestures that are becoming a way of life in the contemporary world.


The Farm comes to Shanghai and Seoul
Nearly 600 alumni and friends in Shanghai and Seoul attend Stanford+Connects for an immersion in all things Cardinal.


Stanford offers admission to 2,063 students from around the world
The Office of Undergraduate Admission announced today that 2,063 high school students have been admitted to the Class of 2020 from a pool of 43,997.


New insights into human tears could improve contact lenses, Stanford researchers say
Chemical engineers at Stanford have discovered mechanical properties of the tear film on the eye's surface that can be used to manufacture contact lenses that more closely mimic the eye.


Clinton at Stanford: Global alliances key to ending terrorism
Hillary Clinton said this week's attacks in Belgium were a "brutal reminder" that the United States and its allies must work even more closely in their counterterrorism efforts: "We cannot contain ISIS. We must defeat ISIS."


Stanford installing fourth roundabout
Underground utility work has begun on a roundabout at the intersection of Galvez Street and Campus Drive.


New insights into human tears could improve contacts lenses, Stanford researchers say
Chemical engineers at Stanford have discovered mechanical properties of the tear film on the eye's surface that can be used to manufacture contact lenses that more closely mimic the eye.


Companies cut costs by replacing private plans, Stanford research shows
Stanford law Professor Alison Morantz found that company costs dropped by about 44 percent when firms replace workers' compensation with private plans.


Stanford scientists identify genetic switch for female sexual behavior
By studying the mating of cichlid fish, the scientists identified a single brain receptor in female fish that determines whether they successfully reproduce. The finding might influence the understanding of humans' social behavior.


Stanford scientists develop new technique for imaging cells and tissues under the skin
A team of Stanford Bio-X scientists developed the first technique for viewing cells and tissues in three dimensions under the skin. The work could improve diagnosis and treatment for some forms of cancer and blindness.


Art studio doors open to showcase Stanford student work
After putting in long hours all quarter, students taking courses in the Department of Art and Art History throw open the studio doors and invite the Stanford community to see what they've been working on.


Multi-fault ruptures can unleash stronger earthquakes, Stanford scientists say
Research based on a new study of California's 1812 earthquake yields insights to improve future seismic hazard predictions.


Stanford expert offers approach to thwarting radicalization of Muslim immigrants in the U.S.
Telling Muslims they are not welcome in the United States reinforces the narrative that the West is anti-Islam, a Stanford scholar says. Immigrants fare better when they receive opportunities to integrate their original cultural identities with their new ones.


Redwood City campus will evoke look, feel of Stanford, says University Architect David Lenox
Building a campus from scratch has provided both opportunities and challenges for the Campus Planning and Design Office. University Architect David Lenox talks about the university's approach to the new campus' look and feel.


Stanford students learn how to explain science
The new Notation in Science Communication program offers students a way to develop their ability to share technical information with a variety of audiences, from prospective employers to the general public. Through coursework, advising and reflection, students learn ways to convey complicated ideas – leading to a better understanding of the material for themselves and for their audience.


Tumultuous 2016 GOP campaign a phenomenon long in the making, Stanford researcher says
Causes include  widening policy differences between the parties and a fractured Republican base.


Robert P. Huff, Stanford's first financial aid director, dead at 89
"What I most enjoy is seeing students, particularly those who have had difficult kinds of financial problems, graduate and go on to successful careers," Huff said in a 1991 interview with "Campus Report." "That's what makes it all worthwhile."


'Depictions' play key role in human communication, Stanford research shows
The study of human communication, however, generally overlooks this dynamic, Stanford psychologist Herbert Clark says.


Double whammy of multi-fault ruptures can unleash stronger earthquakes, Stanford scientists say
Research based on a new study of California's 1812 earthquake yields insights to improve future seismic hazard predictions.


Stanford chemists develop an ultra-sensitive test for cancers, HIV
Catching a disease in its earliest stages can lead to more effective therapies. Stanford chemists have increased the likelihood of detecting these diseases via a test that is thousands of times more sensitive than current diagnostics.


Physical gestures play key role in human communication, Stanford research shows
The study of human communication, however, generally overlooks this dynamic, Stanford psychologist Herbert Clark says.


Stanford computer model shows how modern interventions affect tropical forests, indigenous peoples
A computer simulation shows that carefully designing government interactions with rural indigenous people is critical for protecting the sustainability of people, wildlife and the land.


Stanford water expert on lessons of Flint, Michigan, crisis
The lead in Flint, Michigan's water was due to a failure of government responsibility and a lack of water systems knowledge, says Richard Luthy, but the health crisis can provide strategies for improving the nation's aging water infrastructure.


Stanford students learn to explain science news that nonscientists can understand
The new Notation in Science Communication program offers students a way to develop their ability to share technical information with a variety of audiences, from prospective employers to the general public. Through coursework, advising and reflection, students learn ways to convey complicated ideas – leading to a better understanding of the material for themselves and for their audience.


Bunyan Lecture at Stanford: 'The Universes Beyond the Horizon'
Infinite 'bubble universes,' filled with alternate versions of ourselves or nothing at all, might exist right alongside our own, according to physicist Alexander Vilenkin of Tufts University, who will discuss this theory during Stanford's annual Bunyan Lecture on March 9.


Cash aid to households reduces insurgency threats, Stanford research shows
Stanford researcher Joseph Felter found that direct cash assistance to households in the Philippines decreased insurgent-led conflicts and weakened their influence in those villages.


Sophomore College Alaska immerses Stanford students in the Last Frontier
Two weeks in the wilderness introduce select group to the ecology and economics of the 49th state.


Stanford to establish principles for renaming streets and buildings
After establishing principles for reconsidering and renaming streets and buildings on campus, a committee composed of faculty, students and staff will apply the principles first to places that honor Junipero Serra.  


Stanford political scientists discuss diplomacy and foreign policy amid global turmoil
Stanford foreign policy experts discussed flashpoints around the world at an OpenXChange event this week.


Fukushima five years later: Stanford nuclear expert offers three lessons from the disaster
On the fifth anniversary of the partial meltdown at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant, Stanford's Rodney Ewing says we should rethink our language, reassess natural disaster risks and appreciate the links between nuclear energy and other renewables.


Stanford scientists report new insights into HIV's evolution that can improve pharmaceutical testing techniques
Using two decades of HIV data, Stanford scientists found that effective treatment caused the virus to evolve differently than less effective treatments. They hope this insight will improve testing of new drugs.


Curiosity leads Stanford bioengineers to discover insect's flight secret
A chance observation of a water lily beetle flitting from pad to pad inspired researchers to investigate how it overcomes the physical challenges of flying over water.


2015 Staff Survey results
Last fall, 61 percent of Stanford's staff participated in a survey that asked about working at the university. Respondents expressed pride in the institution and the opportunities it affords, while expressing a need for a better understanding of university priorities.


Stanford professor explains the secret sauce for successful startups in China
Research by Charles Eesley shows that funding is only one part of the complex entrepreneurial ecosystem, and that an innovative product isn't necessarily enough for success.


Autonomous car drives Stanford engineers' quest for highway safety


Stanford cryptography pioneers win 2015 Turing Award
The groundbreaking algorithm from Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman enabled a secure Internet and sparked a clash with the NSA that foreshadowed current privacy battles between government agencies and Silicon Valley companies.


Trustees address a range of issues
During its recent meeting, the Stanford Board of Trustees endorsed the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program, set tuition, approved construction projects, discussed investment responsibility and the Year of Learning, and welcomed former trustees back to campus with a program in the arts district.


Stanford researchers find effective recipe for slowing deforestation
Collaborative efforts to reduce deforestation were more than twice as effective as "confrontational" programs developed by either industry or nongovernmental organizations, according to a first-of-its kind study.


Stanford campus shines for families visiting for Parents' Weekend
More than 3,500 family members visited Stanford over the sunny weekend to roam the grounds, sample student life and, most of all, spend time with their sons and daughters.


Stanford's historic Roble Gym to open in the fall after arts-oriented renovation
Harry Elam, vice provost for undergraduate eduation and a drama professor, will direct the first theater production in the newly renovated building.


Stanford alumni: Passion and perseverance key to entrepreneurial success
Panelists offered a frank discussion of the highs and lows of start-up life at the "Celebrating Founders" symposium.


Stanford organist draws lofty sounds from Memorial Church's thousands of pipes
Under the skillful hands – and feet – of university organist Robert Huw Morgan, Stanford's Memorial Church fills with remarkable music from the Fisk-Nanney organ, a Baroque-type instrument that is one of five organs in the church.


Stanford engineers use rust to build a solar-powered battery
Heating simple metal oxides, like rust, could become the foundation for a solar technology that would make and store electricity by separating the hydrogen and oxygen atoms that make up water.


Stanford Parents' Weekend 2016 opens Friday
Dozens of activities, including Hike the Dish, Back to School Classes for Parents, pop-up talks in the arts district and a Q&A with President Hennessy, are planned for the annual event.


Stanford trustees approve 2016-17 tuition, reaffirm university's financial aid commitment
Under Stanford's undergraduate financial aid program, typical parents with incomes below $125,000 pay no tuition, and those with incomes below $65,000 pay no tuition, mandatory fees, room or board.


Pioneering Stanford computer researcher and educator Edward McCluskey dies
The professor emeritus who paved the way for everything from complex chips to crash-proof computers, and who trained 75 PhDs, also loved quirky hats and nature.


Stanford launches Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program
Global, multidisciplinary graduate scholarships are backed by a major gift from philanthropist, American businessman Philip Knight. Stanford President John Hennessy will serve as the inaugural director after he steps down as president this summer.


Stanford researchers use dark of night and machine learning to shed light on global poverty
An interdisciplinary team of Stanford scientists is identifying global poverty zones by comparing daytime and nighttime satellite images in a novel way.


'Squishiness' can indicate embryo viability, Stanford researchers find
A team of bioengineers and physicians has found that the squishiness of an hour-old fertilized egg can predict its viability, a metric that could lead to safer, more successful IVF pregnancies.


Stanford scientists find intense ocean turbulence in equatorial Pacific
The findings could help solve an outstanding mystery about the circulation of the world's oceans and help improve future climate forecasts.


President Obama to host Global Entrepreneurship Summit 2016 at Stanford University


Faculty Senate hears presentations on academic computing and student government concerns
The speakers at the Feb. 18 meeting were Vijay Pande, professor of chemistry; John-Lancaster Finley, ASSU president; and Brandon Hill, ASSU vice president.


Katharine Jefferts Schori named Stanford Baccalaureate speaker
The Most Rev. Dr. Katharine Jefferts Schori, head of the Episcopal Church until November 2015, will serve as the 2016 Stanford Baccalaureate speaker on June 11. Jefferts Schori graduated from Stanford in 1974 with a degree in biology.


Stanford sociologist and faculty leader Sanford Dornbusch dies at 89
Sanford M. Dornbusch, a scholar renowned for his research on adolescence, was a "founding father" of Stanford's Department of Sociology.


Stanford scientist weighs risk of groundwater contamination from oil and gas wells
Faulty, shallow wells can leak oil and natural gas into underground drinking-water supplies, Stanford Professor Rob Jackson finds.


Stanford Literary Lab uses digital humanities to study why we feel suspense
Mark Algee-Hewitt and a team of grad students combine tools of textual analysis with the emotional experience of reading to uncover what creates suspense in stories.


Oxygen-starved oceans held back life's recovery after the Great Dying, Stanford researchers find
Analysis of ancient seabed rocks from disparate locations reveal that life did not rebound until anoxia had fully ebbed.


Brain size might put mammals at extinction risk, Stanford research shows
Scientists have long associated larger brain size with a cognitive ability to adapt to difficult scenarios, but new research suggests that mammals with relatively larger brains might be at a higher risk of extinction.


California Coastal Commission decision-making examined in Stanford research
Stanford scholar Iris Hui found that the California Coastal Commission approaches decisions through a consistent process. For her analysis, she used "text mining" to examine the commission's record.


Stanford professor uncovers roots of George Orwell's political language
Through a close reading of George Orwell's nonfiction prose, Stanford English Professor Alex Woloch shows how language and democratic socialism played roles in the British writer's stand against totalitarianism.


Culture shapes how leaders smile, Stanford research shows
Stanford psychologist Jeanne Tsai found that the more a particular country's culture values excitement, the more its political leaders show enthusiastic smiles. On the other hand, when the specific culture emphasizes calm, those leaders show more reserved smiles.


Stanford senior Maheetha Bharadwaj awarded Gates Cambridge Scholarship
The scholarship, established by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, covers the cost of graduate studies in any subject at the University of Cambridge.


Give your sweetheart mushrooms this Valentine's Day, says Stanford scientist
A romantic evening of chocolate and wine would not be possible without an assist from fungi, says Stanford biology professor Kabir Peay. In fact, truffles might be the ultimate romantic gift, as they exude pheromones that can attract female mammals.


Stanford senior awarded Gates Cambridge Scholarship
The scholarship, established by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, covers the cost of graduate studies in any subject at the University of Cambridge.


Stanford scientists celebrate technological advances that made gravitational wave detection possible
An international team of scientists has taken a step toward understanding the universe.


Stanford project suggests longer, healthier lives are possible
A Stanford analysis shows how to enhance longevity and well-being through healthy living, financial security and social relationships.


Stanford researchers develop financing framework to fund critical freshwater projects
Using lessons from the energy sector, Stanford researchers outline strategies to bring the nation's water infrastructure into the 21st century.


Stanford engineers battle bias in the criminal justice system
A team of engineers uses computational analysis tools to scrape information from police-related incidents to reveal discrimination and reduce crime.


Stanford Athletics is showing its 'greener' side
Stanford Athletics is working to reduce its environmental footprint and raise awareness about its commitment to sustainability.


Quality of schools is critical for economic growth in developing countries, Stanford expert says
Stanford economist Eric Hanushek said that a country's economic growth is directly based on the cognitive skills of the population, or the "knowledge capital" of a nation.


At Stanford, seeking dialogue on investment responsibility
Alison Colwell, who recently joined Stanford to lead the new Investment Responsibility Stakeholder Relations program, brings global experience and a passion for bringing people together.


Stanford honors leaders past, present and future with 'Founders' symposium
In the second in a series of symposia marking Stanford's 125th year, President John Hennessy will open a campus conversation with alumni who have put their ideas into action in the world.


Paul Armer, former director of Stanford Computation Center, dies at 91
A manager and lecturer in the Computer Science Department, Paul Armer voiced early concerns about computer privacy and surveillance.


Stanford's incoming president comes to campus
After unanimous approval by the Stanford Board of Trustees, Marc Tessier-Lavigne was introduced as Stanford's next president. Tessier-Lavigne's day on campus included meeting members of the Stanford community at several events such as a meeting of the Faculty Senate.


Health advisory information for the campus community


Faculty Senate meets Stanford's next president
Kathryn Ann Moler, chair of the Faculty Senate, introduced Marc Tessier-Lavigne, who will succeed John Hennessy as president of Stanford. Tessier-Lavigne, who will take office Sept. 1, gave a brief address. John Mitchell, vice provost for teaching and learning at Stanford, presented an overview and update of his office's work.


Stanford engineers build cube-like rover for exploration of asteroids, comets
Dubbed "Hedgehog," the hopping, whirling robot is designed for extreme environments and low levels of gravity.  


Neuroscience pioneer Marc Tessier-Lavigne named Stanford's next president
Tessier-Lavigne, president of The Rockefeller University and former Stanford faculty member, will assume the role Sept. 1.


Voting for 49th Senate of the Academic Council underway
It's time for members of the Academic Council to vote for next year's Faculty Senate and to nominate full professors to fill vacancies on the Advisory Board.


Stanford scientists uncover neural pathway responsible for opioid withdrawal
Stanford researchers manipulated the brains of morphine-addicted mice and allowed the animals to overcome withdrawal symptoms. The finding could offer a new approach to quieting symptoms that often lead to recurring drug use.


Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project awards $7.6 million for energy research
GCEP is funding innovative energy research at Stanford and three other universities.


Human culture, not smarts, may have overwhelmed Neanderthals, say Stanford researchers
New mathematical model suggests that our higher level of cultural organization may have allowed us to prevail.


Stanford sports management expert offers a business persective on the big game
George Foster of the Graduate School of Business explains how the NFL turned the Super Bowl into a wild success.


Stanford's interdisciplinary approach fuels critical advances in research
A culture of collaboration drives innovative discoveries in areas vital to our world, our health and our intellectual life.


Stanford study: U.S. performs poorly on poverty, inequality measures
A new Stanford report shows that, compared with other well-off countries, the United States has the worst overall ranking on key poverty and inequality indicators.


Stanford University advisory on Zika virus


Filmmaker Ken Burns will be Stanford's 2016 Commencement speaker
The documentary filmmaker, who has received dozens of major awards for his work, will speak at the university's main ceremony in Stanford Stadium on Sunday, June 12.


Stanford Interdisciplinary
A culture of collaboration drives innovative discoveries in areas vital to our world, our health and our intellectual life.


Stanford scholars look to 1930s radio technology to help improve Internet security
A new study shows how harnessing the quantum properties of light can create a transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping.


Stanford engineers to Stephen Colbert: It is plausible to climb like Spider-Man
By using a novel controllable adhesive system, a Stanford engineer shows that a person can scale a glass wall just like Spidey.


Stanford chemical engineering major wins Churchill Scholarship
The goal of the scholarships, established at the request of Sir Winston Churchill, a British statesman and former prime minister, is to advance science and technology on both sides of the Atlantic, helping to ensure future prosperity and security.


Stanford experts reveal latest Doomsday Clock estimate
The world remains perilously close to a nuclear disaster or catastrophic climate change that could devastate humanity.


With change ahead, campus service station to wind down operations


Herbert Abrams, pioneering radiologist and anti-nuclear activist at Stanford, dies at 95
Herbert Abrams' multi-faceted career embraced patient care, teaching and medical research as well as a passionate advocacy for world peace.


Stanford scholar unearths conflicted human history of South American parks


Stanford releases fundraising results
In 2014–15, gifts to Stanford included a significant collection of art and support for the university's two hospitals.


Warrior's view of the Battle of the Little Bighorn on display at Stanford
The "Red Horse" exhibition at the Cantor Arts Center provides a treasure trove of illustrations and insights on Custer's Last Stand in 1876.


Stanford's Faculty Senate discusses shifting educational environment
Harry J. Elam Jr., vice provost for undergraduate education, titled his annual address to the senate "Our Shifting Educational Environment: Why Stanford's Leadership in Higher Education is Critical Now."


Stanford scientists discover how Pangea helped make coal
The same geologic forces that helped stitch the supercontinent Pangea together also helped form the ancient coal beds that powered the Industrial Revolution.


Stanford New Ensemble presents new classical music in new ways to new audiences
The Stanford New Ensemble offers music that is experimental and performed in untraditional venues around campus.


Q&A with Mariann Byerwalter, interim president and CEO of Stanford Health Care
Recently named interim president and CEO of Stanford Health Care, Mariann Byerwalter talks about why this is a particularly exciting time for SHC as it builds a new hospital and pursues innovative breakthroughs that improve people's lives.


Jeffrey Koseff to receive Stanford's 2015 Richard W. Lyman Award
Koseff, a professor of civil and environmental engineering, and founding co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, will be honored at a Jan. 20 award dinner.


Stanford offers grants for innovations in teaching and learning
The Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching & Learning has set a Feb. 15 deadline to submit proposals for its Winter 2016 Grant Program.


Bryan Stevenson highlights racism, inequity in criminal justice system in Stanford talk
Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Alabama-based Equal Justice Initiative, said Americans need to better understand the deep racial problems in the criminal justice system and their societal consequences.


Buried nuclear waste risky, say Stanford experts
Radioactive material from the laboratories that design America's nuclear weapons will have to be buried and kept away from humans for at least 10,000 years. But three Stanford experts say the safety analysis of this project needs to be revised to reflect new strategies that aim to substantially increase the amounts of plutonium to be disposed of.


Stanford researcher creates method to measure resource tradeoffs in times of drought
A new computer model developed by a Stanford scientist can be used by resource managers around the world to weigh food and energy tradeoffs when water is scarce.


Escondido Village housing project moves ahead with revisions


Film director Werner Herzog visits Stanford to talk about literary classic on falcons
Legendary film director Werner Herzog will discuss J.A. Baker's book The Peregrine with Robert Harrison, a Stanford professor of Italian literature, at the Feb. 2 Another Look book club event.


Californians most concerned about drought and state's economy, Stanford poll shows
A new poll by the Hoover Institution and the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford reveals that California's voters are most worried about the drought and state's economic recovery.


Stanford celebrates a life and legacy of inspiration
The Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute offers an extensive archive of the civil rights leader's work.


Fad diets shape societal trends about health, Stanford scholar reveals
Stanford doctoral candidate Adrienne Rose Johnson says contemporary diet advice idealizes lifestyles of the past in ways that contribute to global health problems.


New Stanford battery shuts down when too hot, restarts when it cools
Stanford researchers have invented a lithium-ion battery that could prevent battery fires that have plagued laptops, hoverboards and other electronic devices.


Water vulnerability threatens developing nations' stability, Stanford researchers find
An analysis of 119 low-income countries finds common challenges that could inform broad solutions.


Stanford study suggests academic benefits to ethnic studies courses
New research shows gains in attendance, GPA of at-risk high school students from incorporating culturally relevant pedagogy.


Federal budget expert Alice Rivlin receives Stanford's 2016 SIEPR Prize
Rivlin is the fourth recipient of the $100,000 biennial prize, awarded by the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. She was cited for her dedication to enhancing economic policy in order to improve people's lives.


Stanford students among winners of new scholarship for study in China
Two Stanford students are among the 100 students from around the world named 2016 Schwarzman Scholars. The program provides scholarships for a one-year master's degree program at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The program is inspired by the Rhodes Scholarship.


Oleg D. Sherby, professor of materials science and engineering, dies at 90
Hailed for the discovery of superplastic steel, Sherby was a professor at Stanford for 30 years. He was known on campus for his affable manner and for organizing volleyball matches and poker games.


Stanford scholar uses digital tools to track grave relocation in China
A digital humanities project led by Stanford historian Tom Mullaney is creating a map that illustrates the ongoing and multifaceted impact of funeral reform and grave relocation in China.


Stanford Engineering: What does the great engineering school of the future look like?
Stanford School of Engineering charts a vision for the future across three critical areas: research, education and culture.


Stanford experts analyze North Korea's nuclear test and diplomatic solutions for curbing future nuclear experiments
Stanford nuclear policy experts say that economic sanctions alone might not be enough to curtail the country's nuclear program.


Stanford research explains why some people have more difficulty recovering from romantic breakups
Stanford psychologists found that rejection's impact lingers as "heavy baggage" when people who tend to see personality as fixed respond to the rejection by questioning their true self.


Odds are good that risky gambling choices are influenced by a single brain connection, Stanford research shows
Whether a person will place a risky bet comes down to a newly discovered tract of neurons spanning two brain regions. The findings could help understand and treat gambling or addiction disorders.


Oregon standoff latest protest in controversy over Western lands, Stanford experts say
Stanford law professors say the armed protestors in Oregon reflect a misreading of constitutional law and the history of federal land management in the West.


Stanford students take listeners on a voyage of discovery
Stanford students are producing audio documentaries based on interviews they recorded last summer with funding from Braden Storytelling Grants, which were designed to introduce students to the art of spoken storytelling.


At Stanford 2015: The Year in Review
A look back at the year that included visits by President Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey, a National Book Award winner, groundbreaking research, three national sports titles and more.


Stanford biologists show flexible gene expressions regulating social status in male fish
Scientists show how the selective expression of genes through epigenetics can regulate the social status of African cichlid fish. The work sheds light on how our genetic code might affect social relations.


Cardinal faithful kick off Rose Bowl festivities
The Stanford community's Cardinal spirit is on display as the faithful gather in Pasadena for Rose Bowl festivities.


Improved gun buyer background checks would impede some mass shootings, Stanford expert says
Stanford Law Professor John Donohue says a background check system that was universal and effectively operated could impede gun acquisition by people who commit mass shootings.


Stanford-based program trains indigenous leaders
The First Nations' Futures Institute celebrates 10 years of preparing young trailblazers to tackle environmental, economic, social and cultural challenges in their indigenous communities.


Cantor Arts Center at Stanford spotlights Richard Diebenkorn's sketchbooks
The exhibition, Richard Diebenkorn: The Sketchbooks Revealed, has been extended through Aug. 22, 2016, and all of the artist's sketchbooks are online via a new website. An extensive catalog has been published by Stanford University Press.


'Bad' inequality on the rise, Stanford scholar says
Rising inequality is primarily driven by market and institutional forces, Stanford sociologist David Grusky says. He suggests that changes in areas like education and labor markets can produce fair and open competition, thus reducing income and wealth inequality.


Stanford scientists look deeper into the body with new fluorescent dye
Glowing dyes help scientists see inside the body and diagnose ailments, but they needed a certain type of molecule to improve the imaging depth. They invented a long wavelength near-infrared fluorescent molecule, and it works.


Stanford scientists Albert Bandura and Stanley Falkow to receive the National Medal of Science
Two members of the Stanford faculty, Albert Bandura, an emeritus professor of psychology and Stanley Falkow, an emeritus professor of microbiology and immunology have been awarded the 2015 National Medal of Science.


Holiday comfort and joy at Stanford
As the year draws to a close, Stanford singers prepare for holiday concerts while around campus, students take a break from studying  to enjoy some holiday traditions.


Stanford scientists train computer models to accurately simulate nature's variability
A new method developed by Stanford Earth researchers uses training images to refine models of uncertainty about subsurface processes and structures.


Research shows how children can enjoy and succeed in math, Stanford expert says
Stanford Professor Jo Boaler says that research findings show how all students can learn to enjoy math and achieve at high levels without suffering from fear or failure.


New approach needed for governance of risky research, Stanford scholars say
The U.S. needs better oversight of risky biological research to reduce the likelihood of a bioengineered super virus escaping the lab.


Stanford researchers find world forest carbon stocks overestimated
Researchers with The Natural Capital Project show how fragmentation harms forests' ability to store carbon; more restoration is needed to reconnect forest patches.


Natural or manmade quakes? New Stanford technique can tell the difference
A study by Stanford geophysicists shows that earthquakes resulting from wastewater injection follow several indicative patterns that are starkly different from natural causes.


Stanford researchers develop microscope that allows look at live muscle units in action
The basic process of force-generation in muscle has been known for decades, but until now no one has ever seen it work at a microscopic level in a living human. The new microscope could provide unique insights into treating muscular degenerative diseases.


Stanford researchers study how to reduce deadly police force in Rio de Janeiro
Stanford researchers seek better strategies to control the lethal use of police force in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Their findings offer implications for police and communities elsewhere, as the researchers are studying how social and psychological factors affect police and how body-worn cameras can be used most efficiently.


Trustees discuss fossil fuels, quake preparedness
The Stanford University Board of Trustees gave design approval to a new campus in Redwood City, discussed its obligations to investment responsibility in light of student divestment requests, and heard presentations on earthquake preparedness, graduate education, athletics and new Law School programs.


Men's soccer team beats Clemson 4-0 to win first national title in more than 100 years
The Cardinal men's soccer team beat Clemson 4-0 to win its first national title in more than 100 years.


Stanford scientists crack mystery of the Sierra Nevada's age
Recent research by Stanford Earth scientists uses new techniques to shed light on the contentious history of California's iconic mountain range.


Stanford admits 745 early applicants to Class of 2020
The freshman class is beginning to take shape, with acceptance offers sent to high school students from 48 states and 34 countries.


Award-winning Stanford author Adam Johnson discusses the renaissance of the short story
Stanford English Professor Adam Johnson, recently the recipient of the National Book Award in fiction, weighs in on the power of the short story, the need for humor and the next generation of writers.


Terrorism drives nationalistic fervor in presidential politics, Stanford sociologist says
Stanford sociologist Robb Willer says terrorism generally serves to sharpen national boundaries and increase nationalist spirit. However, scholars are largely in uncharted territory in regard to how terrorism will affect the 2016 presidential campaign, as prior research has focused primarily on incumbent officeholders.


Stanford University reports FY 2015 financial results


Stanford team develops software to predict and prevent drone collisions
How do we prevent collisions when thousands of drones are flying in congested areas? A software-enabled system could play the role of an autonomous air traffic manager for unmanned flights.


From CourseWork to Canvas: Stanford embarks on a major transition in learning platforms
With today's launch of a new learning management platform, the university's faculty and instructional staff gain new tools for advancing their teaching.


Stanford engineers invent process to accelerate protein evolution
A new tool enables researchers to test millions of mutated proteins in a matter of hours or days, speeding the search for new medicines, industrial enzymes and biosensors.


Global fossil-fuel emissions could decline in 2015, Stanford-led study finds
An international research team reports that the rapid increase in global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels has slowed in the past two years.


Stanford professor connects American authors to the places that inspired them
From Minnesota to Texas, Frederick Douglass to Walt Whitman, Stanford English Professor Shelley Fisher Fishkin guides readers through the sites that shaped our greatest writers.


U.S. Senate report on CIA torture flawed on several fronts, Stanford scholar says
Stanford political scientist Amy Zegart says the U.S. Senate's 2014 summary report on alleged CIA torture and interrogation during the "war on terror" contains errors and weaknesses that only served to weaken its ultimate influence.


Stanford fans celebrate the Pac-12 Football Championship
Cardinal fans cheered the football team to a 41-22 victory over USC to win the 2015 Pac-12 Championship at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif., on Saturday. Stanford photographers captured highlights of the event.


Stanford's Philosophy Department trains leaders, thinkers
Using tools of thinking, the program explores life's fundamental questions.


Stanford scientists solve mystery of arsenic release into groundwater
Bacteria living in shallow sediment layers of permanently flooded wetlands in Asia drive arsenic release into water by feeding on freshly deposited plant material, a new study finds.


Faculty Senate tours Stanford's new energy facility
The senate held its last meeting of fall quarter in the university's new Central Energy Facility, which opened with great fanfare last spring.


Stanford scientists develop 'Shazam for earthquakes'
A new algorithm designed to find matching seismic signals in large earthquake databases could find previously missed microquakes.


At Stanford, Fed official urges cautious approach to rate hikes
Lael Brainard, a governor of the Federal Reserve, explained at a SIEPR event why interest rates likely will remain low for years to come.


Prospects brighten for China-Taiwan relationship, Stanford's Asia experts say
The November meeting of Chinese leader Xi Jinping and Taiwanese President Ma Ying-Jeou will have at least one lasting effect as Taiwan elections loom in January.


Physicist presides over Stanford's Faculty Senate
Kathryn A. Moler, who earned a bachelor's degree and a doctorate in physics at Stanford and joined the faculty in 1998, is the chair of this year's Faculty Senate. The senate's final meeting of the quarter will be held Dec. 3.


Stanford professor explores transformative relationships in new story collection
Stanford English Professor Elizabeth Tallent addresses how relationships shape our identity in her latest collection of short stories.


Biologists at Stanford develop novel antiviral approach to dengue fever
By targeting fundamental cellular machinery, the antiviral approach developed in Judith Frydman's lab at Stanford could provide a roadmap to preventing infections that affect hundreds of millions of people every year.


Stanford study finds promise in expanding renewables based on results in three major economies
A new Stanford study found that renewable energy can make a major and increasingly cost-effective contribution to alleviating climate change.


Stanford physicists use photons to carry messages from electrons over a distance of 1.2 miles
By using photons to communicate between two electrons through more than a mile of fiber optic cable, physicists have taken an important step toward proving the practicality of quantum networks.


Stanford senior named 2016 Marshall Scholar
Senior Alejandro Ruizesparza said he will use the Marshall Scholarship to study social statistics and sociology at the University of Glasgow in Scotland.


Stanford engineers develop 'invisible wires' that could improve solar cell efficiency
Making the electrical wiring on top of solar cells nearly invisible to incoming light, using silicon nanopillars to hide the wires, could dramatically boost solar-cell efficiency.


Culture factors into why we like or dislike people, new Stanford research shows
Stanford psychologist Jeanne Tsai found different cultures value different positive facial expressions, and that these differences arise in deep brain circuits that can predict who people like and dislike.


Stanford physicists use photons to carry messages from electrons 1.2 miles apart
By using photons to communicate between two electrons through more than a mile of fiber optic cable, physicists have taken an important step toward proving the practicality of quantum networks.


Textbooks inaccurately present science on climate change as uncertain and doubtful, Stanford research shows
Stanford research shows that some California science textbooks by major publishers portray climate change as a debate over different opinions rather than as scientific fact.


Stanford researcher suggests storing solar energy underground for a cloudy day
Stanford researcher Mark Z. Jacobson's proposal addresses the issue of how to affordably store wind, water and solar power.


Biologists trace how human innovation impacts tool evolution
Professor Marcus Feldman's lab has devised a computer model that could help solve a long-standing mystery over why the introduction of new tools in prehistoric societies sometimes comes in periodic bursts.


Stanford cybersecurity expert Herb Lin analyzes Anonymous' hacking attacks on ISIS
By hacking ISIS, Anonymous could throw a wrench into the terror group's activities, and although this type of vigilante-style hacking is illegal in the United States, it's doubtful that anyone would be punished.


Stanford historian uncovers the historical origins of the gay suicide stereotype
Stanford doctoral student Samuel Clowes Huneke's research traces the history of the gay suicide trope from its roots in 20th-century Germany to its insidious prevalence in modern American pop culture.


Stanford students put computer science skills to social good
Four undergraduates have co-founded CS+Social Good, an organization that utilizes technology to make a positive social impact.


Adam Johnson wins National Book Award
Stanford English professor and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Adam Johnson earns a 2015 National Book Award for Fortune Smiles, a collection of short stories.


Stanford's newest open space – Meyer Green – opens Tuesday
Meyer Green, a 2.45-acre open space, is located close to several university landmarks, including Green Library, Sweet Hall and the Graduate School of Education.


The less powerful are more generous with trust than the powerful, Stanford research reveals
Stanford sociologist Karen Cook found that people with less power want their more powerful partners in negotiations to be trustworthy and act according to that desire.


Students continue Building 10 demonstration
Student demonstrators associated with Fossil Free Stanford continued their sit-in around Building 10 on the Main Quad for the second day on Tuesday.


Provost Etchemendy addresses questions about sexual assault


Stanford designs underwater solar cells that turn captured greenhouse gases into fuel
Taking a cue from plants, researchers figure out how to use the sun's energy to combine CO2 with H2O to create benign chemical products, as part of a futuristic technology called artificial photosynthesis.


Stanford astronomers observe the birth of an alien planet
The newly found 'protoplanet' is 450 light years away, but observing how it collects matter and grows could answer some of the biggest questions concerning how our solar system formed.


Henry S. Rowen, Stanford business professor and U.S. policymaker, dies at 90
Henry S. Rowen, an American policymaker and economist at Stanford, died on Nov. 12 at the age of 90. He was a leading scholar on U.S. and Asian economic growth and a national security expert.


At Stanford, vigil held for terror victims in Paris, Beirut and Baghdad
Some 200 members of the Stanford community braved cold and wind to stand in solidarity Sunday night with victims of the recent Islamic State terrorist attacks in Paris, Beirut and Baghdad.


At Stanford, vigil held for terror victims in Paris and Beirut
Some 200 members of the Stanford community braved cold and wind to stand in solidarity Sunday night with victims of the recent Islamic State terrorist attacks in Paris and Beirut.


Kingscote Gardens renovation planned
The historic Kingscote Gardens apartment building, located off Lagunita Drive next to the Faculty Club, will be renovated to primarily accommodate student services offices.


Stanford researchers uncover patterns in how scientists lie about their data
When scientists falsify data, they try to cover it up by writing differently in their published works. A pair of Stanford researchers have devised a way of identifying these written clues.


Tough enough: Stanford and IBM test the limits of toughness in nanocomposites
By slipping springy polystyrene molecules between layers of tough yet brittle composites, researchers made materials stronger and more flexible, in the process demonstrating the theoretical limits of how far this toughening technique could go.


Russia seeks to demonstrate military prowess in Syria, Stanford scholar says
Political scientist Kathryn Stoner does not expect a new Cold War between the U.S. and Russia over the Syrian conflict. But Russia is clearly sending a message it wants to be a global power again, she says.


Stanford conference calls for more women in data science
A recent gathering at Stanford on the emerging science of big data turned the usual gender ratio of science conferences on its head.


Stanford's Cantor Arts Center digitizes collection for online database
The 6-year project provides free access for scholars and art lovers alike to both the works on view and the 95 percent of the collection held in storage.


Trans-Pacific Partnership may produce import competition, Stanford scholar says
Stanford economist Michael Boskin says the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership should expand trade and increase growth in the U.S., though some businesses and workers may encounter stiffer competition from imported goods.


Artistic works influence our minds and nervous systems, Stanford scholar reveals
Stanford theater historian Matthew Wilson Smith's new research shows how 19th century brain science has nerved its way into the drama of our lives, both onstage and off.


Karlheinz Merkle to receive Stanford's 2015 Marsh O'Neill Award
Merkle, who supervises the Physics Machine Shop, has won the annual prize given to staff members who have made outstanding contributions to Stanford's research mission.


Deborah Stipek named Haas Center faculty director
Deborah Stipek, former dean of the Graduate School of Education, will become faculty director of the Haas Center for Public Service in fall 2016, succeeding Larry Diamond and Julie Kennedy.


New "tricorder" technology might be able to "hear" tumors growing
A new technology has promise to safely find buried plastic explosives and maybe even spot fast-growing tumors. The technique involves the clever interplay of microwaves and ultrasound to develop a detector like the Star Trek tricorder.


University seeks input on proposed updated judicial process for sexual assault
The Stanford community is invited to comment on a proposed updated process, recommended by a campus task force, for investigating and adjudicating cases of prohibited sexual conduct involving students.


Stanford researchers develop new way to measure crop yields from space
A Stanford-led team has used satellites to measure a special light emitted by plants to estimate crop yields with more accuracy than ever before.


Three Stanford professors honored by Breakthrough Prize Foundation
Karl Deisseroth has been awarded a $3 million Breakthrough Prize in life science for his pioneering work in optogenetics. Stanford Physicists Xiao-Liang Qi and Leonardo Senatore won New Horizons in Physics Prizes for their outstanding contributions to fundamental physics.


Stanford scholars spy history of capitalist culture in Bond film songs
A musicologist and a literary scholar find a unique window into the evolution of capitalism and changing attitudes toward work in 50 years of James Bond movie theme songs.


NCAA reports Stanford Athletics registered overall graduation rate of 98 percent
The latest Graduation Success Rate report released by the NCAA notes that 19 Cardinal programs earned a 100 percent graduation rate.


Stanford performances and symposium highlight architecture
Stanford continues to be the "it" place for architecture with upcoming dance performances on Nov. 7-8 and a symposium on Nov. 13 with international experts.


Stanford Engineering: Driven by desire to have an impact on the world
The speakers at the Faculty Senate meeting yesterday included Professor Persis Drell, dean of the School of Engineering, and Professor Andrew Fire, chair of the Ad Hoc Faculty Committee on IT Privacy and Security.


World Bank chief tells Stanford audience that ending extreme poverty is possible
World Bank leader Jim Yong Kim spoke at Stanford last Thursday, urging students and faculty to continue their efforts to eliminate poverty and improve public health globally.


Faculty Senate to convene on Thursday
At Thursday's meeting, the Faculty Senate will hear presentations on the School of Engineering; academic computing and information systems; and IT privacy.


Stanford professor and eminent French theorist René Girard dies at 91
A member of the prestigious Académie Française, René Girard was called "the new Darwin of the human sciences." His many books offered a bold, sweeping vision of human nature, human history and human destiny. He died Nov. 4 at 91.


Novelist warns Stanford audience against utilitarian trends in higher education
In the 2015 Presidential Lecture in the Arts and Humanities, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Marilynne Robinson argued that if the American higher education system continues to shift priorities towards training instead of educating, students will be ill-equipped to participate as citizens of a democratic society.


Stanford engineers help discover the surprising trick jellyfish use to swim
A Stanford-led team shows how these ancient creatures' undulating motions cause water to pull them along. This counterintuitive insight could spur new designs for energy-efficient underwater craft.


Discovery in the data: Stanford's data journalism program advances the storytelling form
Stanford's data journalism program blends the power of big data with journalistic training in the craft of storytelling. Students and faculty are crossing disciplines to enhance the way news stories are told in the digital age.


California's early release of prisoners proving effective so far, Stanford experts say
Stanford legal scholars say that California's early release of prisoners has not resulted in a rise in crime. To reduce the imprisonment rates, policymakers need to focus on rehabilitation, crime prevention and root causes of crime such as wealth inequality and poor public education.


Stanford author explores the idiosyncratic process of writing
Stanford lecturer and author Hilton Obenzinger hosted a series of dialogues with writers at Stanford from 2002 to 2015, exploring the sometimes quirky ways in which writers approach their craft.


Stanford puts the spotlight on quieting the busy mind
A series of events, "Contemplation by Design," kicks off Nov. 4 with the goal of slowing down the thinking mind and refreshing the inner self. The effort is aimed at helping boost individual well-being as well as the campus community's sense of discovery and rejuvenation.


Stanford issues statement on climate change ahead of Paris conference
With an international conference on climate change approaching, Stanford issues a call for global leaders to look to universities for solutions – and highlights steps Stanford has taken to implement sustainable practices.


Through European Security Initiative, Stanford focuses on changing geopolitical landscape
The new European Security Initiative at Stanford will examine the long-term policy issues and trends in Europe's changing geopolitical landscape, especially given Russia's growing aggression in the region.


Targeted policy actions could help discourage obesity, Stanford expert says
Stanford law Professor Deborah Rhode suggests that a societal strategy involving public awareness, new taxes, enhanced zoning regulations and tougher restrictions on food marketing and packaging could alleviate the obesity epidemic.


Lure of the Farm: Stanford alumni celebrate Reunion Homecoming
As nearly 7,000 alumni return to campus, Stanford photographers capture some of the long-weekend highlights.


Stanford course provides opportunity for students to see textbook methods in action
Pilot program was designed to first ground students in the basics of empirical research, then provide an opportunity to apply that knowledge while conducting fieldwork in an international setting.


Stanford's new Raw Data podcast analyzes consequences of big data, cyber-technologies
The Raw Data podcast opens a conversation about how big data and networked technologies are changing communities, the economy, politics and human behavior.


Stanford conservationists provide TLC for damaged treasures
Stanford Libraries' conservation lab repairs precious artifacts and puts them back in researchers' hands. Technicians also create cases that provide a secure future for everything from paper fans to "Andy," a programmable robot.


New graduate housing proposed for Escondido Village
Stanford is in the very early stages of proposing construction of a new residential complex that would provide housing for more than 2,400 graduate students. If eventually approved, the complex would be located off Serra Street between El Camino Real and Campus Drive.


Naturalized immigrants more politically integrated citizens, Stanford research shows
Stanford political scientist Jens Hainmueller found that naturalization for immigrants leads to better political participation and greater knowledge about their new country.


Senate discusses learning goals and new course evaluations
The speakers at the Oct. 22 Faculty Senate meeting included Russell Berman, German studies and comparative literature; Jim Campbell, history; Susan McConnell, biology; and Sheri Sheppard, mechanical engineering.


Graphene key to dense, energy-efficient memory chips, Stanford engineers say
Only an atom thick, graphene is a key ingredient in three Stanford projects to create data storage technologies that use nanomaterials other than standard silicon.


Making educated choices about health care during Open Enrollment
Comprehensive information about medical, dental and vision plans for 2016 is now available.


Introducing MARTY, Stanford's self-driving, electric, drifting DeLorean
Stanford engineers built an autonomous DeLorean capable of stable, precise drifting at large angles in order to study how cars perform in extreme situations.


Stanford's Reunion Homecoming opens Thursday
The annual event, which is expected to attract nearly 9,500 alumni and family members, takes place Oct. 22-25.


Stanford researchers' calculations reveal high global economic cost of climate change
Stanford-Cal collaboration finds that without climate change mitigation, even wealthy countries will see an economic downturn by 2100.


Faculty Senate to discuss new course evaluations Thursday
Professor Russell Berman, who served as chair of Stanford's Course Evaluation Committee, will present a report on the new evaluations. Following his presentation, a faculty panel will discuss learning goals.


Work and family life at Stanford: Celebrating decades of support
Stanford's WorkLife Office is dedicated to supporting employees as they work to achieve and maintain a healthy balance in their personal and professional lives. For decades Stanford has developed an evolving portfolio of family programs designed to meet the changing needs of employees.


'Thinking Big' presenters inspire at Stanford's 125th anniversary kickoff symposium
Some of education's best minds came together on Sunday and shared research and discoveries that are transforming the way we think about and approach teaching, learning and education.


Stanford students race across Australian Outback in sun-powered car
Cruising comfortably at 50 mph, a solar-powered car built by a team of Stanford engineering students is facing off against cars built by engineers from around the world in the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge in Australia.


New Stanford exhibition incorporates consultation with Native American communities
The new Stanford exhibition, "From 'Curios' to Ambassadors: Changing Roles of the Daggett Collection from Tribes of the Lower Klamath River," highlights Native American tribal objects in a way that more precisely reflects their origins. It is on view through June 4, 2016.


Stanford invites faculty to customize new course evaluations
The university has created a new course evaluation form that faculty members can customize by identifying the learning goals of the course and adding questions of their own. The deadline for faculty to customize course evaluations for autumn quarter is Nov. 13.


Stanford grad's trek on the edge of wilderness
Zachary Brown defended his thesis, then traveled 2,300 miles by foot and by kayak to establish an Alaskan field school, where he hopes to inspire the next generation's understanding of the environment.


Stanford engineers create artificial skin that can send pressure sensation to brain cell
Stanford engineers have created a plastic skin-like material that can detect pressure and deliver a Morse code-like signal directly to a living brain cell.


Climate change requires new conservation models, Stanford scientists say
In a world transformed by climate change and human activity, Stanford scientists say that conserving biodiversity and protecting species will require an interdisciplinary combination of ecological and social research methods.


MOOCs haven't lived up to the hopes and the hype, Stanford participants say
Massive online classes for virtually everyone were supposed to change the world of education, but it hasn't worked out that way yet, say three Stanford professors who have been involved since the beginning.


Stanford project offers insights on unfunded public pension liabilities in California
Stanford researcher Joe Nation's new project offers a wealth of information about unfunded pension liabilities in California's cities, counties and special districts.


New website reveals PhD career paths for Stanford alumni
A new website that tracks the career paths of Stanford PhDs is now available for use by faculty, current students and prospective students. The website reflects the results of a two-year study that showed a great deal of employment diversity among doctoral graduates.


Stanford suspends Istanbul Program due to security concerns
The university hopes to renew the program next year, if the situation improves in Turkey.


Stanford study shows effects of toilet facilities on child health in rural Africa
Scientists have evaluated the health impact of sanitation by measuring rates of diarrheal disease. A new study shows that child growth improves after communities add toilet facilities.


Susan Rice describes threat of catastrophic climate change in Stanford speech
U.S. national security adviser Susan Rice visited Stanford on Monday to advocate global and U.S. action on climate change.


New approach could help reduce bias in research, Stanford scholar says
Stanford law Professor Robert MacCoun writes in a new journal article that "blind analysis" could decrease bias in higher education research. In blind analysis, researchers analyzing data cannot see the true results until they have completed the research.


Stanford trustees celebrate McMurtry Building, hear presentations on a variety of topics
At its recent meeting, the Stanford University Board of Trustees toured the new McMurtry Building for the Department of Art & Art History, heard presentations from university leaders, approved the design of the Bass Biology Building, and approved construction plans to build a new conference center and to renovate a graduate housing complex.


Stanford sociologist shows how to make effective political arguments
Stanford sociologist Robb Willer finds that an effective way to persuade people in politics is to reframe arguments to appeal to the moral values of those holding opposing positions.


Stanford's newest building spotlights art and art history
The McMurtry Building, the new home of the Department of Art & Art History, offers new studios and classrooms for the students as well as new galleries and views for the community.


University Terrace information session scheduled today for Stanford faculty
Faculty members will be brought up to date on the construction of 180 new homes off California Avenue, some of which may be ready as soon as 2017. Purchase of the new homes will be limited to Stanford faculty.


Rewarding good behavior of prisoners is a benefit to society, Stanford expert says
Stanford law Professor A. Mitchell Polinsky found that rewarding good behavior of prisoners, with reduced sentences or parole, decreases costs for society without increasing crime.


New home of the Stanford Department of Art & Art History is an adventure
The McMurtry Building at Stanford University offers new studios and classrooms for the students as well as new galleries and views for the community.


Stanford students spend summer seeking environmental solutions
A unique grant program provides mentorship for students doing solutions-oriented environmental fieldwork around the world and vital research assistance for faculty.


Stanford students package 63,000 meals for the hungry
Event introduces freshmen and transfer students to public service as a distinctive feature of a Stanford education.


Military historian Andrew Bacevich to deliver the 2015 Tanner Lectures at Stanford
This year's Tanner Lectures on Human Values will be headlined by Andrew J. Bacevich, who will discuss the origins, conduct and consequences of U.S. military involvement in the Greater Middle East.


University to conduct test of AlertSU on Oct. 8
The university encourages all members of the Stanford community to verify and update their contact information, particularly in the mobile phone field, at least 24 hours before the Oct. 8 test.


Battery experiments highlight Stanford's dual mission
Teaching and research come together when a PhD student guides an undergraduate through two years of tests that confound two decades of assumptions on lithium-ion battery design.


2015 Bright Award recipient guides corporate leaders to more sustainable practices
Polly Courtice, director of the University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership, was honored Tuesday at Stanford Law School with the 2015 Stanford Bright Award for her efforts in guiding thousands of business leaders to more sustainable business practices.


Stanford releases results of campus climate survey of students
Results of a campus climate survey taken by undergraduate and graduate students in spring 2015 show Stanford has "much more work to do in battling sexual assault and misconduct," President John Hennessy said.


2015 Bright Award recipient guides corporate leaders to more sustainable business practices
Polly Courtice, director of the University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership, was honored Tuesday at Stanford Law School with the 2015 Stanford Bright Award for her efforts in guiding thousands of business leaders to more sustainable business practices.


Stanford, other institutions to offer new 'Coalition Application'
The coalition's goal is to recast the admission process, broaden access and encourage a "college-going mindset" for all students beginning their freshman year in high school.


Battery experiments highlight Stanford's dual mission of teaching and research
A Stanford PhD student guides an undergraduate through two years of tests that confound two decades of assumptions on lithium-ion battery design. The findings could lead to better batteries, while the research process works hand-in-glove with teaching.


New Stanford investment responsibility structure aims for clarity, responsiveness


Stanford scholar suggests ways to craft more effective homework assignments
Stanford education expert Denise Pope says that the quality of a homework assignment  can have a significant impact on student achievement and health.  


Tension helps heart cells develop normally in the lab, according to Stanford engineers
Scientists have discovered that getting stem cells to mimic normal adult heart cells – a critical step for eventually using them to test drugs – requires tension and a specific shape.


Stanford explores the future of higher education and teaching during the Year of Learning
Stanford will explore the art and science of teaching and learning in 2015-16 with the Year of Learning initiative. To kick off the Year of Learning, innovative Stanford faculty will share their techniques and projects at the Great Teaching Showcase event on Oct. 2.


Stanford computer scientist Christopher Ré named MacArthur fellow
Stanford's Christopher Ré, an assistant professor of computer science, has been awarded a "genius grant" from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.


Stanford submits new plans for Menlo Park development
Stanford's revised plans for 500 El Camino Real in Menlo Park feature a public plaza, reduced office space, additional housing and space for restaurants and retailers.


Stanford kicks off 125th anniversary celebration with 'Big Thinkers' symposium
The first in a series of events marking Stanford's 125th year, "Thinking Big About Learning" brings together the greatest minds in education to talk about their current research and discoveries.


Stanford biologists crack centuries-old mystery of how cell growth triggers cell division
Researchers in Jan Skotheim's lab have discovered a previously unknown mechanism that controls how large cells grow, an insight that could one day provide insight into attacking diseases such as cancer.


Democracy still holds promise globally, though in retreat for now, Stanford expert says
Stanford scholar Larry Diamond says that it was probably inevitable that freedom and democracy would level off after roughly 30 years of nearly continuous expansion.


Faculty Senate: Encouraging active listening, engagement
The Stanford Faculty Senate on Sept. 24 discussed OpenXChange, a new campus initiative aimed at encouraging open and meaningful discourse on important issues across the Stanford community.


Stanford provost announces Bass University Fellows in Undergraduate Education
The program recognizes faculty for extraordinary contributions to undergraduate education.


Stanford scientists help discover Pacific bluefin tunas' favorite feeding spots
Stanford scientists devise a new methodology for measuring how and when ocean predators consume prey, and identify the Pacific bluefin's favorite hot spots, information that can inform conservation strategies.


Stanford Band debuts new weeping willow Tree design
Sarah Young, this year's Tree, has created a weeping willow design for her mascot costume. Like Trees before her, she made the costume herself. Videographer Kurt Hickman chronicles the process of becoming the Tree.


Stanford Health Care president, CEO to step down at the end of 2015


Distinctive contexts critical to how children learn words, Stanford study reveals
Stanford psychologist Michael Frank says that children learn words best when they are used in a context that's understandable. Using words in fun, coherent activities is more important than just talking more to children.


Stanford study indicates school meals may expose children to unsafe levels of BPA
Researcher finds that school meals can contain unsafe levels of a toxic chemical, putting low-income students particularly at risk.


Stanford engineers invent transparent coating that cools solar cells to boost efficiency
The hotter solar cells become, the less efficient they are at converting sunlight to electricity, a problem that has long vexed the solar industry. Now, Stanford engineers have developed a transparent overlay that increases efficiency by cooling the cells even in full sunlight.


Stanford team re-engineers virus to deliver therapies to cells
Researchers stripped a virus of its infectious machinery and turned its benign core into a delivery vehicle that can target sick cells while leaving healthy tissue alone.


New director of Stanford economic institution puts focus on research, students and policy
Stanford economist Mark Duggan this month took the reins of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research as its new director. He aims to get students even more involved with faculty research, and plans to further expand efforts at communicating SIEPR scholarship to policymakers.


Stanford Management Company releases 2015 results


Stanford's Another Look book club reborn with J.L. Carr's 'A Month in the Country'
Another Look book club takes on J.L. Carr's 1980 masterpiece, 'A Month in the Country,' under the new leadership of author Robert Pogue Harrison.


Global warming 'hiatus' never happened, Stanford scientists say
A new study reveals that the evidence for a recent pause in the rate of global warming lacks a sound statistical basis.


Legal, ethical response needed on Mideast refugee crisis, Stanford expert says
Stanford law Professor James Cavallaro said Europe should follow established international law on Middle East refugees and create new approaches that respond to the crisis in a humanitarian way.


Convocation: What it means to be part of Stanford
Drawing on inspiration from some of the world's greatest leaders and thinkers, Stanford President John Hennessy urged incoming students to open their minds, expand their horizons and follow their passions during their time at Stanford.


Stanford researchers look to stormwater as a solution for semiarid regions
Coordinated work with local and federal agencies could provide a template for capture and reuse of stormwater in dry regions such as the American West.


Stanford launches initiative to strengthen commitment to public service
A new initiative, Cardinal Service, builds on the university's longstanding commitment to public service by elevating and expanding opportunities to weave service more deeply into the distinctive identity and culture of the Stanford student experience.


The Oval expands 'A' permit parking; visitor parking moves to Roth Way
Visitor parking price changes go into effect on Sept. 21 and Oct. 1.


Stanford scientists discover key mechanism in gene expression
RNA polymerase II makes life possible by expressing genes. Now, a team of Stanford biologists, chemists and applied physicists has observed it at work in real time.


Stanford to welcome 1,737 freshmen and transfer students on Tuesday
Stanford's incoming students all have a bit of acclimating to do, which is what the six days of New Student Orientation are all about.


Garth Saloner to step down as dean of the Stanford Graduate School of Business


Neighborhoods influence use of African American Vernacular, Stanford research shows
Among African American youth, moving from a poor neighborhood to one with less poverty results in a lower use of African American Vernacular English, new Stanford research shows.


Letter from President John Hennessy and Provost John Etchemendy announcing launch of OpenXChange initiative
The goal of the year-long initiative is to strengthen the Stanford community through purposeful engagement.


Stanford scientists see how the brain makes environmental decisions
Brain scans reveal that negative emotional responses can powerfully drive decisions to protect environmental resources.


Charting new intellectual, personal pathways at Stanford
The first cohort of fellows in Stanford's Distinguished Careers Institute described the program as invigorating, exciting and enriching, and "a real gift."


El Niño increasing likelihood of wet winter, Stanford scientists say
But it might not be enough to end California's worst drought on record, say Earth scientists Noah Diffenbaugh and Daniel Swain.


BEAM, Stanford Career Education, reflects new focus on connections and meaningful work
Career educators at BEAM connect with students – undergraduates as well as graduate students – to help them explore career paths, identify and apply for opportunities, and cultivate personalized networks that shape their professional journeys.


Public pensions falling short of rosy investment assumptions, Stanford scholar says
Researcher David Crane says tax revenue is being diverted from services when pensions fall short of projections.


Stanford, Toyota to collaborate on AI research effort; Fei-Fei Li to direct new center
Led by Associate Professor Fei-Fei Li, the new SAIL-Toyota Center for AI Research will focus on teaching computers to see and make critical decisions about how to interact with the world. At the outset, research will address intelligent robotics and autonomous cars.


Stanford soil sleuths solve mystery of arsenic-contaminated water
Stanford Earth scientist Scott Fendorf helped discover how trace amounts of arsenic were moving from sediments into groundwater aquifers in Southern California.


Ice sheets may be more resilient than thought, say Stanford scientists
Stanford study suggests that today's ice sheets may be more resilient to increased carbon dioxide levels than previously thought.


National security faces challenges from insider threats, Stanford scholar says
Amy Zegart says insider threats are rooted in organizational inflexibility. She examines lessons learned from 2009 Fort Hood terrorist attack.


Stanford, Toyota to collaborate on AI research effort
Led by Associate Professor Fei-Fei Li, the new SAIL-Toyota Center for AI Research will focus on teaching computers to see and make critical decisions about how to interact with the world. At the outset, research will address intelligent robotics and autonomous cars.


Most sensors designed to measure head impacts in sports produce inaccurate data, Stanford bioengineers find
As scientists zero in on the skull motions that can cause concussions, David Camarillo's lab has found that many commercially available sensors worn by athletes to gather this data are prone to significant error.


Summer job makes a difference in classroom learning, Stanford scholar says
Stanford researcher Jacob Leos-Urbel found that summer jobs for young people have positive impacts on academic performance, especially for students who work jobs across multiple summers.


Nathan Rosenberg, Stanford professor and expert on the economic history of technology, dead at 87
Nathan Rosenberg, the Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor of Public Policy, Emeritus, in Stanford's Department of Economics, died Aug. 24 at the Vi at Palo Alto, at the age of 87.


Stanford scholar discovers unknown Magna Carta scribe
Manuscript expert Elaine Treharne shows  that one of the world's most famous documents was written not by the king's scribes, but by a cathedral scribe outside the central court.


Stanford engineers find secret to steady drone cameras in swans
By solving how whooper swans keep their heads steady during flapping flight, Stanford engineers have developed a camera suspension system that could allow drones to produce crisper video images.


Stanford philosopher strengthens Kant's connection to natural science and Newton
Research by philosophy Professor Michael Friedman reveals how a lesser-known Kantian text serves as an important bridge between Kant's concepts of metaphysics and natural science, as well as between defining periods in Kant's development.


Stanford scholar finds social media reveals much about the human condition
Graduate School of Business' Michal Kosinski says our most intimate traits and core personality can be deciphered through our digital footprints. In fact, social media over the long run reveals information closer to our true selves than what we present in brief face-to-face interactions.


Stanford FEED Collaborative applies design thinking to food system
Sustainability promoted from local farms through distributors to consumers.


Stanford historian says falsified medieval history helped create feminism
Through research into the first historians of medieval Europe, Professor Paula Findlen discovers that an interest in women's history began much earlier than is assumed.


Cybersecurity boot camp draws congressional staffers to Stanford
A bipartisan group of Capitol Hill staffers were in Silicon Valley last week to gain an immersion into the complex world of cybersecurity. The range of experts they heard from included tech industry leaders, scholars representing a range of disciplines and former government officials.


Biomedical innovation takes off in India, with Stanford roots
A program that blends India's frugal mindset with Stanford's entrepreneurial atmosphere has generated low-cost solutions to high-tech medical needs.


Stanford researchers find surprising level of tick-borne disease risk on local trails
Study reveals mysterious pathogen in higher concentrations than thought in trailside ticks in the San Francisco Bay Area.


This is only a test: Stanford-SLAC emergency drill tests response to crisis
Volunteers, first responders, and local fire and law enforcement officials took part in an emergency drill to test responsiveness to a hypothetical crisis.


Resilience is the theme of Stanford's summer reading program for incoming students
Members of the Class of 2019 are reading books selected by President John Hennessy. The Three Books program serves as an intellectual springboard for freshmen and transfer students.


Smile boosts chances of getting a microloan, say Stanford psychologists
Applicants for microloans are more likely to win approval if the photograph they send along with the application evokes a positive emotional response.


Stanford sociologist urges rethinking of sex and gender in surveys
New research reveals that most social surveys are not measuring what surveyors think is being measured when it comes to sex and gender.


Stanford research shows how to improve science students' critical thinking
Physicists at the University of British Columbia and Stanford have found that encouraging students to repeatedly make decisions about data collected during introductory lab courses improves their critical thinking skills.


Stanford engineers develop wireless device to stimulate nerves in mice
A blue glowing device the size of a peppercorn can activate neurons of the brain, spinal cord or limbs in mice and is powered wirelessly using the mouse's own body to transfer energy. Developed by a Stanford Bio-X team, the device is the first to deliver optogenetic nerve stimulation in a fully implantable format.


Russian policy toward Afghanistan unsettled, Stanford scholar says
Stanford political scientist Kathryn Stoner says that Russia does not want U.S. military forces to stay in Afghanistan, but also does not want their withdrawal to leave behind chaos and an extremist Muslim threat.


Stanford's Knight Management Center reopens after bomb threat
No bomb was found, but out of an abundance of caution, the eight buildings of the business school campus were evacuated for the day.


Stanford police seek information on vandalism of Angel of Grief
Police recently received a report that someone had broken off the front left forearm of the monument.


Astronomers discover 'young Jupiter' exoplanet
The first planet detected by the Gemini Planet Imager is 100 light-years away but shares many of the characteristics of an early Jupiter. Stanford physics Professor Bruce Macintosh explains how this planet could help us understand how solar systems form.


Stanford researchers genetically engineer yeast to produce opioids
It typically takes a year to produce hydrocodone from plants, but Christina Smolke and colleagues have genetically modified yeast to make it in just a few days. The technique could improve access to medicines in impoverished nations, and later be used to develop treatments for other diseases.


China's currency responding more closely to market forces, Stanford scholars say
Stanford experts say that China devalued its currency to help spur exports, growth and employment. It wants its currency to become a pre-eminent one in the global economy.


Stanford conservators work to preserve Rodin Sculpture Garden
To fend off corrosion from dust, UV light radiation and acid rain, conservators wash and wax the sculptures to preserve their patina.


Stanford's Branner Earth Sciences Library marks its centennial
The private library of Stanford's first geology professor, John Casper Branner, was the foundation on which the Branner Earth Sciences Library & Map Collections was built. A case of memorabilia is on display at the library through September.


Stanford Techie Festival starts Monday, Aug. 17
Instructors are eager to share tips, tricks and best practices – and to answer questions – at the Seventh Annual Techie Festival, Aug. 17-28. With 19 classes to choose from, it's a great way for learners to get the training they need and use STAP funds before the end of the fiscal year.


Members of Presidential Search Committee announced; Isaac Stein will chair


Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project awards $9.3 million for research
GCEP has awarded scientists at Stanford and four other universities funding to develop a suite of promising energy technologies.


Political affiliation factors into choosing where to live, Stanford expert says
Stanford scholar Iris Hui found that political party affiliation can change desirability of a residential location by as much as 20 percent. As a result, legislative districts may become more lopsided, creating more partisan legislatures.


Stanford scholar digs deep into human history at Neolithic site
Stanford archaeologist Ian Hodder is unraveling the origins of the human story at the 9,000-year-old Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey.


Stanford historian Robert Conquest, expert on Soviet Union, dies at 98
A Renaissance-style thinker, Robert Conquest was a prolific Soviet historian who became the conscience of an era in the war of ideas between communism and Western democracy. As a poet, his work was considered among the most influential in British literary circles.


John Henry Merryman, Stanford art law pioneer, dies at 95
An internationally renowned expert on art and cultural property law as well as comparative law, Merryman dedicated his life to the study and teaching of law at Stanford.


Stanford scholar illuminates history of disputed China Sea islands
Friction between China and Japan over sovereignty for the resource-rich Diaoyu Islands has escalated in recent years. Research by Stanford graduate student Xiang Zhai reveals new details about the dispute that might help resolve it.


Stanford expert endorses push for federal prison sentencing reform
Stanford School of Law Professor David Sklansky advocates overhauling federal prison sentencing guidelines that have locked up millions of Americans – many of them young black men – for nonviolent crimes. One big problem is the proliferation of mandatory minimum sentencing laws.


Stanford parking structures are getting new names
By the end of August, the names of parking garages on campus will reflect their locations – a nearby street, field, building or center – to make them easier to find on maps and on campus.


Stanford scientists rescue genetic material from formaldehyde
Formaldehyde is excellent for preserving cellular structures, but it makes it difficult to pull genetic information from tissue samples. Eric Kool and colleagues have developed a catalyst that saves RNA, which could lead to better patient outcomes.


New U.S. policies can discourage trophy hunting, Stanford expert says
Stanford legal scholar David J. Hayes says that the American government and policymakers can take measures to help reduce sport hunting of endangered wildlife populations around the world.


Stanford researchers unveil new virtual reality headset
Device creates a dramatically more natural virtual reality experience than what is present in today's leading headsets.


After 20 years, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy thrives on the web
The Stanford scholars who founded the groundbreaking online encyclopedia say that the project owes its success to the unique way it organizes its community of contributors, editors and users.


Stanford team's brain-controlled prosthesis nearly as good as one-finger typing
Years of work have yielded a technique that continuously corrects brain readings to give people with spinal cord injuries a more precise way to tap out commands by using a thought-controlled cursor.


Social Security's support for people with disabilities faces challenges, Stanford economist says
Stanford economist Mark Duggan suggests that the Social Security Disability Insurance program could benefit from new reforms. His research shows that inconsistencies exist in how the program determines if a person is sufficiently disabled to qualify for benefits.


Sports stadiums don't spur economic growth, Stanford expert says
Economist Roger Noll also notes that stadium costs that NFL teams expect local governments to contribute have fallen due to increased political resistance.


Stanford prepares to celebrate its 125th anniversary
The university community will be invited to celebrate Stanford's 125th anniversary beginning this fall. Nicole Sunahara, who heads the 125th anniversary office, invites campus departments and programs to collaborate on the upcoming celebrations.


Student teams win grants to commercialize Stanford energy inventions
Building on the success of its first year, the Innovation Transfer Program at the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy is financially supporting 11 new teams comprised mostly of Stanford students and recent graduates trying to put university research to work.


Stanford historian analyzes the history of America's preoccupation with China
Through an investigation of political, cultural and ideological history, Stanford historian Gordon H. Chang traces America's fascination with China, one characterized by both condemnation and admiration, in a new book.


Stanford students create apps to tackle learning challenges
Students in the Learning, Design, and Technology program at the Graduate School of Education analyze learning problems and then design solutions in yearlong master's projects.


NFL commissioner steps into virtual reality at Stanford
During a visit to Jeremy Bailenson's Virtual Human Interaction Lab at Stanford, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell learned how virtual experiences could improve training and officiating, and also teach players empathy on a variety of social issues.


A high-stakes birth lottery in the U.S., Stanford researchers say
A new study by Stanford researchers describes how American children born into high-income families can expect far greater  earnings and income over their lifetimes than children born into low-income families.


NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell steps into virtual reality at Stanford lab
During a visit to Jeremy Bailenson's Virtual Human Interaction Lab at Stanford, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell learned how virtual experiences could improve training and officiating, and also teach players empathy on a variety of social issues.


String quartet captivates visitors to the Anderson Collection at Stanford
As part of an effort to engage visitors in fresh and unique gallery experiences, the Anderson Collection at Stanford University treated museum visitors to a special performance by the St. Lawrence String Quartet.


California's vaccination law a national model for children's health, Stanford scholars say
Stanford legal experts say that California's controversial new vaccination law – one of the strictest in the nation – may serve as a model for other states at a time when vaccination rates are low by historical standards.


String quartet captivates visitors to the Anderson Collection
As part of an effort to engage visitors in fresh and unique gallery experiences, the Anderson Collection at Stanford University treated museum visitors to a special performance by the St. Lawrence String Quartet.


Megacities must address climate change, Stanford Nobel laureate says
Stanford chemist W.E. Moerner suggests that the world's largest cities should take steps to reduce the impacts of global warming.


Stanford economist proposes fourth branch of government to counter corruption
Stanford public policy expert Bruce M. Owen suggests a new fourth branch of government would lessen the influence of elites and special interests while better representing the middle class.


Shallow fracking raises questions for water in new Stanford research
Stanford scientist's investigations show that drinking water sources may be threatened by thousands of shallow oil and gas wells mined with the controversial process of hydraulic fracturing.


Stanford Board of Trustees elects Sakurako D. Fisher to a five-year term
Sakurako D. Fisher holds a bachelor's degree in international relations from Stanford. A devotee of the arts, she is president of the San Francisco Symphony and chair of the National Board of the Smithsonian Institution. She also is a trustee of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.


Stanford research: football helmet tests may not account for concussion-prone actions
Mounting evidence suggests that concussions in football are caused by the sudden rotation of the skull. David Camarillo's lab at Stanford has evidence that suggests current football helmet tests don't account for these movements.


Robo pingpong: Stanford students design, 'teach' robots to play
After learning new software and programming languages, Stanford students in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have an opportunity to choose a creative task and design a robot to perform the task for demonstration.


Stanford researchers find prawn solution to spread of deadly disease
New Stanford research shows that the river prawn, a natural predator of parasite-carrying snails, proves effective at curbing the spread of schistosomiasis in West Africa.


China's Communist Party schools open to Western-style education, Stanford scholar finds
Stanford political scientist Charlotte Lee says that Chinese Communist "party schools" have adapted entrepreneurial and market lessons in a way that reflects political change without formal democratization in China's authoritarian regime.


New campus tours showcase Stanford's excellence in humanities, arts
Led by Stanford students, the tours include stops at the new arts district and at key locations for the study of the human experience.


Groundbreaking Stanford economist Masahiko Aoki dies at 77
Stanford economist Masahiko Aoki was a pioneer and leader in the scholarly understanding of the organizational forms involved in economic life. He also was renowned for innovative research on the economies of Japan and other East Asian nations.


Research by Stanford law students offers roadmap for marijuana legalization
Stanford law students offer an analysis on how California could most effectively implement marijuana legalization for recreational use if voters approve ballot measures on the issue in 2016.


Stanford Repertory Theater presents the wide range of Noël Coward
Summer is the season for SRT's annual festival devoted to a single artist, but Coward may very well count as several.


Stanford Board of Trustees elects four new members
The new trustees will begin their five-year terms on Sept. 1.


Stanford students help formerly incarcerated people become entrepreneurs
Stanford Law School's Project ReMADE is a pro bono boot camp for formerly incarcerated people seeking to start their own businesses.


Stanford experts assess Iran nuclear deal
The key challenge for the international community will be making sure Iran keeps its part of the bargain, according to Stanford experts.


Volcanic rocks resembling Roman concrete help solve a mystery, Stanford scientists say
Fiber-reinforced rocks discovered at the site of Italy's dormant Campi Flegrei volcano are similar to a wonder-material used by the ancients to construct enduring structures such as the Pantheon, and may lead to improved construction materials today.


Stanford grant programs enable researchers to tackle major environmental challenges
Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment jump-starts interdisciplinary projects around the world.


Stanford d.school's Bernie Roth recommends a bias toward action
In his new book, Roth says he believes that people can lead more fulfilling lives by actually doing things, instead of merely trying to do things.


Stanford SEED awards $2.7 million for research projects around the globe
The awards from the Stanford Institute for Innovation in Developing Economies will fund 33 projects in 23 nations.


Professor Daniel Schwartz to lead Stanford Graduate School of Education
Schwartz, an expert in human cognition and educational technology, will assume the post Sept. 1.


Stanford scholar upends interpretation of philosopher Martin Heidegger
After a lifetime of studying the German philosopher's groundbreaking works, Stanford Religious Studies Professor Thomas Sheehan concludes that Heideggerians' obsession with Being misses the point.


Stanford researchers show the risk of shark attacks is way down
Hazard on California coast has dropped by more than 91 percent since 1950, according to study.


Fire burns dried vegetation in Lake Lagunita


Federal program for vaccine-injured children is failing, Stanford scholar says
A Stanford professor has found that the federal Vaccine Injury Compensation Program has not lived up its original goals of providing "simple justice" to children injured by vaccines. Lengthy delays and an adversarial tone characterize the program.


Stanford neuroscience research identifies more effective way to teach abstract math concepts
A new study shows that students who use symmetry to learn about numbers tap into critical brain circuits. The approach appears promising in improving math skills in general.


Poor economic planning at root of Greece's woes, Stanford economist says
Professor John B. Taylor says that Greece's best approach to its damaged economy is to radically change its economic policy in a pro-growth direction. He suggests making it easier to start up new businesses, while holding the line on tax increases and reducing governmental influence in the economy.


Americans embrace positive feelings, while Chinese prefer a balance, Stanford research shows
European Americans want to maximize the positive and minimize the negative more than Chinese.


Stanford water conservation measures expanded
University policies now in place limit irrigation using potable – meaning drinkable – water to two days per week. Irrigators using non-potable water have been asked to make 25 percent reductions and already are achieving measurable results.


Graduating seniors awarded 2015 Firestone and Golden medals, Kennedy Thesis Prize
Graduating seniors recently received the 2015 Firestone Medal for Excellence in Undergraduate Research, the Robert M. Golden Medal for Excellence in Humanities and Creative Arts, and the David M. Kennedy Honors Thesis Prize for their undergraduate capstone projects.


Stanford Invention Hall of Fame welcomes six new technologies and honors 27 new prolific inventors
Each new technology has earned more than $5 million in royalties for Stanford. The 27 new prolific inventors have invented at least seven technologies that, in aggregate, have generated over $500,000.


First spacecraft to visit Pluto carries software and equipment developed at Stanford
The university's planetary scientists and engineers have their eyes peeled on the edge of the solar system as New Horizons approaches the dwarf planet.


Stanford high-speed video reveals how lovebirds keep a clear line of sight
Lovebirds turn their heads at record speeds to maneuver through densely crowded airspace. Stanford's David Lentink says this strategy could be applied to drone cameras to improve visual systems.


Stanford researchers find mental health prescription: nature
Study finds that walking in nature yields measurable mental benefits and may reduce risk of depression.


Opening this fall: McMurtry Building, roundabouts and humanities dorm
For detailed information on construction projects in progress, including advice on how to navigate safely around campus on foot or on wheels, visit Stanford's HEADS UP website or subscribe to its weekly email newsletter.


Study of Stanford student-athletes provides new insights into injury impacts
By tracking athletes' health with electronic medical records, Stanford researchers deliver a more comprehensive picture of the lingering effects of certain injuries.


At Stanford, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon calls for global action
The United Nations must continue its efforts for peace, Ban Ki-moon told a Stanford audience Friday.


Suspect arrested in hate graffiti incident


Award-winning authors to discuss writing about war at Stanford Live event
Poet Natasha Trethewey and fiction writer Phil Klay will read selections from their works and join Stanford political scientist Scott Sagan in conversation on June 30 at Bing Concert Hall.


Stanford art and art history faculty, staff making plans for the McMurtry Building
Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the new interdisciplinary arts hub is expected to house a hive of activity.


Stanford economist finds lessons for U.S. from Japan's lost decade
Takeo Hoshi 's research highlights how Japan's economic troubles in the 1990s and beyond can offer insights for U.S. and European leaders in the aftermath of the 2007-09 crisis.


Stanford plans new bus parking site for Lasuen Street at Campus Drive
Tourist buses, which have been accommodated on Roth Way since 2011, will be moved farther away from the Oval and Main Quad to a new area on Lasuen Street at Campus Drive. Parking & Transportation Services welcomes suggestions about managing buses and tourists.


Stanford study finds blacks and Hispanics typically need higher incomes than whites to live in affluent neighborhoods
New research reveals troubling patterns of racial segregation that could lead to less upward mobility for black and Hispanic families.


Stanford researchers stretch a thin crystal to get better solar cells
Crystalline semiconductors like silicon can catch photons and convert their energy into electron flows. New research shows a little stretching could give one of silicon's lesser-known cousins its own place in the sun.


Community Standards office director reflects on her first year at Stanford
The Honor Code articulates Stanford's expectations of students and faculty in establishing and maintaining the highest standards in academic work.


Henry Riggs, retired engineering professor and entrepreneur, dies at 80
A memorial service will take place today for Henry E. "Hank" Riggs, professor emeritus of engineering and a former vice president of development.


Stanford researchers seek least destructive balance of agriculture vs. forests
Scientists show that deforestation can have vastly different impacts. For example, clearing intact forest can damage biodiversity and carbon storage up to four times more than clearing forest edges.


Single-catalyst water splitter from Stanford produces clean-burning hydrogen 24/7
Stanford scientists have developed a cheap and efficient way to extract clean-burning hydrogen fuel from water 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 


Brain connections last as long as the memories they store, Stanford neuroscientist finds
A team of Bio-X scientists applied microscopy know-how to a long-standing theory in neuroscience: if brain connections called synapses store memories, those synapses should last as long as the memories themselves. It turns out they do, as Mark Schnitzer was able to show.


Oklahoma earthquakes linked to oil and gas wastewater disposal wells, say Stanford researchers
A new Stanford study finds that the recent spike in triggered earthquakes in Oklahoma is primarily due to the injection of wastewater produced during oil production – but not from fracking.


Building a brain: Stanford neuroscientists and engineers work together
Computers will one day match our own mental agility; learning, navigating and performing complex interactions all on scant power. But getting to that point will require neuroscientists and engineers to reverse engineer our least understood organ – the brain.


Stanford researcher says sixth mass extinction is here
Paul Ehrlich and others use conservative estimates to prove that species are disappearing faster than at any time since the dinosaurs' demise.


Stanford scholars give voice to the Chinese workers who helped build Transcontinental Railroad
A century and a half after Chinese migrants toiled on the Transcontinental Railroad, an interdisciplinary team of Stanford professors is shedding light on a key chapter of the intertwined relationship between China and the United States.


Oklahoma earthquakes linked to oil and gas drilling, say Stanford researchers
A new Stanford study finds that the recent spike in triggered earthquakes in Oklahoma is primarily due to the injection of wastewater produced during oil production – but not from fracking.


St. Louis Cardinals' alleged hacking raises ethical concerns, Stanford expert says
Joe "Chip" Pitts discusses the rewards and risks of data analytics in professional sports.


2015 Stanford Commencement weekend in pictures


Stanford trustees approve budget plan, discuss wide range of topics
Trustees approved the university's 2015-16 budget plan, including a $5 million increase in undergraduate financial aid. The board heard design updates on several capital projects, including the Anne T. and Robert E. Bass Biology Research Building.


Stanford researcher identifies strategy to guide consumers to green energy choices
Sebastian Lotz, a research fellow at Stanford, has shown that behavioral decision design can nudge people to purchase clean, renewable energy plans over fossil fuel.


Vernon Jordan urges graduates to be 'disturbers of the unjust peace'
At Baccalaureate,  the civil rights leader told graduates to realize their talents – not just for their own gain – but also to lift up those in whose shoes, but for the grace of God, they might have been walking.


Journalist Richard Engel tells Stanford grads to experience the world
Richard Engel told the graduates that taking chances can make a difference in the future of humanity.


Be 'disturbers of the unjust peace,' civil rights leader Vernon Jordan tells Stanford graduates
Baccalaureate speaker Vernon E. Jordan, Jr. told graduates that the world was calling out for them to realize their talents – not just for their own gain – but also to lift up those in whose shoes, but for the grace of God, they might have been walking.


Stanford Board of Trustees acts on investment responsibility matters


Stanford's Faculty Senate ends the year with sendoffs and a renewed commitment to civility
The Faculty Senate on Thursday heard a presentation from outgoing and incoming leaders of the Associated Students and a report from the Emeriti Council. They bid farewell in song to the outgoing chair Russell Berman and gave President John Hennessy a standing ovation. They also urged the community to foster a climate of respect and civility when debating controversial issues.


New research initiative at Stanford to comprehensively study development and use of natural gas
Stanford University's Natural Gas Initiative will research many questions related to the responsible development of natural gas as a fuel supply in the United States and around the world.


Stanford President John L. Hennessy to step down in 2016
President John L. Hennessy announced today that he plans to step down after more than 15 years leading one of the world's foremost research institutions.


Fulbright Program awards grants to Stanford doctoral candidates, alumni and graduating seniors


Scholar at Stanford debunks long-held beliefs about economic growth in ancient Greece
Using a pioneering digitization project that maps out details of life in the ancient world, classics Professor Josiah Ober links the democratic politics and surprisingly robust economy of classical Greek society.


Stanford's Cantor Arts Center acquires Edward Hopper painting
"New York Corner," 1913, finds a new home at Stanford University.


Key privacy doctrine needs updating due to technology, Stanford law professor says
Stanford scholar Robert Weisberg says it is time to match old law – the "third-party doctrine" – to today's technology. Warrants should be required for law enforcement access to phone and bank data.


Women more concerned with looming parenthood than men, Stanford scholar says
Stanford researcher Brooke Conroy Bass found that women were more likely than men to think and worry about how their career paths might align with future parenthood. Women also tended to downscale future career goals in anticipation of children.


Stanford's 2015 Cuthbertson, Dinkelspiel and Gores awards honor librarian, faculty and PhD students
University Librarian Michael Keller, three members of the faculty and two doctoral candidates will receive awards on June 14 at the 124th Commencement Ceremony for their outstanding contributions to Stanford.


Stanford engineers team up with U.S. Army to set computational record
Now billions of questions can be answered in about three minutes.


Stanford engineers develop computer that operates on water droplets
Manu Prakash and his students have developed a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets.


Stanford researchers find strong constraint on delivery of optical signals to computers
Stanford engineers highlight the limitation of a popular technique for one-way optical data transmission on computer chips.


Stanford engineers develop state-by-state plan to convert U.S. to clean, renewable energy
Mark Z. Jacobson and colleagues show that it's technically possible for each state to replace fossil fuel energy with entirely clean, renewable energy.


Stanford chemist explains excitement of chemistry to students, the public
Carolyn Bertozzi sees chemicals as having personalities and those personalities determine how they behave. She's bringing this vision to her teaching, hoping to help chemistry and biology students as well as the general public understand what's exciting in chemistry.


Stanford's Cardinal at Work Welcome Center offers a 'one-stop shop' for new hires
Stanford's redesigned orientation is a daylong program created to welcome new employees to the university on their first day at work.  Departments across the university, including human resources, information technology services and parking and transportation, work together to ensure that new hires feel prepared and inspired as they begin their careers here.


Crop adjustments may lessen climate change's economic effects, Stanford economist says
Stanford economist Dave Donaldson found that the impact of climate change might amount for just a .26 percent reduction in global gross domestic product if farmers are able to switch what types of crops they grow.


Stanford scientists show fMRI memory detectors can be easily fooled
Anthony Wagner and colleagues have shown that, with a little bit of concentration, people can easily hide their memories from brain scans.


Stanford student group reshapes music-making hierarchy
Twenty-four musicians experiment with collaborative leadership in their new conductorless ensemble, SCOr.


Stanford anthropologist Arthur P. Wolf dies at 83
Wolf was known for his knowledge of early 20th-century Taiwan and as a scholar of the biological roots of incest avoidance.


Stanford researchers develop technique to harness everyday seismic waves to image Earth
Stanford geophysicists have devised a technique that transforms the tiny tremors generated by the everyday hustle and bustle of city life into a tool for probing the subsurface of the Earth.


Stanford's 2015-16 budget plan reflects strong fiscal position
Stanford is in excellent financial condition, even though federal funding for academic research remains limited, and the university continues to benefit from strong investment returns, Vice Provost Tim Warner said in a report to the Faculty Senate.


Feinstein at Stanford: U.S. needs to track possible terrorists
U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein says that the government's mass collection of communications data is misunderstood and that the data are used selectively and only for monitoring possible terrorist suspects.


New 'designer carbon' from Stanford boosts battery performance
The new material significantly improves the performance of batteries and supercapacitors.


Grippy not sticky: Stanford engineers debut adhesive material that doesn't get stuck
A?material?inspired?by?the?unique?physics?of?geckos'?fingertips?could?allow?robotic?hands?to?grip?nearly?any?type?of?object?without?applying?excessive?pressure.


Search committee appointed for new Stanford VP for Human Resources


No safety threat at Stanford from July 2014 laboratory shipment


Stanford breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers
Light can transmit more data while consuming far less power than electricity, and an engineering feat brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires.


Stanford brain wave study shows how different teaching methods affect reading development
Stanford Professor Bruce McCandliss found that beginning readers who focus on letter-sound relationships, or phonics, increase activity in the area of their brains best wired for reading.


Fly-catching robot developed by Stanford scientists speeds biomedical research
A team of Stanford Bio-X scientists has created a robot that expands the scope of biomedical research that can be carried out with a common laboratory organism – fruit flies. The tool both speeds existing research and opens new fields of study.


Latin American authors reshaping world literature, Stanford literary scholar says
Stanford scholar Héctor Hoyos' research goes beyond famed writers to uncover a whole generation of Latin American authors who are contributing novel perspectives on the evolving landscape of global culture.


Stanford invites Menlo Park residents to discuss Middle Plaza project
Stanford is inviting Menlo Park residents to two open houses to discuss a public plaza that will be the centerpiece of redevelopment efforts at 500 El Camino Real.


Compassion is an effective managerial strategy, Stanford expert says
Psychologist Emma Seppala says promoting a culture of trust encourages collaboration.


Multicultural Springfest celebrates diversity, longevity among Stanford's staff
The annual event celebrates the diversity of employees from across the university and recognizes staff who have reached milestone anniversaries in their careers on campus.


Stanford earthquake researcher at Nepal quake
PhD student Anne Sanquini studies how to motivate people to take action to protect homes and schools against earthquakes. She was in Nepal when the temblor hit.


Stanford professor developing water usage model that could help California
Stanford economist Frank Wolak is creating a customer-level water demand model that can be used to design tiered water rate schedules for California.


Stanford statement on SAE fraternity


Stanford scholars offer own visions of Japan's upcoming statement on World War II
Stanford experts believe the Japanese prime minister must send the right message regarding his country's World War II aggressions on the 70th anniversary of the global conflict.


Stanford scholars issue plan to reduce poverty
A new Stanford report describes how poverty can be permanently reduced in the Golden State. Billed as the Equal Opportunity Plan, this approach focuses on creating equal opportunities for children at the most critical points in their lives.


Stanford Perimeter Trail construction scheduled
Work begins later this month on the El Camino Real section of the new Stanford Perimeter Trail – a 3.4-mile link between recreational areas in the foothills and the bay.


TEDxStanford presenters describe turning points and opportunities
The fourth annual TEDxStanford conference was a rich experience for everyone.


Stanford scientists discover how microbes acquire electricity in making methane
New findings by Stanford engineering Professor Alfred Spormann and colleagues could pave the way for microbial "factories" that produce renewable biofuels and chemicals.


Key strategies can boost donations at crowdfunding sites, Stanford experts say
A sophisticated analysis by Stanford data scientists supports a common sense approach: help fundraisers craft successful appeals and thank givers promptly, and they will return to give more.


Stanford Repertory Theater explores the ethics of science with Brecht's Life of Galileo
Do scientists have an ethical responsibility to serve the greater good? In two free performances on May 15 and 16, Stanford students, professors and professional actors will present Bertolt Brecht's masterful exploration of the roles of commerce, politics and religion in shaping the future of scientific research.


Senate addresses Late Career Practitioner Policy
At Thursday's Faculty Senate meeting, members approved a resolution regarding late career practitioners at Stanford Health Care. They also heard a presentation on initiatives to improve diversity in graduate education. The 2015-16 chair of the senate will be Kathryn "Kam" Moler, professor of physics and of applied physics.


When political parties fail to show ideological differences, centrist voters are less likely to vote, Stanford expert says
New Stanford research on European elections shows that when political parties fail to show ideological differences, centrist abstention from voting is higher. As parties polarize, people are also more likely to go to the ideological extremes.


Stanford music scholar redefines the jazz and cabaret culture of 1920s Harlem
Musicologist Nate Sloan's investigation of Harlem Renaissance jazz portrays a diverse, multisensory experience where music, place and race influenced each other in profound and lasting ways.


HR chief Jones to step down
David A. Jones, vice president for human resources, is leaving Stanford to join Kaiser Permanente.


Stanford's Another Look book club reconsiders Camus' 'The Stranger'
Albert Camus' 1942 classic, "The Stranger," raises tough questions about culture clash and how we find meaning in our lives – and the narratives we create to absolve ourselves. The final event in the three-year Another Look series will take place on June 1.


Stanford Law School practicums offer real-world lessons
Students in the Law and Policy Lab gain tools they'll need for shaping policy at local, state, federal and international levels.  


Stanford researchers create a promising solution for urban toilets
Portable dry toilet and waste service system prove effective in Haiti's urban slums and can help solve the problem of "flying toilets."


Stanford literary scholar: White whales and the 'Melville Effect'
With a resurgence of Melville-themed art across the multimedia landscape, Stanford Humanities Center Fellow Joseph Boone says the legendary writer has become a 21st-century muse for artists – including Boone himself.


Priscilla Fiden, 'a remarkable citizen of Stanford,' wins Amy J. Blue Award
Fiden, the assistant dean for administrative operations at the Graduate School of Education, inspires staff to make their "A game" even better.


Norman Nie, Stanford scholar and entrepreneur, dies at 72
A leading thinker in the behavior of the American voter, Norman Nie revolutionized how social scientists analyze data.


Mao left China ready for reform, Stanford scholar says
Mao Zedong's long campaign against "capitalist tendencies" in the Chinese Communist Party unwittingly laid the groundwork for a transition to a market economy.


Stanford researchers use diverse discussion groups to boost online learning experience
New Talkabout video discussions designed by Stanford researchers can connect diverse groups of learners across the globe and improve class performance.


Stanford biologists discover that large whales have nerves that stretch like bungee cords
Fin whales suck in a swimming pool's worth of water every time they gulp down food. A team of scientists, including Stanford's Jeremy Goldbogen, discovered that unique nerves in the animal's mouth extend by up to 115 percent to accommodate these big bites.


Embracing stress is more important than reducing stress, Stanford psychologist says
Kelly McGonigal says new research indicates that stress can make us stronger, smarter and happier.


Jane Shaw officially welcomed into the Stanford community
During a service that featured the official investiture by President John Hennessy and a sermon by actor and playwright Anna Deavere Smith, the Rev. Professor Jane Shaw was formally installed as dean for religious life. 


Leslie Winick, 'charmingly indefatigable,' wins Amy J. Blue Award
As the director of alumni and student class outreach for the Stanford Alumni Association, Winick is the "wind and the sails" of Reunion Homecoming, colleagues say, and every year brings fresh drive, commitment and enthusiasm to the annual event.


Mao left China backward but, ironically, ready for reform, Stanford scholar says
Mao Zedong's long campaign against "capitalist tendencies" in the Chinese Communist Party unwittingly laid the groundwork for a transition to a market economy.


Stanford researchers use diverse, global discussion groups to boost online learning experience
New Talkabout video discussions designed by Stanford researchers can connect diverse groups of learners across the globe and improve class performance.


Stanford Emerging String Quartet Program musicians find an audience behind bars
The St. Lawrence String Quartet, the university's ensemble-in-residence, cultivates a culture of community outreach.


Digitization and inventory project at Stanford's Cantor Arts Center nears the finish line
Thousands of art objects say cheese for the camera during five-year effort.


Stanford researcher imagines a world without large, plant-eating animals
Stanford biologist Rodolfo Dirzo and a team of ecologists forecast enormous ecological, social and economic costs from the loss of large herbivores, but offer some solutions.


Stanford Dining's Kahlil Wells, 'a joy to work with,' wins Amy J. Blue Award
As an assistant director of Stanford Dining, Kahlil Wells oversees an operation that serves breakfast, lunch, dinner and late night offerings to students living in Lagunita Court, Roble Hall and other residences on the west side of campus. He is described as a dedicated manager and supportive mentor who sets high standards of excellence.


Stanford researchers observe the moment when a mind is changed
A new algorithm enables a moment-by-moment analysis of brain activity each time a laboratory monkey reaches this way or that during an experiment. It's like reading the monkey's mind.


Stanford identifies its preferred approach for the future of Searsville Dam and Reservoir
After extensive study of Searsville Dam and Reservoir, a Stanford committee recommends that the university develop and evaluate, in collaboration with resource agencies, two alternative ways to achieve fish passage, while avoiding an increase in downstream or upstream flooding and also preserving and providing riparian and wetlands habitats.


Stanford panel considers role of technology in teaching and learning
The role of technology in teaching and learning was the focus of President John Hennessy's annual address to the Academic Council on Thursday. Also announced was the upcoming 2015-16 Year of Learning, which will spur discussion about teaching, learning and research in the 21st century.


Academic Council considers role of technology in teaching and learning
The role of technology in teaching and learning was the focus of President John Hennessy's annual address to the Academic Council on Thursday. Also announced was the upcoming 2015-16 Year of Learning, which will spur discussion about teaching, learning and research in the 21st century.


Stanford community contributes to Nepal's earthquake relief efforts
Members of the Stanford community – from students to doctors and mapping experts – are organizing a range of efforts to help with rescue and recovery in Nepal.


Shinzo Abe at Stanford: Innovation will spur Japan's future
Japanese prime minister touts innovation links to Stanford, Silicon Valley


Nine Stanford faculty elected to National Academy of Sciences
The faculty members have been elected to receive one of the highest honors for an American scientist in recognition of their achievements in original research.


Perseverance key to children's intellectual growth, Stanford scholar says
Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck says that children are more motivated when they are told their intelligence or talents can grow and expand. "Grit" is also important for children and adults alike because, when facing challenges, setbacks are inevitable.


The best rules are simple, flexible and purposeful, Stanford professor says
Stanford engineering Professor Kathleen Eisenhardt describes how lessons gleaned from the boardroom and beyond can affect every corner of our lives.


Stanford Computer Science Department celebrates its 50th anniversary
Daylong event, "In Service to the World," reflects on the past accomplishments and future prospects of this world-class academic department.


Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to speak at Stanford
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan will visit Stanford this Thursday to speak on the subject of innovation. The event is open on a first-come, first-served basis to members of the Stanford community with a Stanford ID.


Stanford and UC Berkeley partner on NASA's new effort to detect life on other planets
A new interdisciplinary research program from NASA brings together an interdisciplinary team of scientists, including Stanford's Bruce Macintosh, to devise new technologies and techniques for detecting life on exoplanets.


Stanford expert offers advice for international travelers
Jeffery Hawthorne, international manager in the Office of Risk Management, advises travelers to research the countries they are planning to visit to make sure they have the appropriate documents and immunizations. The Office of International Affairs maintains a travel registry that allows the university to quickly determine if there are Stanford faculty, staff or students in a country during a significant natural disaster or political incident.


New federal rules on hydraulic fracturing a good start, say Stanford experts
Hydraulic fracturing has unleashed massive new supplies of natural gas, as well as anxiety about contaminated drinking water and earthquakes.


Online 'mindset' interventions help students do better in school, Stanford research shows
Stanford researchers found that brief Internet-based interventions that instill a "growth mindset" and a sense of purpose can improve learning, especially for struggling students. These interventions could potentially reach vast numbers of students at low cost.


Prospective Stanford students enjoy Admit Weekend on the Farm
The Stanford campus was awash in Cardinal spirit last week when prospective freshmen and their families came to campus for Admit Weekend 2015.


President Hennessy condemns act of hate at student residences
Stanford President John Hennessy has condemned the early Sunday morning vandalism of swastikas spray-painted around student residences as an act of hate "that has no place at Stanford."


Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter unveils cyber strategy at Stanford talk
The Pentagon chief said he had come from Washington to enlist Silicon Valley's help in the fight against cyber crime and terrorism.


Stanford Live expands its mission with 2015-16 season
Next year's Stanford Live season will feature three events with Anna Deavere Smith and a new work by Stanford composer Jonathan Berger for the Kronos Quartet. Other highlights include appearances by Chick Corea and Béla Fleck, Bernadette Peters, Arlo Guthrie and scratch DJ Kid Koala.


SLAC X-ray study may lead to better blood pressure drugs
New atomic-scale details could help create more effective medications with fewer side effects.


Stanford historian uncovers the dark roots of humanitarianism
Through a study of the history of the French colonial Congo-Océan Railway, Stanford historian JP Daughton has discovered how modern humanitarianism arose from the brutality of European colonialism.


Stanford senior wins Truman Scholarship for graduate studies
Alfred Delena, who was born and raised on the Pueblo of Zuni reservation in New Mexico, is one of 58 recipients of this year's award, which provides up to $30,000 for graduate study to students with "exceptional leadership potential" who are committed to careers in public service.


Stanford's Cardinal Nights program offers alcohol-free entertainment
The university's Cardinal Nights programs offer alcohol-free events for students, including concerts, novelty acts and craft nights on campus, plus trips off campus – including free transportation – to see movies, touring Broadway shows and Major League Baseball games.


A spiritual practice is the foundation of a meaningful life, Oprah Winfrey says
At the end of her daylong visit to Stanford, Oprah Winfrey delivered "Harry's Last Lecture on a Meaningful Life."


Compassion meditation reduces 'mind-wandering,' Stanford research shows
Stanford's Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education found that compassion meditation training can reduce "mind-wandering" and encourage caring and benevolent behavior toward oneself and others.


Stanford's Admit Weekend for Class of 2019 opens Thursday
Admit Weekend is designed to encourage prospective freshmen to begin to explore Stanford's academic, residential, athletic and social scenes, by offering them a wide variety of activities and programs that showcase the university's breadth and depth.


American Academy of Arts and Sciences elects 10 Stanford professors to 2015 class
Ten Stanford faculty members were tapped for membership in the 2015 class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the country's oldest and most prestigious honorary learned societies.


Immigration appeals process lacks consistency, fairness, Stanford research shows
A Stanford scholar found that the appeals process for the immigration courts fails to correct disparities in judges' decisions. He suggests new reforms to make the process more fair and consistent.


Five students with Stanford affiliations awarded 2015 Soros Fellowships for New Americans
Soros Fellowships provide financial support for study in any degree-granting graduate program in any field at any U.S. university. Fellows are immigrants and the children of immigrants who are chosen for their creativity, initiative and sustained accomplishment.


William Cohen, Stanford law professor and constitutional law expert, dead at 81
Stanford law Professor William Cohen's constitutional law casebook has given generations of law students a clear path toward a better understanding of the court's doctrinal issues.


Stanford scholar reveals how fears of damnation undergird American history
Drawing on 18th-and 19th-century writings, religious studies scholar Kathryn Gin Lum shows how the concept of "hell" influenced religion, politics and social reform.


Stanford professor designs mathematics and mindset boost for teachers and students
The "Week of Inspirational Math" curriculum will be available for free online. It includes videos and math tasks, and is aligned to the Common Core.


Senate hears about digital initiatives of Stanford Libraries
At Thursday's Faculty Senate meeting, University Librarian Michael Keller gave an update on new programs and projects. In addition, Provost John Etchemendy made a statement encouraging respectful campus discourse, particularly among students.


Stanford scholar unpacks the rhetoric behind extremist Marine Le Pen's mainstream success
A pioneering textual analysis of French political speeches led by Stanford Professor of French Cécile Alduy reveals how Marine Le Pen, leader of France's surging far-right National Front, has made extremism palatable in a land of republican values.


Stanford seeks student participation in campus climate survey


Stanford Dance Division brings documentary about dancing with Parkinson's to campus
Stanford faculty and students explore approaching Parkinson's disease with intentional movement. Screening of documentary Capturing Grace by a Stanford alumnus is the centerpiece of two days of events during Parkinson's Awareness Month.


Anton Zeilinger to deliver Stanford's annual Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lectures April 20-21
Award-winning physicist explores how "entanglement" between microscopic particles enables atomic-scale communication across large distances.


New Stanford energy system a model for efficiency
The comprehensive system incorporates solar power for electricity, combined with heat recovery, to cut greenhouse gas emissions 68 percent and fossil fuel 65 percent.


Stanford Faculty Senate to hear report on libraries


Teachers more likely to label black students as troublemakers, Stanford research shows
Stanford psychologists Jennifer Eberhardt and Jason Okonofua experimentally examined the psychological processes involved when teachers discipline black students more harshly than white students.


Political disruptions generated economic collapses in post-communist states, Stanford scholar says
New Stanford research on socialist countries' transitions to market systems in the 1990s found that the longer the decline of that country's communist system before regime change and the greater the uncertainty over state ownership of assets, the more likely the country fell into a long decline.


Sense of youthful purpose driven by action, passion, says Stanford researcher
Stanford education Professor William Damon says that research shows that while young people can sometimes struggle with a sense of purpose, they are likely to find it in concrete and action-oriented goals.


Stanford art history scholar explores nature and culture in frost and forests
George Philip LeBourdais, a doctoral student in Stanford's Department of Art & Art History, applies his research on Arctic artistry and ecology to curate an exhibition on how trees inform human judgment and imagination. The exhibition opens April 15 at the Cantor Arts Center.


Statement of the Stanford Board of Trustees on divestment


TEDxStanford returns for 2015 with dynamic speakers and a new twist
TEDxStanford will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday, May 17. 


First student cohort chosen for Stanford in New York
Students selected for the new program, which Stanford will launch in the fall of the 2015-16 academic year, will live, work as interns and study in New York City for one academic quarter.


Stanford undergrads explore the power of storytelling with audio documentaries
From orphans in Ghana to drag queens in San Francisco – Stanford students in a storytelling program have learned about communities, events and traditions both foreign and familiar. In April the latest audio documentaries will be aired on campus radio station KZSU and released online on the Stanford Storytelling website.


Three Stanford staffers win 2015 Amy J. Blue Awards
The awards honor the life and work of the late Amy J. Blue, an associate vice president for administrative services and facilities, who was known as a woman of incisive intelligence, abundant energy and unrelenting honesty.


Video suggests police shooting in South Carolina not justified, Stanford legal expert says
Stanford law Professor David Sklansky suggests body cameras for officers, greater law enforcement diversity, and fair and objective investigations when the police use lethal force.


Stanford engineers devise method for producing high-res, 3D images of nanoscale objects
The technique, called cathodoluminescence tomography, could assist in the development of high-efficiency solar cells and LEDS, or improve the way biological systems are visualized.


Arthur Bienenstock honored with first endowed professorship to link SLAC and Stanford
The holder of the Wallenberg-Bienenstock Professorship will have a joint appointment on the faculties of SLAC and a Stanford science or engineering department. The professorship honors Bienenstock for his efforts to strengthen ties between Stanford and Swedish universities.  


Stanford law professor creates new way to help students deal with the stress of it all
Law school and anxiety seem to go together for many students, but Stanford law Professor Joe Bankman wants to help students dial down the pressure using techniques he has learned while studying for another degree – in clinical psychology.


Q&A: Co-chairs of the Provost's Task Force on Sexual Assault Policies and Practices talk about recommendations
The Provost's Task Force on Sexual Assault Policies and Practices has issued its recommendations for enhancing Stanford's approach to preventing and responding to sexual assault, relationship violence and other forms of prohibited conduct at Stanford.  


Letter from the provost to the campus community


Aluminum battery from Stanford offers safe alternative to conventional batteries
The new aluminum-ion battery could replace many of the lithium-ion and alkaline batteries in wide use today.


Social psychology insights could reduce tax evasion, Stanford scholars say
Stanford tax expert Joseph Bankman suggests that a redesign of tax forms and the online filing experience based on social psychology insights would encourage more people to file truthful returns.


Emotional fit important between patient and doctor, Stanford research shows
Stanford psychologists offer new evidence on why people prefer certain physicians over others, and how emotion plays a role in shaping patient health behavior.


Stanford scholar with an international voice
Russell Berman, a professor of German studies and of comparative literature, is the chair of the Faculty Senate. He is an international voice for foreign language study and for reforming PhD programs in the humanities. He also is an expert on cultural and political relations between Europe and the United States.


Indiana religious freedom law too broad, Stanford scholar says
Stanford law Professor Bernadette Meyler says Indiana's religious freedom law is an overreach of similar federal legislation and a U.S. Supreme Court ruling from last year. If legislative intent to discriminate is discovered, she said, then 14th Amendment protections may be in order for LGBT people.


U.S. must convince Iran not to build a nuclear bomb, says Stanford expert
Stanford scholar Siegfried Hecker believes that Iran has already developed the option to build a nuclear bomb. Washington must convince Tehran not to exercise that option. Recent negotiations have a good chance to do so, he says.


Stanford's Ants in Space study launches citizen science for students worldwide
Want to teach high school students about science, technology, engineering and math? "Get ants," advises Stanford biologist Deborah M. Gordon.


The global oil price drop may last for the next couple decades, Stanford economist says
Stanford economist Frank Wolak says the drop in oil prices and demand reflects heightened energy production in North America, better technologies and the declining market power of the OPEC countries.


Stanford's Cantor Arts Center presents solo exhibition of Jacob Lawrence's work, Promised Land
Stanford students are the first scholars to study and present some of the works that have never been on public display.


Stanford historian looks to the U.S. Postal Service to map the boom and bust of 19th-century American West
The history of the settlement of the American West comes to life with Geography of the Post, a digital mapping platform that creates visualizations of where and when post offices operated.


Stanford research: Disrespect toward people based on group may cause anti-social behavior
Stanford researchers found that when people feel disrespected because of their gender or race, they are more likely to engage in anti-social behaviors like stealing and cheating.


Security Conundrum lecture series to end with view from Congress and the courts
Mark Udall, the former U.S. senator who has fought government spying on U.S. citizens, will speak on campus April 2, as part of Stanford's Security Conundrum lecture series.


Moral stigma spreads down from the top in organizations, Stanford research shows
Stanford research shows that in social hierarchies, moral stigma spreads down more than up.


Stanford offers admission to 2,144 students, expands financial aid program
Stanford has extended undergraduate admission offers to the Class of 2019 and announced an increase in financial aid. Now, parents with annual family incomes below $125,000 and typical assets will be expected to pay no Stanford tuition.


New Stanford manufacturing process could yield better solar cells, faster chips
Silicon isn't the only chip-making material under the sun, just the cheapest. But a new process could make the alternative material, gallium arsenide, more cost effective.


Stanford collaborates on research to help online groups organize themselves
Making decisions and taking actions require leadership tools to minimize infighting and focus the energy on action.


Robert Wallace named to lead Stanford Management Company
Wallace, CEO and chief investment officer of Alta Advisers, will succeed John Powers, who announced his departure last fall.


Stanford engineer helps crack mystery of bird flight
A team lead by mechanical engineer David Lentink has identified the design qualities that make bird wings famously efficient over a wide range of flight styles. The research could lead to improved aircraft design.


Israeli election results reflect deep divisions in that society, say Stanford scholars
Stanford faculty experts say that security concerns were the dominant factor in the outcome of Israel's election this week. Political and religious fault lines in Israeli society contributed to the tone and results of the campaign.


Manzanita residence hall aims at humanities
The new Humanities House in Manzanita Park is designed to serve as a residential, cultural and intellectual hub for humanities programs and activities at Stanford. It opens to 125 undergraduates this fall.


Trust erodes over time in the online world, Stanford experts say
New Stanford research shows that technology facilitated interpersonal trust among users of an online travel site, but establishing deeper ties became harder as users acquired more and more reviews.


Stanford students build basketball-shooting robots
This year's competition, held in front of a large, cheering crowd, featured bots that shoot and dunk as many "basketballs" as possible in under two minutes.


Stanford biologists show how the evolution of physical traits can influence behavior
African cichlid fish attract mates by building different types of small sand structures, called bowers. Stanford biology Professor Russell Fernald and others have shown how the rapid evolution of other physical traits has played a role in determining bower shape.


Stanford asks Santa Clara County for GUP amendment
Stanford is asking the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors to amend the General Use Permit and Community Plan approved in 2000 to give the university more flexibility in planning future housing construction.


Stanford neuroscientists find noisy neurons are key to learning
A computer model of brain function helps explain a 20-year-old finding that the way a single noisy neuron fires in the brain can predict an animal's decisions. It turns out neurons without noise can't learn.


Stanford's computational journalism offers distinct tools for better storytelling
Stanford's data-driven journalism program gives students powerful new ways to explore complex stories of public and social significance.


Stanford research shows how people turn against groups in cases of injustice
New Stanford research shows that people may be willing to turn against their group's emotions when they believe the group should, but does not, feel the same emotions they feel.


Stanford's Board of Trustees elects two new members
Bret E. Comolli, who serves on the board of directors of Stanford Health Care, and Angela S. Filo, who serves on the advisory board of Stanford Graduate School of Education, will begin five-year terms as trustees on April 1.


Stanford researchers unravel secrets of shape-shifting bacteria
Working on observations of bacteria going undercover in ways that might trick the human immune system, Stanford bioengineers have created a time-lapse video that shows this process step by step.


Paul Kalanithi, Stanford neurosurgeon and writer, dies at 37
Paul Kalanithi wrote essays for the New York Times and Stanford Medicine reflecting on being a physician and a patient, the human experience of facing death, and the joy he found despite terminal illness.


Stanford researchers solve the mystery of the dancing droplets
Years of research satisfy a graduate student's curiosity about the molecular minuet he observed among drops of ordinary food coloring.


Oprah Winfrey to deliver Stanford lecture on a meaningful life
Oprah Winfrey will serve as the Rathbun Visiting Fellow and speak Monday, April 20, at 7 p.m. in Memorial Church. Free student, faculty and staff tickets will be available by lottery.


Scientists shrink ants to study mechanisms that control DNA expression
By shrinking ants, biologists present a model for understanding how environmental factors can influence DNA expression.


Stanford study shows benefits, downsides of migration within developing countries
Stanford economist Melanie Morten found a positive net effect of internal migration for labor reasons in developing countries like India. However, it alters longstanding "social safety net" practices of lending and borrowing for households.


Marijuana edible products need stronger regulation, Stanford experts say
Stanford Law Professors Rob MacCoun and Michelle Mello say that marijuana edibles, which look like cookies and are often highly potent, should be better regulated in an effort to protect children.


Students and professionals join in the recording studio at Stanford's Bing Concert Hall
The St. Lawrence String Quartet and the Stanford Chamber Chorale prepare for the release of their performance of Joseph Haydn's Lord Nelson Mass.


Stanford's 2015 Community Partnership Awards honor three local programs
Winners are selected based on their initiative, leadership and involvement in projects that embody the spirit of genuine partnership and benefit the overall community.


Great Recession spurred student interest in higher education, Stanford expert says
Economist Caroline Hoxby said one benefit of the last recession was that students were more likely to enroll in college, despite rising costs. College-going has increased in every recession since the 1960s, she said.


Bunyan Lecture at Stanford: We are children of the vacuum, says astrophysicist
French astrophysicist François R. Bouchet will tell the story of the beginning of the universe – with a plot twist recently revealed by the Planck satellite mission – when he delivers Stanford's Bunyan Lecture March 11.


Senate discusses outdoor smoking policy, faculty diversity
Members referred proposals to change Stanford's outdoor smoking policy to a committee for further consideration. They also heard a presentation on the university's progress toward hiring more women and minorities.


U.S. and Iran seek nuclear deal despite huge hurdles, a Stanford scholar says
Stanford Iran expert Abbas Milani says Iranian leadership is split over making a nuclear deal, while the United States may face stiff opposition from Congress before an end-of-March deadline for an outline of an agreement.


Senate to hear faculty diversity report, 'smoke-free campus' proposals
Karen Cook, vice provost for faculty development and diversity, and Keith Humphreys, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford School of Medicine, will give presentations at today's senate meeting.


Stanford Professor Elizabeth Hadly to receive Roland Volunteer Service Prize
The Miriam Aaron Roland Volunteer Service Prize recognizes Stanford faculty who engage and involve students in integrating academic scholarship with significant and meaningful volunteer service to society.


Students and professionals join forces in the recording studio at Stanford's Bing Concert Hall
Engineers and musicians balance the needs of a recording audience and a live audience.


Humanity is turning into a 'different kind of animal,' Stanford historian says
Stanford classics Professor Ian Morris says that in the 21st century our cultural evolution is feeding back into our biological evolution. The result may be technologically enhanced "post-humans" as far removed from us as we are from Neanderthals.  


Stanford researchers make discovery in animal functional diversity
The finding refutes a hypothesis by the famed evolutionary biologist Stephen J. Gould that marine creatures underwent an "early burst" of functional diversity during the dawn of animal life.


Stanford fellow delves into archival materials that shed new light on the early days of Islam
Humanities Center fellow and historian of Islam Fred Donner builds on his theories about the diverse religious origins of Islam through an intensive study and translation of previously neglected or unknown documents from the seventh century.


Stanford scientists: Warming temperatures implicated in California droughts
In California, warm, dry years are more likely to lead to severe drought than dry, cool years, and the probability of warm and dry conditions coinciding is likely to climb.


'Go Global' spotlights international research, courses, events at Stanford
When faculty members add information on their international activities to their Stanford Profiles, that information – a journal article, course or research project – will automatically appear on the Go Global website.


New job classification program at Stanford aims to bring consistency, transparency and career opportunities
The Staff Career & Job Classification Program is part of an effort to bring more consistency and clarity across the university. It is the result of many years of planning and evaluation by University Human Resources.


Family members sample student life during Stanford Parents' Weekend
More than 3,800 family members visited campus for this year's Parents' Weekend. They spent two days roaming the campus to share in dozens of activities that offered a sampler of student life at Stanford. University photographer Linda Cicero captured some of the highlights.


Stanford poet Eavan Boland interrogates identity, nationhood in new collection
In A Woman Without a Country, English Professor Eavan Boland helps give voice to those who have been silenced in the official record of history.


Stanford Parents' Weekend 2015 opens Friday
Dozens of activities are planned for the 3,800 family members who are expected to visit campus during the two-day event.


Stanford students discover an early music treasure
Music lecturer and students edit and finish an incomplete manuscript by Francesco Durante for a modern-day première in Memorial Church.


Stanford Law School beats a path to the bench
Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan and circuit judges give SLS students an insider's look at becoming a judge.


Renowned Stanford poet Eavan Boland interrogates identity and nationhood in new collection
In her latest book of poetry, A Woman Without a Country, English Professor Eavan Boland draws on decades of thinking, reading and writing about subjects like nation and gender to help give voice to those who have been silenced in the official record of history.


Stanford students reflect on their meeting with President Obama
Ten Stanford undergraduates described President Barack Obama as personable and genuine as he discussed a wide range of global interests with them during a recent private meeting on campus.


High court should reconsider baseball's antitrust exemption, Stanford experts say
Stanford scholars offer perspective on Major League Baseball's antitrust exemption, which could come under review this spring if a San Jose lawsuit proceeds to the high court.


Thomas Gilligan will lead Stanford's Hoover Institution
Gilligan, a scholar of economics and political science, will assume his post on Sept. 1. He will succeed John Raisian, who has served more than 25 years at the helm of the public policy research center.


Patent trolls serve valuable role in innovation, Stanford expert says
Stanford political scientist Stephen Haber's research finds that much-maligned patent trolls actually offer inventors protection from potential bankruptcy and may help spur technological innovations.


Stanford scholar blazes pathway for academic study of asexuality
Drawing from her research into the growth of asexual communities and queer studies, Stanford lecturer Karli Cerankowski is shedding light on an under-studied and misunderstood facet of human sexuality: asexuality.


President John Hennessy statement to Faculty Senate


Senate approves proposals on coterminal degrees, principal investigators
Physics Professor Sarah Church, chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Standards and Policies, and physics Professor Peter Michelson, chair of the Committee on Research, presented proposals to the Faculty Senate yesterday.


European grain yield stagnation related to climate change, says Stanford scholar
After changes in government policy and farm practices, European grain yields leveled off. Stanford's Frances C. Moore says climate trends account for 10 percent of that stagnation.


Stanford expert calls for national security strategy toward failed states
Former U.S. Ambassador Karl Eikenberry says that U.S. military intervention should be the exception, not the norm, toward failed states like Syria, Iraq and Yemen.


Thomas Gilligan, business school dean at University of Texas, will lead Stanford's Hoover Institution
Gilligan, a scholar of economics and political science, will assume his post on Sept. 1. He will succeed John Raisian, who has served more than 25 years at the helm of the public policy research center.


Stanford study shows rural disadvantages under Obamacare
A Stanford study found that small, rural coverage regions under the Affordable Care Act have fewer insurers to choose from and higher prices relative to similar rural markets that get grouped in with larger urban markets nearby.


Senate to discuss coterminal degrees, principal investigators at SLAC
Physics Professor Sarah Church, chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Standards and Policies, will present a report on coterminal master's degrees. Physics Professor Peter Michelson, chair of the Committee on Research, will present a report on principal investigators at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.


Stanford scientists discover a protein's novel role in several types of cancers
ChEM-H scientists are helping to develop a cancer therapy based on a new finding of a protein that inadvertently promotes cancer growth. Blocking this protein could help block the growth of many types of tumors.


Stanford study: Animals tend to evolve toward larger sizes over time
In new research, Stanford paleobiologist Jonathan Payne says that animals tend to evolve toward larger body sizes over time. Over the past 542 million years, the mean size of marine animals has increased 150-fold.  


Campus prepares for White House Cybersecurity Summit
Among the faculty members participating in the White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection are President John Hennessy, George Triantis, John Mitchell and Jennifer Granick.


Stanford hosts summit on cybersecurity
Stanford hosts President Obama and business, government and academic officials as they tackle issues around cyber threats. Read the blog on "the day President Obama came to Stanford."


Two events take up cybersecurity topics before the White House summit
On the eve of the White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection, Stanford hosted two events related to privacy technologies and future research and education. The discussions addressed current and future challenges.


Trustees hear about School of Humanities and Sciences; approve tuition and four construction projects
The projects include a new photon science laboratory building at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and a new conference center and office building for the Hoover Institution.


Stanford hosts White House summit on cybersecurity
Stanford welcomed President Obama and business, government and academic officials as they tackle issues around cyber threats. Read full coverage of the day's events.


President Obama to visit Stanford for White House Cyber Summit
Stanford will welcome President Barack Obama to the campus Friday, Feb. 13, where he will address the White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection. 


Stanford study: How to encourage men to give to the poor
A Stanford study found that when men were told that poverty hurts everyone in society, their concern and willingness to contribute money increased, effectively closing a gender gap in charitable giving.


Stanford engineer produces free Braille-writer app
A touchscreen Braille writer developed during a Stanford engineering summer course is now an app that turns an iPad into an invaluable tool for blind and visually impaired people.


NBA commissioner visits Stanford for lesson in virtual reality
By flying like Superman in Jeremy Bailenson's Virtual Human Interaction Lab, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver was convinced that virtual reality could enhance the game for fans and players.


Senate visits the arts district to discuss the humanities
Richard Saller, dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences, and Debra Satz, senior associate dean for the humanities and arts, talked about the state of the humanities at Stanford. Jason Linetzky, director of the Anderson Collection, invited faculty members to collaborate with its staff and create new programs.


Stanford's Another Look book club takes on James Baldwin's The Fire Next Time
How far have we come toward achieving racial justice? Another Look book club discusses writer and activist James Baldwin's 1963 classic, The Fire Next Time.


Online polls open Monday at midnight for 2015-16 Faculty Senate
The senate, which is composed of 55 voting members serving staggered 2-year terms and 15 ex officio members, is the legislative body of Stanford's Academic Council, and has responsibility for academic and research policy, as well as the authority to grant degrees.


Stanford professor helps citizens make informed choices
With the help of a seed grant from the Office of International Affairs, communications Professor James Fishkin is expanding his approach to community engagement across the globe, and most recently to East Africa.


Kaboom! Stanford professor shares Academy Award
Computerized simulation simplifies the math and physics of animated movie collisions to create a point-click-and-drag tool for putting the kibosh on buildings, cities, even planets.


Senate to meet at Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Members of the Faculty Senate will hear reports on the state of the humanities at Stanford, as well as an introduction to the Anderson Collection at Stanford University. They also will receive a guided tour of the collection when the meeting adjourns.


For Stanford Symphony Orchestra, 'The Planets' align
Stanford Symphony Orchestra blends sight and sound with a production of Gustav Hoist's "The Planets" at Bing Concert Hall. The production  is part of Imagining the Universe, a collaborative year-long project of the Stanford Arts Institute.


Stanford research activities expand undergraduate education
Faculty mentors introduce students to the rigors of academic research in every field from engineering to the humanities.


Stanford research shows dramatic differences in poverty throughout U.S.
A new Stanford report shows that conventional national statistics conceal dramatic differences throughout all 50 U.S. states in poverty, income inequality and mobility.


In new online course, Stanford scholar delves into the secrets of medieval texts
Digital tools, including a free, public online manuscript training course, are allowing English professor and medieval manuscript scholar Elaine Treharne to share her expertise well beyond traditional classroom walls.


Meyer Library demolition begins Feb. 4; concrete to be crushed on site
When Meyer is gone, Stanford will create a landscaped open space on the site, with walkways, benches and gentle slopes surrounded by trees.


Stanford historian explores how gender analysis leads to innovation
Working with an international team, Stanford history Professor Londa Schiebinger has used gender analysis to spark discovery in science and innovation in technology.


Carl Djerassi, Stanford professor and world-renowned chemist, dead at 91
In his long career, Stanford chemist Carl Djerassi excelled in science and the arts. He may be remembered most as the father of the birth control pill.


Anna Marie Zarate Porras, dead at 48
Porras, an alumna who had worked at Stanford since 1991, recently received the inaugural Office of Development Distinguished Service Award.


Stanford launches major effort to expedite vaccine discovery with $50 million grant
Researchers will seek to understand how the immune system can be harnessed to develop vaccines for the world's most deadly infectious diseases.


Learn math without fear, Stanford expert says
Professor Jo Boaler says students most effectively learn "math facts" working on problems they enjoy, rather than through exercises and drills they fear. Timed testing and blind memorization damage children's experience of math, she says.


Face blindness predicted by differences in the brain, Stanford scientists discover
Differences in connectivity in the brain predict face blindness in adults, say Stanford neuroscientists. They plan to observe these surprising differences in children to discover how this visual deficit develops.


Human dispersal, evolution of languages show strong link, Stanford biologists find
In the largest comparison of genetic and linguistic data ever attempted, Stanford biologists find that features of language show a strong link to the geographic dispersal of human populations.


What would you ask Tony Award-winning choreographer Bill T. Jones?
Jones and his dance company perform on campus and the choreographer carves out time to engage with students in writing before his visit and in person once he arrives.


Super Bowl ads not profitable for competing brands, Stanford scholar says
A Stanford study finds that Super Bowl television commercials for beer and soda may generate sales, but when two major brands of the same type run competing ads, the sales benefits disappear.


Stanford bioengineers develop tool for reprogramming genetic code
By selectively manipulating how DNA issues biological commands, Stanford bioengineers have developed a tool that could prove useful in future gene therapies.


Tax reform could reduce wealth inequality gap, Stanford scholar says
Stanford Law Professor Joseph Bankman discusses eight tax policies aimed at reducing inequality among the wealthiest Americans and the rest of society. 


Stanford scientists use ocean waves to monitor oil and gas fields
New technique exploits naturally occurring seismic waves to probe seafloor at less expense, and with fewer ill effects on marine life caused by air guns in use today.


Stanford's 'Live Context' series explores art and its ideas
Leveraging the university’s deep intellectual and artistic resources, "Live Context" is inspired by the conviction that the more you know about a work of art's historical and contemporary resonance the richer your experience.


Concussions – an issue for male and female athletes alike, Stanford professor says
William Maloney, professor of orthopaedic surgery, told the Faculty Senate on Thursday that while concussions are a problem in football, they also are a big concern in other sports, including soccer, water polo and club sports, involving both male and female players. University Architect David Lenox gave a report on new buildings on campus and those under construction.


Stanford scholar explores Arabic obsession with language
Comparative literature professor Alexander Key finds that the Arab world had a head start on the West when it comes to understanding how language works.


Faculty Senate to hear reports on capital planning, athletes' head trauma on Thursday


Stanford scientists team with indigenous people to study carbon
By teaching basic ecology field work techniques to indigenous groups in the Amazon, Stanford researchers find that satellite measurements of rainforests underestimate the region's carbon storage potential.


Campus looks to expand housing options for faculty, staff
Stanford has recently entered into an agreement to lease a 167-unit apartment complex currently under construction near the border of Los Altos, Palo Alto and Mountain View, to help make additional rental housing available for faculty and staff.


Greater regulation not necessary for Internet, Stanford scholar says
The historical record is a cautionary tale when it comes to net neutrality, according to Stanford economist Bruce M. Owen. Too much regulation, he says, may harm consumers while hobbling innovation and competition.


Perovskites provide big boost to silicon solar cells: Stanford study
Putting a film of the crystalline material perovskite on top of a silicon solar cell increases the cell's efficiency nearly 50 percent, say Stanford scientists.


Margot Gerritsen to receive 2014 Richard W. Lyman Award
The award recognizes faculty who go above and beyond to engage alumni on campus, regionally and around the world.


Stanford senior awarded 2015-16 Churchill Scholarship
Sophie E. Miller, a chemical engineering major at Stanford, is one of 14 Americans "of exceptional ability and outstanding achievement" who have been awarded Churchill Scholarships to study at the University of Cambridge in England for one year.


Understanding conflict is the road to peace, prosperity, Stanford scholar says
The Empirical Studies of Conflict project focuses on the causes and characteristics of politically motivated violence.


Perovskites provide big boost to silicon solar cells, Stanford study finds
Putting a film of the crystalline material perovskite on top of a silicon solar cell increases the cell's efficiency nearly 50 percent, say Stanford scientists.


Stanford engineers use brilliant X-rays to illuminate catalysis, revise theories
Using high-brilliance X-rays in a new way, Stanford engineers observed electrons at work during catalytic reactions. Their findings challenge long-held theories about some catalysts, opening the door to new or improved renewable energy applications.


Artificial intelligence helps Stanford physicists predict dangerous solar flares
Though scientists do not completely understand what triggers solar flares, Stanford solar physicists Monica Bobra and Sebastien Couvidat have automated the analysis of those gigantic explosions.


Chuck Feeney: Stanford's quiet change-maker
Although you won't find his name anywhere on campus, Chuck Feeney is behind some of Stanford's most innovative facilities, from Campus Drive to the heart of the Medical Center.


Stanford engineers develop a device for measuring how birds take flight
A new device invented by David Lentink will answer long-held questions about the forces birds generate while flying, and could lead to the development of innovative, efficient unmanned aerial vehicles.


John Githongo to visit Stanford as this year's Haas Center Distinguished Visitor
An internationally renowned activist and journalist who exposed government corruption in Kenya, Githongo will spend 10 weeks on campus interacting with students, faculty and community groups.


The industrial revolution of the oceans will imperil wildlife, says Stanford scientist
In a new report, Steve Palumbi and colleagues show that the industrialization of the oceans mirrors the early stages of activities that have triggered mass extinctions on land.


Stanford to host White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection


New mobile app from Stanford and Sony lets phone conduct research while it charges
Stanford's Vijay Pande has partnered with Sony to bring his Folding@home project to smartphones. The work could provide critical insight into the biology of diseases and lead the way to potential new treatments.


Estimated social cost of climate change not accurate, Stanford scientists say
The "social cost" of carbon dioxide emissions may not be $37 per ton, as estimated by a recent U.S. government study, but $220 per ton.


New Stanford research finds computers are better judges of personality
Stanford researchers have found that computers can judge personality traits more accurately than one's friends and colleagues. In fact, artificial intelligence can draw inferences about a person as accurately as a spouse.


Stanford website about comedian Richard Pryor's early years reveals history of race
With maps, photos, news clippings and written artifacts, "Richard Pryor's Peoria" offers an online tool to learn about segregation, urban renewal and the roots of Pryor's comedy.


Campus mourns death of student Jalen Paukan
The Stanford community is grieving the death of Jalen Jimmy Paukan, a senior from remote St. Mary's, Alaska, who was an active member of the Stanford Native American community.


Misfit or Miss Goody Two Shoes? Adolescent misperceptions abound: Stanford researcher
Researchers at Stanford and UNC-Chapel Hill find that teens are influenced by "caricatures" of their peers' sex lives and drug use.


Stanford-led study says China's aquaculture can tip balance in world fish supplies
China's booming aquaculture industry relies on fishmeal made from wild-caught fish. This practice depletes wild fish stocks and strains fragile ocean ecosystems, but a new study offers a more sustainable path.


Stanford students illustrate public online 'Adventures in Writing' class
Veteran writing instructors and undergraduate student artists teamed up to create a new public online course focused on teaching key strategies for effective writing.


Here's what's cooking: Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver helps launch cooking class program at Stanford
The program is designed to teach students hands-on cooking skills and educate them about building healthy eating habits.


Stanford researchers measure concussion forces in detail
Although the mechanisms of concussions are still being revealed, David Camarillo's lab has measured the forces imparted on the brain in greater detail than ever before. The goal: better injury detection and prevention.


New Stanford course brings Silicon Valley to the humanities classroom
Students from computer science and the humanities join forces to create literary websites and mobile apps, combining their strengths to launch literature into the 21st century.


Resolutions linked to 'ideal self' most effective, Stanford psychologist says
Stanford psychologist Kelly McGonigal says when people resolve to change, they immediately feel more confident, in control and hopeful.


Q&A: Stanford's Mark Lemley on intellectual property law
Professor Mark Lemley talks about the impact of court rulings on software patents and the tech industry's pressure on Congress for reform.


Stanford fans cheer the Cardinal to victory in the Foster Farms Bowl
The Stanford Cardinal faced off against the Maryland Terrapins in the Foster Farms Bowl in Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif. on Dec. 30, 2014. An enthusiastic crowd of Cardinal fans celebrated a 45-21 win.


Q&A: Stanford's Mark Lemley on the changing landscape in intellectual property law
Intellectual property expert Mark Lemley talks about the impact of court rulings on software patents and the tech industry's pressure on Congress for reform.


Making spirits bright at Stanford
As the year draws to a close, Stanford singers prepare for holiday concerts while around campus, students take a break from studying  to enjoy some holiday traditions.


Stanford arts don't take a break
Cantor Arts Center and the Anderson Collection at Stanford University are open over the holiday season. Closed only on Tuesdays, Christmas Day and New Year's Day.


Veteran employment falls as disability enrollment climbs, Stanford study shows
Research by Stanford economist Mark Duggan shows that the rise in disability coverage for military veterans may be hurting them in making employment gains.


Altruism is not simply innate, Stanford study finds
By recreating a classic experiment, Stanford psychologists find that altruistic behavior may be governed more by relationships, even brief ones, than instincts.


Stanford scholar spotlights Catalan journalist
A ban on the Catalan language left the voluminous works of Spanish writer and journalist Josep Pla unrecognized for decades, but Stanford Professor Joan Ramon Resina is resurrecting Pla's reputation.


Stanford chemists take step toward solving mystery of how enzymes work
Enzymes are crucial for assisting virtually all biological processes, but there has been little consensus on how they work. Steven Boxer and his students have found that the electrostatic field within an enzyme accounts for the lion's share of its success.


Stanford study shows ways to improve public health at beaches
Thanks to new Stanford research, an affordable, easy-to-implement system can provide significantly more accurate information on coastal water contamination to better protect public health.


Stanford team combines logic, memory to build a 'high-rise' chip
Stanford researchers are building layers of logic and memory into skyscraper chips that are smaller, faster, cheaper – and taller.


Stanford to host 100-year study on artificial intelligence
Stanford University will lead a 100-year effort to study the long-term implications of artificial intelligence in all aspects of life.


Spirituality shaped through culture, according to Stanford anthropologist
Stanford anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann compared the religious experiences of Buddhists in Thailand and evangelical Christians in the United States.


Stanford admits 743 early applicants to the Class of 2019
Stanford has sent acceptance letters to 743 high school students who sought admission to the Class of 2019 under the university's early admission program.


Architect David Adjaye tells Stanford audience how he designs civic spaces
Designer of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, David Adjaye described how he sees civic buildings as fulcrums of emotion and memory that engage with people.


Stanford faculty awarded seed grants for innovative energy research
Stanford's Precourt Institute, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and TomKat Center have awarded eight seed grants to Stanford faculty for early-stage energy research.


Grand jury system flawed in Ferguson case but still valuable for investigations, Stanford law professor says
The prosecutor in the Ferguson police death case may have distorted the grand jury process to address problems in the case, says Stanford law professor Robert Weisberg.


Rains to provide short-term relief for California drought, says Stanford researcher
Daniel Swain said the upcoming rainstorms – among the largest in recent years – will provide a respite to California's drought, by far the state's most intense in the historical record.


Trustees approve Redwood City administrative campus
The administrative campus will blend a sense of warmth with a contemporary aesthetic, and reflect the qualitative aspects of the main campus, such as intimate courtyards, gateways and public spaces.


Stanford University reports FY 2014 financial results


Stanford d.school students 'humanize' a truck for a good cause
Stanford students get their hands dirty designing and rebuilding a truck to serve the specific needs of San Jose's Tech Museum of Innovation.


Stanford forms new Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning
By combining resources of the Center for Teaching and Learning, parts of Academic Computing Services, the CourseWork engineering team and the Office of the Vice Provost for Online Learning, the new organization will provide better coordination between groups that support teaching, learning and reaching learners online.


Faculty survey finds high engagement, interest in undergraduate teaching
Stanford faculty members want to spend more time teaching undergraduates and are interested in improving the way they teach, but the professoriate also recommends that teaching receive more recognition within the university culture, according to the first systematic study of undergraduate teaching across all seven Stanford schools.


Obama names Stanford's Ashton Carter as secretary of defense
If confirmed by the Senate, Ashton Carter, a Stanford visiting scholar with deep experience in international defense issues, will become the U.S. secretary of defense.


Conference, memorial set for Ron McKinnon
A Jan. 9-10 conference and memorial are planned in honor of Stanford economist Ron McKinnon, who died Oct. 1 at age 79. McKinnon was an applied economist whose primary interests were international economics and economic development.


Stanford scholar reveals the surprising cultural history of four-hand piano playing
German studies professor Adrian Daub examines the social mores of 19th-century Europe through a study of "four-handed monsters."


Where the wild winds blow: Stanford engineers use weather models to site offshore wind farms
Stanford engineers enlist weather models to find the best place on the map for a grid of four wind farms in the ocean off the U.S. East Coast.


Stanford study to try cold cash and social game to relieve rush hour traffic
Sleeping in might never feel better. To lower traffic congestion and pollution, a new program seeks to get Stanford drivers to avoid arriving and departing the campus during peak hours. Professor Balaji Prabhakar aims to deliver social benefits at low cost using people's penchant for a chance at a bigger payout over a predetermined small reward.


Stanford sends notification to the Class of 2016
Stanford has invited 2,427 high school students to join the Class of 2016.


Stanford economist narrows China's education gap with research, technology and policy
Stanford economist Scott Rozelle says 80 percent of urban Chinese students have Internet access, compared with 2 percent of their rural peers, a gap that jeopardizes China's economic future.


Interpreting an artist's intent involves a team of experts at Stanford's Cantor Arts Center
Staying true to the artist and the artwork is at the heart of each decision made by museum curators, conservators and preparators while installing works by Dan Flavin and Robert Irwin.


Q&A: Stanford's Dr. Jay Bhattacharya explains what's at stake in debate over health care
With legal arguments at the Supreme Court over, the fate of the Obama administration's health care law is in the hands of the justices. Stanford's Jay Bhattacharya, a professor of medicine and a health economist, explains how consumers could be affected.


Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project awards $8.4 million to develop innovative energy technologies
Seven Stanford research teams will receive GCEP funding to develop innovative energy technologies.


Dean Larry Kramer to leave Stanford Law School to lead Hewlett Foundation
Larry Kramer, dean of the Stanford Law School since 2004, is leaving at the end of August to become president of the Hewlett Foundation. Kramer is credited with transforming the law school physically and programmatically.


Marsha Friberg Shinkman, former assistant director of Stanford in Washington, dead at 69
As assistant director of the Bing Stanford in Washington Program for a decade, Shinkman organized field trips and cultural events for students, and served as an adviser to students on life in the nation's capital.


Small dams on Mekong River tributaries could harm fish and people, Stanford researcher finds
Planned dams in Southeast Asia would affect fish productivity and biodiversity in the world's largest inland fishery, says Stanford researcher Guy Ziv.


Lythcott-Haims stepping down as dean of freshmen and undergraduate advising
Julie Lythcott-Haims, known affectionately to students as "Dean Julie," came to Stanford as a freshman in 1985. She is leaving her position as associate vice provost for undergraduate education and dean of freshmen and undergraduate advising in June to pursue her passion for writing as a master of fine arts student in poetry.


At Stanford forum, Christie calls long GOP primary contest 'stupid'
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie touts job growth, spending cuts during a Hoover speech, as he also knocks the drawn-out GOP primary fight.


Stanford engineers find elusive plasmons in tiny metal particles, a boost to nanotechnology
Discovery by Stanford engineers of plasmons in atomic-scale particles promises to push nanotechnology into a new realm that could affect fields from cancer treatment to solar catalysis.


Stanford opens research center at Peking University
The Stanford Center at Peking University is available to the several hundred Stanford scholars studying, researching and conducting university activities in China each year. It will also be a hub for Stanford faculty to share ideas and teach occasional classes.


Learning how to speak 'American'
Since the beginning of winter quarter, Christopher Stroop, a PhD candidate in history, and Meng "Melissa" Xu, a graduate student in materials science and engineering, have been exploring American English through the medium of song.


Now, brought to the big screen by physicists at SLAC: the universe
Dramatic 3-D videos, created from actual data, show the origins of the universe. Now playing on screens at SLAC, as well as museums in San Francisco and New York.


Stanford researcher cooks up the courtly culture of Europe in the 1600's
Study of 17th-century food and dining practices yields compelling cultural information about a society struggling to rebuild after the Thirty Years War. Note: They ate a lot of meat, and everyone drank beer.


Stanford robots clash in class finale
Amid a cheering audience, student robots faced off in a "mechatronics" class showdown. In a nod to the political season, the autonomous machines raced to transport poker chips for Michelle Botman or Team Robama.


From glovebox to archive: Private collector gives huge trove of road maps to Stanford libraries
Robert Berlo's collection of 13,000 is a gold mine for studying the growth of the West in the 20th century.


Early spring drives down butterfly population, Stanford study shows
Scientists find that an early snowmelt drives down the population of Mormon fritillary butterflies by reducing their favored nectar supply and killing off caterpillars that die during early-season frosts.


Software allows users to protect personal, university data stored on mobile devices
Stanford's new Mobile Device Management software is available for free to faculty, students and staff with active SUNet IDs.


Brook H. Byers will join Stanford's Board of Trustees in April
Brook H. Byers, the newest member of Stanford's Board of Trustees, has had a distinguished career in venture capital at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, one of Silicon Valley's most prominent venture capital firms.


Innovative Stanford class project turns urban studies students into filmmakers
A spatial documentarian, an urban historian and a film editor team up to teach students the power of storytelling and how to communicate their understanding of history through filmmaking.


Stanford marine biologists search for the world's strongest coral
Stanford researchers are combing the South Pacific for the world's strongest coral with a goal of protecting reefs from climate change.


Stanford researchers create exotic electrons that may lead to new materials, devices
Researchers from Stanford  and SLAC have created the first-ever system of "designer electrons" – exotic variants of ordinary electrons with tunable properties that may ultimately lead to new types of materials and devices.


Knight Management Center Awarded LEED Platinum Rating For Environmental Sustainability
The Knight Management Center at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, an eight-building complex that opened in April 2011, has achieved the LEED Platinum rating for environmental sustainability from the U.S. Green Building Council.


Q&A: Stanford's Hazel Markus on how college culture may affect first-generation students
New research suggests students who are the first in their families to go to college may be at an academic disadvantage at schools that emphasize independence.


Genetic analysis of ancient 'Iceman' mummy traces ancestry from Alps to Mediterranean isle
The sequencing of the genome of a 5,300-year-old mummy found in the Italian Alps gave researchers a surprising answer as to where his ancestors most likely came from.


Terman Engineering Center is gone, but not lost
The Department of Project Management diverted 99.6 percent of the demolished Terman Engineering Center from landfill through recycling or reuse. The resulting vacant lot will become temporarily available as an open space.


Artist takes performance to new heights at Stanford biological preserve
Visiting artist Ann Carlson brings her background in dance, choreography, theater, visual art and performance art to an unlikely stage – Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve in the eastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains.


Stanford scholars deconstruct Middle East uprisings by looking at Europe's past
From Prague Spring to Arab Spring: Stanford historians compare past movements to today's revolutions.


Stanford lectures, research examine sexuality, religion and the cosmos
Lectures, classes and research highlight how gender studies transform the way scholars understand religious traditions.


DuPont joins Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project
DuPont is GCEP's newest corporate sponsor, joining ExxonMobil, GE, Schlumberger and Toyota in support of innovative research on sustainable energy technologies.


An exploration of human and electronic sound on Stanford's CCRMA Stage
Two new music luminaries visit Stanford while in the Bay Area for performances with the San Francisco Symphony.


Reminder: Vote in this year's Faculty Senate election!


Senate approves Thinking Matters courses as freshman requirement, strongly encourages students to take freshman seminars
After a lively hour-long discussion, the Faculty Senate on Thursday approved a proposal requiring freshmen to take one Thinking Matters course beginning in 2012-13 and "strongly" encouraging first-year students to take freshman seminars.


Stanford visiting artist Ellen Lake creates a cultural paradox across decades
Experimental Media Art Lab enables artist to innovate with state-of-the-art equipment.


Senate to discuss new freshman-year requirements and revisions to policies on faculty conflict of interest and outside consulting activities
The Faculty Senate on Thursday will discuss proposed changes to the freshman year and proposed revisions to policies on faculty conflict of interest and on outside consulting activities. Votes are required to enact the three proposals.


Stanford Humanities Center hosts annual celebration of publications
From history and poetry to music and philosophy, the 19th annual event showcased the wide-ranging scope of humanities scholarship at Stanford.


Stanford experts say Silicon Valley is poised to play a key role as Japan restructures its power industry
On the anniversary of Japan's deadly quake and tsunami, Stanford experts say alternative energy will drive innovation and help restructure power industry.


Searsville Dam steering committee wrestling with complex issues
The steering committee studying the future of Searsville Dam and Reservoir is preparing to engage consultants, while continuing discussions with local organizations and residents, as it begins sorting through the complicated issues governing the dam's fate.


Stanford offers more free online classes for the world
In an ongoing experiment to leverage new educational technologies, the university is launching five free online classes this month.


Trans-Atlantic bond between the Keats brothers was a poetic inspiration, Stanford scholar says
Stanford English Professor Denise Gigante examines the life of John Keats through the lens of his relationship with his American immigrant brother.


Q&A: Margot Gerritsen on the critical need for energy literacy in the US
Americans need to be energy literate to make wise decisions about energy use, says Stanford's Margot Gerritsen.


In sub-Saharan Africa, a shorter walk to water saves lives, Stanford study finds
Most homes in sub-Saharan Africa lack running water. A new study by Stanford researchers shows that reducing the amount of time spent fetching water can improve the health of young children in this region.


Stanford researchers bring life to high school history classes with a curriculum built around historical documents
A partnership between Stanford and San Francisco schools gives students a new way to learn about the past by reading historical documents instead of textbooks.


Google Waltz Lab teaches Stanford students to think on their feet
Renowned Stanford dance instructor Richard Powers teaches the value of improvisation on the dance floor and beyond.


Sea turtles surf an ocean highway to safer habitat, Stanford research suggests
New research using computer simulations suggests strong currents off the coast of Costa Rica may help whisk newborn leatherback turtles to a safer habitat in deep water. The research could lead to better conservation efforts.


At the Cantor: Innovations that established the reputations of five contemporary artists
The best tools to teach art history are works of art seen in person. A new Cantor exhibition helps students learn about abstraction and postwar art movements.


Parents' Weekend gives families a glimpse of what Stanford has to offer
More than 3,800 moms, dads and other family members flocked to campus for this year's Parents' Weekend. University Photographer Linda Cicero captured some of the highlights for a slideshow.


First acts announced for the opening of Stanford's Bing Concert Hall
The San Francisco Symphony, Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Los Lobos and Stanford's ensemble in residence, the St. Lawrence String Quartet, are among the first performers scheduled to appear at the Bing.


Seeking harmony of body and mind at Stanford through Shaolin Kung Fu
"The big plus is that I'm learning real kung fu from real Shaolin monks, whom I would have no access to if I were still in China – all under the California sun," said one Stanford staffer enrolled in a campus Shaolin Kung Fu class.


Parents enjoy shunshine, lectures and their kids
The annual Parents' Weekend, held this past weekend, featured faculty lectures, student performances and tours of new Stanford facilities. Parents say they enjoyed the festivities - not to mention the chance to see their kids.


Athletics mourns the passing of equipment manager Ron Yamaguchi
Members of the Department of Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation (DAPER) are mourning the passing of Ron Yamaguchi, an assistant equipment manager.


Take a campus tour - at your desk or on foot - with enhanced podcast
Download an enhanced podcast and take a long, easy stroll of new sights at Stanford – handsome buildings, flowering gardens, light-filled courtyards, shaded arcades – that begins and ends with art.


Senate engages in lively discussions on freshman-year requirements, faculty conflicts of interest
At yesterday's Faculty Senate meeting, members discussed the pros and cons of requiring students to take freshman seminars – a central recommendation of the Study of Undergraduate Education at Stanford (SUES).


Kavli researchers say galaxy may swarm with 'nomad planets'
Our galaxy may be awash in homeless planets, wandering through space instead of orbiting a star, according to a new study by researchers at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology.


About 3,800 family members expected for Parents' Weekend, Feb. 24 and 25
Faculty lectures remain the most popular offering at Parents' Weekend, an annual event designed to allow family members to experience Stanford academics and student life.


Voting under way for next year's Faculty Senate
Voting is under way to elect the 45th Senate of the Academic Council. The voting, which began at midnight, Feb. 21, ends at 11:59 p.m., March 10.


Stanford engineers create wireless, self-propelled medical device
For 50 years, scientists searched for the secret to making tiny implantable devices that could travel through the bloodstream. Engineers at Stanford have demonstrated just such a device.


Conflict of interest policy, new freshman year requirements on senate agenda
The Faculty Senate on Thursday will discuss revising Stanford's conflict of interest policy for faculty and implementing new breadth requirements for freshmen, including a "Thinking Matters" course and a Freshman Seminar.


Cantor exhibition showcases Stanford's collection of Native American paintings
The exhibition presents examples of a 20th-century painting style on paper reimagining centuries-old artistic traditions.


Rare Judeo-Spanish memoir gives a voice to the people of a lost culture
Historians Aron Rodrigue and Sarah Abrevaya Stein bring the history of Ottoman Jews to life in a text published by Stanford University Press.


Redwood City takes up Stanford building proposals
The Redwood City Planning Commission's review of Stanford's proposed Redwood City redevelopment project begins today, Feb. 21, with a public hearing. The Planning Commission will review a draft environmental impact report and draft precise plan for a proposed 35-acre development off Highway 101.


Q&A: Stanford's Morris Fiorina on Santorum's rise and a dissatisfied Republican Party
Political science Professor Morris Fiorina explains the topsy-turvy Republican primaries and the recent surge by Rick Santorum.


Stanford alumna named a 2012 Gates Cambridge Scholar
Sarah Mummah, a Stanford alumna and founder of DreamCatchers, a tutoring and mentoring program for middle school students in Palo Alto, was recently selected as a 2012 Gates Cambridge Scholar.


Look for new roles for older citizens in an aging America, says Stanford's Laura Carstensen
The country's percentage of older people is rising rapidly. But that's not just a problem, says Laura Carstensen, an expert on aging, it's also a chance to improve transportation, redesign the suburbs and gain from the talents and experience of our elders.


New Stanford unit seeks educational initiatives for middle and high school students
Stanford has brought several programs designed to enrich the educational experiences of middle and high school students under one roof, a new administrative unit known as Stanford Pre-Collegiate Studies.


International interactive artist Camille Utterback delivers public lecture at Stanford
The renowned artist, known for her interactive installations and reactive sculptures, teaches an art practice course to undergraduates on campus.


State-owned oil companies increase price volatility and pollution, Stanford researcher says
State-owned companies dominate the world's oil supplies, and politicians often cannot resist getting involved. That involvement, though, is tied to excessive pollution, poor company performance and more volatile oil prices, according to a new Stanford book.


Trustees give site OKs for SLAC science and user support building and campus energy center
At its meeting last week, the Stanford Board of Trustees moved forward on plans for a science buidling and an energy center, both of which are part of $438 million Stanford Energy System Innovations project.


Gap between rich and poor students is widening, Stanford study finds
The gap in test scores between rich and poor students has grown steadily since the 1960s and is now nearly twice as large as the black-white achievement gap, according to research by Sean Reardon, associate professor of education.


President Obama gives the National Humanities Medal to Stanford literary scholar Ramón Saldívar
Saldívar receives a 2011 National Humanities Medal in honor of his cultural explorations of the U.S-Mexico border.


Steven A. Denning elected chair of Stanford University Board of Trustees
Steven A. Denning, co-chair of The Stanford Challenge, was recently elected chair of the Stanford University Board of Trustees. His two-year term begins in July.


Gap between rich and poor students in widening, Stanford study finds
The gap in test scores between rich and poor students has grown steadily since the 1960s and is now nearly twice as large as the black-white achievement gap, according to research by Sean Reardon, associate professor of education.


Stanford engineers weld nanowires with light
At the nano level, researchers at Stanford have discovered a new way to weld together meshes of tiny wires. Their work could lead to innovative electronics and solar applications.


Stanford scholar chronicles evolution of Chinese love through texts
Stanford Professor Haiyan Lee chronicles the Chinese "love revolution" through a study of cultural changes influenced by Western ideals.


Not for profit: Why democracy needs the humanities
Author and philosopher Martha Nussbaum says a declining emphasis on the study of the humanities could lead to a world of "useful profit makers with no imaginations."


Student leaders, dean of the School of Earth Sciences address senate
A student leader told the Faculty Senate yesterday that some students would find professors more approachable if faculty members made it clear "on day one" that office hours are a place to talk, not just about classes but about life in general.


Stanford engineers' nanoshell whispering galleries improve thin solar panels
Engineers at Stanford have created photovoltaic nanoshells that harness a peculiar physical phenomenon to better trap light. The results could dramatically improve the efficiency of thin-film solar cells while reducing their weight and cost.


Stanford concludes transformative campaign
The Stanford Challenge fundraising campaign raises $6.2 billion for a new model of research and teaching on the environment, human health, international affairs and other issues.


Senate to hear reports from Dean Pamela Matson and from ASSU leaders
Pamela Matson, dean of the School of Earth Sciences, will present a report to the Faculty Senate today. Four student representatives to the Faculty Senate also will give presentations, including Michael Cruz, ASSU president, and Kamil Dada, ASSU Graduate Student Council representative.


Stanford study suggests girls can 'rewire' brains to ward off depression
Psychologists use brain imaging and a video game to help girls teach their brains not to overreact to stress.


Dancers perform Anna Sokolow’s Rooms
Multi-layered dance project celebrates the work and life of an American master artist whose work is deeply informed by her Jewish heritage, working-class roots and progressive politics.


As Chinese courts announce 'guiding cases,' Stanford Law School helps to spread the word
A Stanford website translates important rulings by the Supreme People's Court that serve as guides for lower courts, helping the vast country to move toward more consistent judicial decisions.


Stanford geophysicist: More environmental rules needed for shale gas
Obama's new rule is only one step toward ensuring the safety of hydraulic fracturing, the booming technology that offers economic and environmental benefits, according to Stanford geophysicist and DOE adviser Mark Zoback.


Aphasia: A Stanford music professor's work about obsessive attention to ridiculous things
Mangled vocal samples, random icons and precise hand gestures come together in a mesmerizing performance by Stanford music scholar Mark Applebaum.


Q&A: Stanford's Philip Taubman on an unlikely alliance to rid the world of nuclear weapons
In a new book, former New York Times reporter Philip Taubman tells the story of five famous men who have joined efforts to eliminate the ultimate weapon.


New generation explores cultural changes through Asian music at Stanford festival
Students pay homage to cultural history in the eighth annual Pan-Asian Music Festival.


Wireless power could revolutionize highway transportation, Stanford researchers say
Stanford researchers have designed a new technology that could lead to wireless charging of electric vehicles while they cruise down the highway.


Iconic photos of the Great Depression among the highlights in Cantor's Walker Evans exhibit
In public programs, Stanford scholars share their views on the groundbreaking artistic endeavors of photographer Walker Evans.


Stanford, Columbia get a joint $30 million gift for media innovation
Longtime Cosmopolitan editor Helen Gurley Brown has given Stanford's School of Engineering and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism $30 million to establish the David and Helen Gurley Brown Institute for Media Innovation.


Initiative aims to improve services for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students
The Weiland Health Initiative, a new partnership between the Vaden Health Center and the LGBT Community Resources Center, aims to improve health services for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students, while helping the Stanford community better understand how to meet those students' needs.


Astronomer Andrea Ghez to highlight ever-improving technology for studying space in annual Bunyan lecture
How scientists are bringing our galaxy's supermassive black hole and its environs into focus with laser guide star adaptive optics.


Tanner Lectures explore ancient philosophies as ways of life
You don't have to be a philosopher to contemplate the nature of the universe, the nature of the self, and the meaning of life.


Faculty Senate to hear report on reimagining undergraduate education
The Study of Undergraduate Education at Stanford University says students need "breathing space" to engage with issues of substance in a deep and sustained way, something not always possible in today's frenetic, multitasking world. The eagerly anticipated report will be presented today to the Faculty Senate.


Four decades - and counting - of feminist journalism
At a Stanford panel discussion, editors, activists and bloggers come together to salute Ms. magazine and consider the future.


The feminist struggle continues, Gloria Steinem says, encouraging a Stanford audience toward 'one new subversive thing'
The co-founder of Ms. magazine celebrates the 40th anniversary of the pioneering publication.


Give undergraduates the 'gift' of adaptive learning, committee tells senate
Developing the capacity for integrative knowledge is one of the "most crucial gifts" Stanford University can give undergraduates, James T. Campbell, co-chair of a university committee on undergraduate education, told the Faculty Senate yesterday.


Women report more pain than men, says study of electronic records
Women report more-intense pain than men in virtually every disease category, say investigators at the School of Medicine who mined a huge collection of electronic medical records to establish the broad gender difference.


The Thinker, one of the most famous works of art in the world, comes home to Stanford's Cantor Arts Center
Auguste Rodin's The Thinker returns to the Stanford campus after a two-year loan to the North Carolina Museum of Art.


Historian Lyman Van Slyke awarded Lyman Award from alumni association
An annual service award named for former Stanford President Richard Lyman this year goes to a Chinese historian whose leadership of 35 alumni travel/study trips totals more than a year.


Stanford scholars reflect on Arab Spring
A year after the Egyptian uprising, five scholars talk about democracy in the Middle East, how lives have changed in the Arab world, and what the United States has learned from the Arab Spring.


Stanford software lets aero-engineering students focus on aircraft design instead of computer code
Stanford University Unstructured is an open-source software package that gives advanced engineering students a crucial leg up on the time-consuming process of writing their own code to optimize aerospace designs.


The Thinker, one of the world's most famous works of art, comes home to Stanford's Cantor Arts Center
Auguste Rodin's The Thinker returns to the Stanford campus after a two-year loan to the North Carolina Museum of Art.


Stanford's 2012 Tanner Lectures explore ancient philosophies as ways of life
Princeton philosophy Professor John Cooper will give this year's Tanner Lectures on Human Values. To Cooper, many of the ancient philosophers intended not just to educate, but to offer their students a way of life.


Elliott Levinthal, Stanford professor emeritus of mechanical engineering, dead at 89
In a career that ranged from radar to medicine to outer space, Elliott Levinthal played an instrumental role in the schools of Engineering and Medicine, and in the rise of Silicon Valley.


Gloria Steinem: Still angry, still funny, still tireless
"I'm on campuses a lot, very different kinds of schools," Gloria Steinem said. "I still get asked, 'How can I [the student] combine motherhood and career?' and I tell them, 'Until men are asking that same question, you can't.'"


Stanford's International Travel Assistance Program offers peace of mind 24/7


How the Finnish school system outshines U.S. education
Educational philosophy in Finland is strikingly different than in the United States, but the students there outperform U.S. learners.


Energy efficiency paves way to a low-carbon future, but barriers persist


Writer hopes Arab Spring can be an antidote to terror


It's all about the space at Stanford's design school
Stanford's d.school space is the stage for creative collaboration. A new book by two of its leaders provides direction for design spaces elsewhere.


Take a tour of the virtual future at Stanford
If you want to see what your living room is likely to look like four years from now, take a tour of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab, which has reopened after a major renovation. Tours are offered to the general public most Fridays at 4 p.m.


Stanford scholar talks about the national memorial honoring Martin Luther King Jr.
Clayborne Carson, director of Stanford's Martin Luther King Institute, drew on his vast knowledge of King as he advised urban planners, architects and designers on the memorial that now stands on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.


Railroad hyperbole echoes all the way down to the dot-com frenzy
Stanford historian Richard White said he began his book, Railroaded: The Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern America, 12 years ago knowing only that he wanted to write something about the American West and railroads. He was unprepared for what he found in the archives.


Health insurance no guarantee for diabetes care in developing countries, Stanford researchers find
With little chance of complete diabetes prevention, programs and policies must be established to care for those who develop the disease. If not, illnesses will increase along with the costs of care.


Stanford University names Wiley Hausam managing director of Bing Concert Hall


Stanford expert discusses North Korea's new leadership
Since Kim Jong Il's death, North Korea has a young new leader: Kim's 28-year-old son Kim Jong Un. David Straub, who attended the seventh U.S.-Korea West Coast Strategic Forum in Seoul just days before Kim’s death, shares highlights from the forum and offers insight into the current North Korea situation.


Students go deep into the Grand Canyon to examine the river that waters the West
Twelve sophomores spent two weeks rafting through the Grand Canyon, immersed in the issue that will determine the future of the West: Is there enough water to go around?


Stanford symposium, exhibits, talk by Gloria Steinem commemorate Ms. magazine's 40 years
Stanford University will mark the 40th anniversary of Ms. magazine with a winter quarter series of events titled "Ms. at 40 and the Future of Feminism." The keynote address, on Jan. 26, will be delivered by founding editor Gloria Steinem.


Stanford University symposium, exhibits, talk by Gloria Steinem commemorate Ms. magazine's 40 years


Archaeologist questions role of human rights in site preservation
Ian Hodder, Stanford professor of anthropology, digs through the politics of protecting cultural heritage.


Stanford helps digitize papers of Europe's first female professor
Stanford University Libraries helps to digitize the papers of Laura Bassi, a noted 18th-century Italian scientist.


The unexpected: Cancer during pregnancy
Battling cancer is risky for anyone, but when the patient is also a mom-to-be, doctors face a host of unanswered questions.


Annual Report: Becoming of greater service to the public
The university Annual Report for 2011 is now available online. In it, President John Hennessy and Leslie Hume, chair of the Board of Trustees, share the successes and challenges of the past year as they look to the university's lasting legacy.


Stanford political scientist maps militant groups around the globe
Researcher Martha Crenshaw is building a searchable, online map in an attempt to overcome one of the biggest challenges to tackling terrorism: understanding the motivations, allegiances, shifting priorities and organizational structures of the world's militant groups.


Papers of Europe's first female professor to become available online, with help from Stanford's libraries
Laura Bassi, a noted 18th-century Italian scientist and Europe's first female professor, left behind 6,000 pages of intriguing documents that describe her life and work. Stanford's libraries  have teamed up with the Bologna library to scan Bassi's archives and make them easily accessible online later this year.


Stanford archaeologist questions the role of human rights in site preservation
The growing movement within archaeological circles to define historic sites by their links to the human rights of the indigenous populations may ignore the political and cultural realities in the region, Professor Ian Hodder says.


Stanford physicist's moderate approach to climate change gaining supporters
Stanford physicist's prescriptions include more natural gas and nuclear power, doubts about renewable energy goals, and a new way to gain political support.


Stanford engineers boost electrical efficiency in organic semiconductors
By packing molecules closer together, chemical engineers have dramatically improved the electrical conductivity of organic semiconductors. The advance could herald flexible electronics, more efficient solar panels, and perhaps better TV screens.


Stanford expert discusses Kim Jong Il's death and what's next for North Korea
As the world reacts to the death of Kim Jong Il, Stanford’s Gi-Wook Shin talks about the transition of power in North Korea,  relations between Pyongyang and Washington, and perhaps Kim’s most troubling legacy: his nuclear weapons program.


Stanford withdraws its bid for a NYC campus
Stanford University has withdrawn its application to the city of New York to construct an applied sciences and engineering campus on Roosevelt Island.


Stanford reports FY 2011 financial results


Robert Osserman, noted Stanford mathematician, dies at 84
In addition to his important research, Bob Osserman brought math to a broad audience through public conversations with comedian Steve Martin, among others.


Trustees approve building projects and a campus energy plan
At its Dec. 12-13 meeting, the Stanford University Board of Trustees took action on nine construction projects and approved a $438 million plan to improve the campus energy system. Trustees toured the Anderson Collection and the William H. Neukom Building at Stanford Law School and heard a presentation on Occupy Stanford.


Report of the president: Academic Council Professoriate appointments
The Academic Council Professoriate appointments, promotions, and reappointments for the periods indicated were reviewed by the Advisory Board of the Academic Council on May 18, May 25, June 8, June 15, June 22, June 29, July 13, July 27, August 10, and August 30, 2011, and were approved by the president.


Planting trees may save Costa Rican birds threatened by intensive farming
A 10-year walking census of Costa Rican birds proves that intensive farming and birds don't mix, which may be bad for both farmers and birds. But often there is a solution: planting trees.


Stanford's Board of Trustees approves sites for two new arts buildings
Stanford's Board of Trustees has approved sites for two new buildings: the McMurtry Building for the Department of Art & Art History and the museum building for the Anderson Collection at Stanford University. The buildings will be critical to expanding and enhancing the role the arts play throughout campus.


Stanford researchers find that pension funds for California state workers are still in peril - action needed now


Study of comic books helps Stanford scholars identify cultural trends
Stanford's Graphic Narrative Project takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying this dynamic art form.


Stanford scientists' computer models help predict tsunami risk
Stanford scientists are using complex computational models to solve the puzzle of the devastating tsunami that struck Japan earlier this year and predict where future tsunamis might occur.


Tobacco industry dying? Not so fast, says Stanford expert
Smoking is not going away. Worldwide, says Stanford historian Robert Proctor, the tobacco industry continues to create toxic products that cause not just lung cancer but also maladies such as cataracts, ankle fractures, early onset menopause, spontaneous abortion and erectile dysfunction.


Stanford offers its own take on the Occupy movement
On Friday afternoon, students and faculty held Occupy the Future, an event that included teach-ins and a rally on White Plaza.  Participants were encouraged to protect the environment, fight corporate influence on politics and help their fellow students at the University of California.


Chemically scrubbing CO2 from the air too expensive, says Stanford researcher who offers an alternative plan
To lessen the severity of global warming, focus on controls for coal-burning power plants, researchers say.


Rosemary Knight: Geophysicist, senate chair, hitchhiking advocate
Geophysics Professor Rosemary Knight, this year's Faculty Senate chair, was born in Wales and grew up in Pittsburgh and Ontario, Canada. During the school year, she commutes to an island in British Columbia, where she lives with her geologist husband. During the summer, she promotes hitchhiking on the island, home to about 3,500 people.


Stanford researchers: Mapping underground water sources for drip irrigation could transform African village life
Investments in small-scale irrigation and geophysical mapping will help relieve food insecurity in sub-Saharan Africa, Stanford researchers say.


Stanford scientists subject rocks to hellish conditions to combat global warming
By exposing a handful of rocks to high temperatures and pressures, the scientists have obtained critical data about large-scale underground storage of carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas and leading cause of global warming.


New year, new names for Stanford retirement plans
The merger of Stanford's retirement plans will take place without any action required by participating employees. Employee contributions will continue to go into the same investment options they have selected. The merged plan will function the same as each separate plan does today.


China's economic stability depends on more education, Stanford economist says
Without teaching more kids the skills needed to support higher wages, China runs the risk of never making it as a rich nation. The economic and social forecasts and prescriptions for the country’s sustainable growth are being explored by FSI's Scott Rozelle and his colleagues.


Student Affairs adds new Office of Alcohol Policy and Education
Stanford recently opened a new Office of Alcohol Policy and Education under the direction of Ralph Castro, associate dean of student affairs. Castro answers questions about the mission of the new office, located in Rogers House, and about a new student alcohol policy.


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