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CLAREMONT MCKENNA COLLEGE INFORMATION


Claremont McKenna College is located in Claremont, California and is a private college. Claremont McKenna College is a four year college and offers Bachelor's Degrees, and a number of different programs and courses.

Claremont McKenna College is in a relatively urban area (in or near a city), which may be something you prefer if you like a city lifestyle as a student.

Claremont McKenna College does not have a rolling admission policy, and you will want to make sure that you get your application in before January 2.

Claremont McKenna College is relatively smaller in size with an enrollment of only 1,140 students.

Claremont McKenna College accepts about 28% of its applicants on average, and 72% of the students receive some sort of financial aid for college at Claremont McKenna College.

If you are looking for more information on financial aid at Claremont McKenna College, you can may want to contact Georgette DeVeres, who is the Dean of Financial Aid at Claremont McKenna College. You may also qualify for free grants for college in California to attend Claremont McKenna College.

You may also need to take one or more of the following tests to qualify for admission at Claremont McKenna College:

  • ACT
  • SAT

If you are interested in joining the Army, Claremont McKenna College does have an ROTC Army program that is available for attending students.

If you are interested in joining the Air Force, Claremont McKenna College does have an ROTC Air Force program that is available for attending students.

Claremont McKenna College offers the following extracurricular activities to its students:

  • Choral Groups
  • Concert Band
  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Jazz Band
  • Literary Magazine
  • Music Ensembles
  • Music Theater
  • Pep Band
  • Radio Station
  • Sports
  • Student Film
  • Yearbook

You may want to brush up on your ACT preparation as well, because the average ACT score for students that are entering Claremont McKenna College is 30.

Don't forget to study for the SAT, because the average SAT score for students that are entering Claremont McKenna College is 1390.

Do a lot of students come from out of state to attend Claremont McKenna College? Well, about 56% of the student body at Claremont McKenna College comes from outside the state of California.

QUICK FACTS ABOUT CLAREMONT MCKENNA COLLEGE

Claremont McKenna College Address:


500 E. 9th Street
Claremont, California 91711
Phone: 909-621-8088
Fax: 909-621-8516
Web Site: http://www.claremontmckenna.edu

Claremont McKenna College admission closing date:


January 2

Does Claremont McKenna College offer Associate's degrees?


No

Does Claremont McKenna College offer Bachelor's degrees?


Yes

Does Claremont McKenna College offer Master's degrees?


No

Does Claremont McKenna College offer Doctoral degrees?


No

Claremont McKenna College graduation rate:


84%

Claremont McKenna College average ACT score:


30

Claremont McKenna College average SAT score:


1390

Claremont McKenna College tuition cost (estimate):


$33,210



Financial Aid is available only to those who qualify.

Claremont McKenna College room & board cost (estimate):


$9,180

Is Claremont McKenna College a private college?


Yes

Is Claremont McKenna College a coed college?


Yes

Claremont McKenna College school calendar:


Semester

Is Claremont McKenna College a 2 year or 4 year college?


4 Years
Please Note: Length of programs pertain to finishing programs in normal time.

Claremont McKenna College enrollment:


1,140 Students

Percentage of applicants accepted to Claremont McKenna College


28%

Percentage of students at Claremont McKenna College receiving financial aid:


72%

Percentage of African American students:


4%



Percentage of Asian students:


15%

Percentage of Hispanic students:


9%

Percentage of Caucasian students:


63%







Other Activities Nearby:


Golf Courses in Claremont


Data provided by Data-lists.com Universities and Colleges Database. Data last updated on 2007-10-10.

CLAREMONT MCKENNA COLLEGE IN CALIFORNIA GRANTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION

Federal Pell Grants

Academic Competitiveness (AC) Grant Program

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Program

Grants and Scholarships available in California

CLAREMONT MCKENNA COLLEGE NEWS

CMC celebrates 70th Commencement with the Class of 2017
Seventy is a nice, solid round number and will be forever memorable to the Claremont McKenna College Class of 2017 as Saturday, May 13 – a beautiful spring day – marked the College’s 70th annual Commencement ceremony. Graduates convened on Pritzlaff Field to prelude music from the Artisan Brass Quintet. Many seemed to have a quiet glow about them; one that comes from knowing four years of hard, rewarding work is over and the next exciting phase of their lives is about to begin.


NCAA Championships continue for spring sports
The regular-season and conference championships are in the books for Claremont-Mudd-Scripps’ spring sports teams. Seven spring sports teams (women’s golf, men’s golf, men’s tennis, women’s tennis, women’s lacrosse, men’s track & field, women’s track & field) made the NCAA Championships this year. Complete NCAA Championships details for each team are below.


Three CMS spring teams to host NCAA regionals, seven make NCAAs
The regular-season and conference championships are in the books for Claremont-Mudd-Scripps’ spring sports teams. For the seven spring sports teams that won Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) championships this spring (women’s golf, men’s golf, men’s tennis, women’s tennis, women’s lacrosse, men’s track & field, women’s track & field), their seasons continue with the NCAA Division III Championships.


National Champions: Claremont Lions men’s rugby wins championship
In the team’s second-straight title match appearance, the Claremont Lions men’s rugby club this year won it all, and captured the National Small College Rugby Organization (NSCRO) national championship. Claremont played a virtually flawless championship match to defeat Tufts (Mass.) University, 65-0, on Sunday, April 30, at Infinity Park in Glendale, Colo. It is the second national championship for the Claremont Lions men’s rugby club this decade, after a Division II national championship in 2010.


Camp Pendleton weekend provides valuable leadership training for CMC’s ROTC cadets
Twice a year cadets from Claremont McKenna’s Army ROTC program travel down to Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton for three days of training. The training occurs once in the fall and again in the spring, most recently from April 7-9. Camp Pendleton is a little less than an hour north of San Diego. The base’s footprint stretches from San Clemente to the north, Oceanside to the south, Interstate 15 to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west.


CMC joins national alliance to expand access, opportunity for low and moderate income students
Claremont McKenna College is helping to lead the national effort to address disparity in access to higher education by joining 67 of the nation’s most respected colleges and universities in a new alliance dedicated to expanding opportunities for highly talented, lower-income students.


Final Four awaits Claremont men’s rugby
The Claremont Lions men’s rugby team has advanced to the National Small College Rugby Organization (NSCRO) Final Four, and plays Xavier University (Ohio) in the national semifinal on Saturday, April 29 at 2 p.m. (MST) in Glendale, Colo. at Infinity Park. Matches throughout the weekend can be watched live. In the other half of the bracket, Tufts University (Mass.) takes on LSU Alexandria. The two semifinal winners play for the national championship on Sunday, April 30 at 1 p.m. (MST).  


Live performances to entertain and dazzle at #CMCAlumniWeekend
By Amanda Kandasamy ’20 This weekend, Claremont McKenna College celebrates Alumni Weekend not only by playing host to alumni and guests, but also by featuring a number of performing artists set to entertain and dazzle attendees throughout the weekend. Recording artists Meaghan Maples, Spirit of Oya, DJ JiJi Sweet, and Sheldon and Cunnane, will all perform live over the course of the three days, and magician Magic Grimm is set to wow the crowd at Monte Carlo.


Live performances to entertain and dazzle at #CMCAlumniWeekend, April 21-23
By Amanda Kandasamy ’20 This weekend, Claremont McKenna College celebrates Alumni Weekend not only by playing host to alumni and guests, but also by featuring a number of performing artists set to entertain and dazzle attendees throughout the weekend. Recording artists Meaghan Maples, Spirit of Oya, DJ JiJi Sweet, and Sheldon and Cunnane, will all perform live over the course of the three days, and magician Magic Grimm is set to wow the crowd at Monte Carlo.


Inaugural health services networking trip to Chicago introduces students to a growing industry
Over spring break, 16 students traveled to Chicago to take part in the first-ever health services and sciences-focused networking trip to the Windy City, led by the Soll Center for Student Opportunity at Claremont McKenna College. The week in Chicago (March 12-17) was filled with excellent learning and networking opportunities for students at host workplaces. Host organizations ranged from traditional hospitals, to research facilities and science incubators.


Alumni Weekend 2017
Come Home CMC! This year’s Claremont McKenna Alumni Weekend will be held on April 21-23, 2017. Alumni Weekend is an exciting few days to reconnect with your fellow alum, professors, and students.


Alumni Weekend 2017 is right around the corner
Final preparations are being made for Claremont McKenna College Alumni Weekend 2017. This year #CMCAlumniWeekend takes place from April 21-23, and there is still time for you and your classmates to register for the festivities. Registration closes at 8:00 am Monday, April 17.


Claremont Men’s Rugby to host PacWest Cup on CMC campus
The Claremont Colleges Lions men’s rugby club team is hosting the PacWest Cup playoffs on Claremont McKenna College’s Parents Field from April 8-9. Claremont takes on the University of Dallas in one PacWest Cup semifinal match on April 8 at 1 p.m., while Cal Maritime Academy and Angelo State (Texas) face off in the other semifinal match on April 8 at 11 a.m.


Ulysses J. Sofia Named Dean of Keck Science Department
The Keck Science Department's new Dean was announced on April 6. Here is the text of the announcement:    On behalf of the Presidents of Claremont McKenna, Pitzer, and Scripps Colleges, we are pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Ulysses J. (UJ) Sofia as the new dean of the Keck Science Department.  His appointment will begin July 1, 2017 and he will hold the title of Weinberg Family Dean of the Keck Science Department. 


A message from President Chodosh on Heather Mac Donald’s Athenaeum talk
Dear CMC Community: As you know, in a coordinated attempt to shut down Heather Mac Donald’s lecture last night, a large group of students from the Claremont Colleges, including a small number of CMC students and some individuals from external communities, gathered to protest and blocked guests from entering the Athenaeum.


Claremont Men’s Rugby to host PacWest Cup on CMC's campus
The Claremont Colleges Lions men’s rugby club team is hosting the PacWest Cup playoffs on Claremont McKenna College’s Parents Field from April 8-9. Claremont takes on the University of Dallas in one PacWest Cup semifinal match on April 8 at 1 p.m., while Cal Maritime Academy and Angelo State (Texas) face off in the other semifinal match on April 8 at 11 a.m.


Yale Law Journal article is prime example of CMC professor-student teamwork
Daniel Krauss, a professor of psychology at Claremont McKenna College, has co-authored an article titled “Capital Jurors in an Era of Death Penalty Decline” in the latest edition of The Yale Law Journal.


McKennaMUN V conference provides valuable leadership experience for CMC students
For two days (April 8-9) all across campus, Claremont McKenna College and the CMC Model United Nations (CMCMUN) student organization will host nearly 600 high school students for the annual McKennaMUN V conference. During the conference, through discussion and debate, visiting high school delegates are exposed to critical global diplomacy topics such as cyberwar, refugee rights, and global pandemics. Under the guidance of the McKennaMUN staff, delegates hone their writing, negotiating, and public speaking skills.


Entrepreneurs ‘Wiivv’ CMC education and connections into successful startup
An internship at Hewlett-Packard working in 3D printing with friend and Claremont McKenna College alumnus Shamil Hargovan ’10 never materialized like Louis-Victor (LV) Jadavji ’15 had originally hoped when he completed the Silicon Valley Program. However, three months after Jadavji began an excellent job elsewhere, the two friends sat in a café and had a conversation that dramatically changed the path of their careers.


CMC hosts conference on “Homeland Security at the Local Level”
Claremont McKenna College is hosting “Homeland Security at the Local Level,” a conference on the role local governments play in the fight against terrorism. The half-day event is Friday, March 24, from 8 a.m. – noon at McKenna Auditorium at Claremont McKenna College (CMC).


Life changing-decision: Why five in the Class of ’21 picked CMC
Another type of March Madness is underway for soon-to-be college students across the country…college acceptance and decision season. Choosing a college is a life-changing, exciting moment in the lives of many high school students.


CMC chemistry Prof. Anna Wenzel receives mentorship grant to support undergraduate research
Anna Wenzel, associate professor of chemistry at Claremont McKenna College and chair of the chemistry division in the Keck Science Department, has received a prestigious grant to provide mentorship this summer that will support the ongoing research of Ellen Berkley ’18.


CMC to host conference on “Homeland Security at the Local Level” on Friday
Claremont McKenna College is hosting “Homeland Security at the Local Level,” a conference on the role local governments play in the fight against terrorism. The half-day event is Friday, March 24, from 8 a.m. – noon at McKenna Auditorium at Claremont McKenna College (CMC).


Winter teams excel at NCAAs for CMS
All four of CMS’ winter sports teams (women’s basketball, women’s swimming & diving, men’s swimming & diving and men’s basketball) had a tremendous amount of success this season. Combined, the Athenas and Stags won four SCIAC championships, and two SCIAC Tournament titles. Every winter team this year represented CMS at its respective NCAA Division III Championships in March. Below is an update on each team's results at the NCAA Championships. Swimming & Diving


Wes Moore, best-selling author, veteran, and Rhodes Scholar to deliver 2017 CMC Commencement address
Claremont McKenna College announced today that Wes Moore, a decorated Army combat veteran, Rhodes Scholar, best-selling author, and CEO of BridgeEdU, a national initiative focused on closing gaps in college completion and career opportunities, will be CMC’s 2017 Commencement speaker. The ceremony will take place on Saturday, May 13, at Claremont McKenna College and will mark the 70th CMC Commencement.


Prof. Stacey Doan to deliver presentation on childhood stress at international conference in Spain
Claremont McKenna College Assistant Professor of Psychology Stacey Doan will deliver a presentation at the American Psychosomatic Society’s 75th annual meeting to be held March 15-18 in Sevilla, Spain.


Henri Cole to be inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters
Henri Cole, Professor of Literature at CMC and author of nine collections of poetry, including Middle Earth, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, will be inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters during its annual ceremony in May.


CMC’s Model UN team continues its winning streak
The championships just keep piling up. CMC's Model UN team won Best Delegation for their size division at the Harvard National Model United Nations (HNMUN) Conference held Feb. 16-19 in Boston. CMC Model UN Teams also won top laurels two years in a row (2015-16) in that same division at Harvard’s World Model UN Conference. The CMC team will try for a “three-peat” at the next World Model UN March 13-17 in Montreal.


Winter teams make NCAAs
All four of CMS’ winter sports teams (women’s basketball, women’s swimming & diving, men’s swimming & diving and men’s basketball) have had a tremendous amount of success this season. Combined, the Athenas and Stags won four SCIAC championships, and two (out of two) SCIAC Tournament titles. Every winter team this year is representing CMS at its respective NCAA Division III Championships in March. Swimming & Diving


NCAA Championships up next for CMS’ four winter sports teams
All four of CMS’ winter sports teams (women’s basketball, women’s swimming & diving, men’s swimming & diving and men’s basketball) have had a tremendous amount of success this season. Combined, the Athenas and Stags won four SCIAC championships, and two (out of two) SCIAC Tournament titles. Every winter team this year is representing CMS at its respective NCAA Division III Championships in March.


New Soll Center for Student Opportunity makes its debut
For Claremont McKenna College alumnus Bruce Soll ’79 P’12, P’15, P’17, “CMC was the land of opportunity.” Over the years, CMC has continued to strengthen opportunities for students, most recently with the Soll Center for Student Opportunity now available as a resource for students' personal and professional development  


Early career research awards given to CMC psychology professor Stacey Doan
Claremont McKenna College Assistant Professor of Psychology Stacey N. Doan has been selected for two prominent early career research awards. She received the Western Psychological Association (WPA) Early Career Research Award, and a similar award from the Society for Research in Child Development Asian Caucus.


CMS to host inaugural Health and Wellness Fair on March 23 in Roberts Pavilion
Locally in the Claremont community, there is a plethora of health and wellness opportunities available. Organizers of the inaugural Claremont-Mudd-Scripps (CMS) Health and Wellness Fair aim to bring together students, faculty, and staff from the CMS colleges for a one-day event to showcase as many local health and wellness resources as possible under one roof. The health fair is scheduled from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday, March 23 in Roberts Pavilion on the Claremont McKenna College campus.


CMC Professors Diana Selig and Wei-Chin Hwang to receive 7C faculty diversity awards
Claremont McKenna College faculty members Diana Selig and Wei-Chin Hwang have been chosen as two of the Claremont Colleges Faculty Diversity award winners. The Claremont Colleges Diversity Working Group is presenting the awards to Selig, Hwang and Jean Reith Schroedel of Claremont Graduate University on Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 3:30 p.m. in Balch Auditorium on the Scripps campus. A reception will follow and no RSVP is required.


Ellsworth Kelly art sculpture installed on campus
A 40-foot, white-painted stainless steel totem by famed artist Ellsworth Kelly will be installed on February 15 within the small grove of trees that stands between Appleby and Phillips Halls and Collins Dining Hall — the former site of the historic Story House. This sculpture, along with another artwork by Chris Burden that was installed in May next to Roberts Pavilion, was made possible through a gift by the George Roberts Family ’66 P’93. Mr.


Sheena Hui ’20 plays in Metropolitan International Piano Competition
One of the many benefits for students attending Claremont McKenna College is having the ability to take classes at the other Claremont Colleges. For Sheena Hui ’20, a 3/2 management and engineering major at CMC, and music and piano performance major at Scripps College, taking classes at the two colleges has been emotionally and intellectually fulfilling.


CMS student-athletes take part in NCAA-wide training on substance abuse prevention
In an effort to increase student awareness on campus regarding substance abuse prevention and health promotion, five individuals (three current students and two administrators) represented Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Athletics at the APPLE Institute from Jan. 20-22 in Nashville, Tenn.


Installation of Ellsworth Kelly art sculpture scheduled for today
A 40-foot, white-painted stainless steel totem by famed artist Ellsworth Kelly will be installed on February 15 within the small grove of trees that stands between Appleby and Phillips Halls and Collins Dining Hall — the former site of the historic Story House. This sculpture, along with another artwork by Chris Burden that was installed in May next to Roberts Pavilion, was made possible through a gift by the George Roberts Family ’66 P’93. Mr.


Installation of Ellsworth Kelly art sculpture scheduled for Wednesday
A 40-foot, white-painted stainless steel totem by famed artist Ellsworth Kelly will be installed on February 15 within the small grove of trees that stands between Appleby and Phillips Halls and Collins Dining Hall — the former site of the historic Story House. This sculpture, along with another artwork by Chris Burden that was installed in May next to Roberts Pavilion, was made possible through a gift by the George Roberts Family ’66 P’93. Mr.


Installation on Campus of Ellsworth Kelly Totem Nears Completion
A 40-foot, white-painted stainless steel totem by famed artist Ellsworth Kelly will be installed on February 15 within the small grove of trees that stands between Appleby and Phillips Halls and Collins Dining Hall — the former site of the historic Story House. This sculpture, along with another artwork by Chris Burden that was installed in May next to Roberts Pavilion, was made possible through a gift by the George Roberts Family ’66 P’93. Mr.


Published work of CMC’s Philosophy Department recognized
At the Inaugural Community Celebration of CMC Faculty Publications and Grants, to be held on Feb. 10 at McKenna Auditorium, the Philosophy Department will recognize the stellar work of six of its faculty on numerous publications and two external grants received in 2016.


Depolarizing Legal Conflict
The following essay by President Hiram E. Chodosh is reprinted from the January 2017 Maadhyam, Council for Mediation and Conflict Resolution newsletter.


Need a specialized microscope that doesn't yet exist? Ask a CMC student
By Hope Hamashige


Lindsay Burton ’19 explores the history of women in CMC’s ROTC
By Lindsay Burton ’19


President Chodosh moderates key panel on mediation, conflict, and the law in India
President Hiram E. Chodosh delivered introductory remarks and moderated a panel of Indian dignitaries at the inaugural event for Maadhyam, Council for Mediation and Conflict Resolution. The panel discussion, held January 7 at the India International Centre in New Delhi, was attended by over 300 people and focused on “Conflict and the Law: Perspectives and Challenges.” Maadhyam also published a brief essay, Depolarizing Legal Conflict by President Chodosh in its inaugural newsletter.


Prestigious grant awarded to Professor Venit-Shelton by ACLS
Tamara Venit-Shelton, an associate professor of history at Claremont McKenna College and author of A Squatter’s Republic: Land and the Politics of Monopoly in California, 1850-1900, has been awarded the Frederick Burkhardt Fellowship for Recently Tenured Scholars by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS).


CMC celebrates faculty publications and grants
Claremont McKenna College packs a punch when it comes to faculty scholarship. So as a way of celebrating its distinguished faculty and their brilliant work, CMC is hosting its Inaugural Community Celebration of Faculty Publications and Grants on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017 from 2:30-4:30 p.m. at McKenna Auditorium on campus. More than 100 professors from 10 different departments are expected to have their work on display from publications and grants awarded in 2016.


Health Services and Science-focused networking trip to visit Chicago for the first time
The Student Opportunity Center at Claremont McKenna College has planned its first-ever Health Services and Sciences-focused networking trip to Chicago, an up-and-coming area in the industry.


Weather pushes Cornell Brooks Athenaeum event to Tuesday at lunch
Unfortunately, due to extreme weather back east, the Athenaeum talk scheduled for Monday night with Mr. Cornell Brooks, president and CEO of the NAACP,  has been rescheduled as a lunch time talk for Tuesday, January 24, with a reception at 11:30 am, lunch at 11:45 am, and the talk at 12:15 pm.


Early Decision applicants among first to be enrolled in the CMC Class of 2021
In the next few weeks, high school seniors contemplating which college or university to attend next fall will have some exciting decisions to make. And for a select group of outstanding seniors who will be matriculating at CMC and make up the Class of 2021, it was a decision best made early. According to Jennifer Sandoval-Dancs, Assistant Vice President and Director of Admission at CMC, the College offered admission to 155 first-year students during Early Decision I (the first application period, which had a deadline of Nov. 1) and no doubt that was a load off their minds.


‘Neo-origami’ sculpture by Lawrence Beall ’16 part of flourishing CMC art scene
With the installation of Chris Burden’s Meet in the Middle sculpture to the annual Student Art Showcase to the visual pieces on display in the dorms, administrative buildings, and the Athenaeum, works of art can be found in spaces throughout campus.


Professor Glen Cooper brings expertise in late antique Middle Eastern, European studies to CMC
Glen M. Cooper, a visiting assistant professor at CMC, is a historian with a broad swath of knowledge that covers many eras and cultures. Cooper came to the College from Brigham Young University in 2014 and has taught subjects that range from ancient Greek history to Islamic history to medieval Europe and even extending to India and Byzantium.


Meet an Alumna: Goldman Sachs analyst Rachel Doehr ’16
As part of our ongoing series on alumni who are building on their CMC education and opportunities to do great things, meet Rachel Doehr ’16 who leveraged her work with the Financial Economic Institute, Lowe Institute and Robert Day School faculty to get a plum position with the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, and now is an analyst at Goldman Sachs. What are you doing currently with Goldman Sachs?


Prof. Gary Hamburg awarded Marc Raeff Prize for seminal work on 18th-century Russia
UPDATE 12/16: Read the Foreign Affairs review of Russia's Path Toward Enlightenment. The Marc Raeff Book Prize has been awarded to Gary M. Hamburg, Otho M. Behr Professor of the History of Ideas at CMC, for his book Russia’s Path toward Enlightenment: Faith, Politics, and Reason, 1500-1801.


Becky Chung ’20 serves as U.S. youth delegate at U.N. climate change conference
Given how far she’s come, it’s hard to believe that Becky Chung ’20 didn’t make the Model UN team as a high school freshman. But it’s there, in black and white, in the journal Chung has faithfully kept for years: I was rejected today for the Model UN. “I thought to myself, ‘You can reject me now, but I’m going to go much farther and effect actual change,’” Chung said. “It’s funny to think about that now that I’ve done work with the UN.


Bill and Nancy Arce: The First Family of CMS Athletics
The Arce family name is indelibly stamped on the Claremont McKenna College and Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Athletics communities. Arce Field. The William B. Arce Scholarship Fund and the William B. Arce Professorship at CMC. The William B. & Nancy T. Arce Hall of Excellence in Roberts Pavilion. The legacy of the First Family and Father and Mother of Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Athletics lives on through the coaches, student-athletes, and staff members at CMS and CMC.


Meet an Alum: Goldman Sachs analyst Rachel Doehr '16
As part of our ongoing series on alumni who are building on their CMC education and opportunities to do great things, meet Rachel Doehr ’16 who leveraged her work with the Financial Economic Institute, Lowe Institute and Robert Day School faculty to get a plum position with the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, and now is an analyst at Goldman Sachs. 


CIE makes the dorm room a startup incubator
CMC’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CIE) is making sure that students with great ideas get a taste of what it’s like to run a startup. The CIE’s new program, the Startup Award, allows students to apply for funding to take their startup idea from paper-napkin stage to real working business, said Aman Raghuvanshi ’18, who heads up venture development as a student associate at CIE. “We’ll work with applicants to set milestones, which we then translate into accountable goals.”


CMC is a ‘centering’ experience for Claire Donnelly ’17
Claire Donnelly ’17 stands head and shoulders above most of the rest of her class at CMC – literally. At 6 feet tall, Donnelly has played center for the CMS Athenas women's basketball team since her freshman year at CMC. The Athenas have won the conference championship and played in the postseason three years in a row. Last year, Donnelly led the conference in blocked shots and the team in field-goal percentage. What’s more, she comes by that talent naturally.


Alumna Jane Chang Mi ’01 had a unique role at National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day
Seventy-five years after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the world once again turned its eyes to events happening in the Pacific. Thousands gathered on Dec. 7, 2016, at the site of the infamous attack for National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day and the 75th anniversary of the tragic events that propelled the United States into World War II and drastically altered the lives of millions.


Professor Robert Faggen authored recently published book The Neon Mary Weatherford Paintings
Robert Faggen, the Barton Evans and H. Andrea Neves Professor of Literature and Director of the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies authored The Neon Mary Weatherford Paintings, a recently published illustrated book of Weatherford’s abstract paintings and neon work.


A Future So Bright
The Student Opportunity Center has released some remarkable numbers showing that CMCers are taking advantage of opportunities before and after graduation.


Ian O’Grady ’15 awarded Marshall Scholarship to study in UK
Ian O’Grady ’15 has accepted a prestigious Marshall Scholarship to study in the United Kingdom. O’Grady will become CMC’s sixth Marshall Scholar and first since 1994, adding to a distinguished legacy of prestigious international scholarships granted to CMCers.


Visiting scholars provide global perspective for CMC students and faculty
Educating its students to live thoughtful and productive lives as responsible leaders on a global scale constitutes a major principle of Claremont McKenna College’s mission. By bringing internationally renowned scholars to campus, CMC’s Visiting Scholars Program offers students an avenue for attaining a global education, right here in Claremont.


David Dreier ’75 discusses the incoming Trump administration on KNBC
Trustee and former Rep. David Dreier ’75 was interviewed by KNBC on Nov. 21. Dreier, who chairs the Dreier Roundtable at CMC, was a member of Congress for 32 years and once chaired the powerful Ways and Means Committee. See links to the two interviews below: NBC4's Conan Nolan asks Dreier about President-elect Donald Trump and immigration, healthcare… and Arnold Schwarzenegger?


Four Athena and Stag greats inducted as newest members of CMS Hall of Fame
Teammates, friends, family, coaches, Hall of Fame members, and numerous others from the three-college Claremont McKenna-Harvey Mudd-Scripps Colleges community turned out in force for the CMS Alumni Association Athletics Hall of Fame Banquet and Induction Ceremony, to celebrate the addition of four new members. The ceremony is available to watch in full. 


VISA lunches provide insight and background on CMC faculty and staff members
College campuses are vibrant, diverse communities with a wide range of faculty and staff members who have varied backgrounds and bring different skill sets, life stories, passions and experiences to their work. In an effort to foster an even greater sense of community at Claremont McKenna College, the Dean of the Faculty’s Office has been hosting VISA (values, identities, scholarship, arts) lunches a few times per semester at the CARE Center.


NCAA postseason competition looms for four CMS fall teams
Four of the seven Claremont-Mudd-Scripps fall sports teams have advanced to NCAA postseason competition. Volleyball, women’s soccer, men’s cross country and women’s cross country have extended their seasons. Cross Country


CMC hosts Lessons and Legacies XIV Holocaust scholars conference
This past weekend, some 275 Holocaust scholars and survivors from around the world gathered in Claremont for the biennial Lessons and Legacies XIV, the largest conference of experts on the Holocaust. Hosted by Claremont McKenna College and CMC’s Mgrublian Center for Human Rights, the program ran from November 3-6. This marked the second time CMC has hosted the conference in its history.


CMC ROTC wins top honors in regional fitness, military skills contest
CMC's Army ROTC program won first place in the Task Force South Ranger Challenge Competition last weekend in San Diego. The Ranger Challenge, a grueling event started in 1982 to crown the best two-person “buddy” team of Rangers at Fort Benning, Ga., has evolved into a nation-wide competition and is often referred to as Army ROTC's varsity sport.


U.S. Department of Justice Awards $749,998 to the EmPOWER Center
The Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women recently announced The Claremont Colleges will receive a $749,998 grant to help students who are victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. The DOJ award will strengthen existing resources and fund new programming and supportive services delivered by the EmPOWER Center, established in 2015.


Communicating across differences: CARE Center is a resource for all
From the moment the Claremont McKenna College CARE (civility, access, resources, and expression) Center began operation with an open house on August 30, students, faculty, and staff have been utilizing the Center’s offerings. The CARE Center, located on the second floor of the Heggblade Center, aims to strengthen community on campus with services and programs focused on education about identity and communicating across difference.


CMC Psychology Professor Cathy Reed to share $600,000 National Science Foundation grant
Cathy Reed, the McElwee Family Professor of Psychology and George R. Roberts Fellow Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, will share a $600,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to improve the teaching of cognitive neuroscience at undergraduate institutions. Reed will share the money with two colleagues from the University of Richmond and Hampshire College.


U.S. Secretary of Education meets with CMC student leaders to discuss fight against sexual assault
U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. met with Claremont McKenna College student leaders on Tuesday, Oct. 11, to discuss efforts the CMC community is taking to prevent violence and sexual assault.


Prof. Minxin Pei's book about crony capitalism in China reviewed in The Economist
Prof. Minxin Pei's new book, China’s Crony Capitalism: The Dynamics of Regime Decay (Harvard University Press) received a positive review in The Economist.


Opportunity knocks for CMCers at new student center
The benefits of a CMC education play out in many ways and are often extended over many decades after CMCers leave campus. But as graduation looms, thoughts turn to jobs, career paths, and the urgency of the “real world.”


Professor Riggio’s four-decade long leadership study gets Kellogg Foundation Grant
Ronald Riggio, Henry R. Kravis Professor of Leadership and Organizational Psychology at CMC, continues to build upon a research project that provides invaluable insight into long-term linkages between early childhood development, leadership, and success. The research project, “Early Life Predictors of Adult Success,” is supported by a $50,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.


Fulbright award boosts Prof. Aseema Sinha’s research on India-U.S. linkages
Government Prof. Aseema Sinha's research on the intersection between India and the United States received a significant boost this year when it received a Fulbright award. The Fulbright-Nehru Academic and Professional Excellence Award will support Professor Sinha's research into the roles non-state actors such as business people, students, diaspora communities, and others play in two “estranged democracies” becoming strategic partners.


Prof. Frederick R. Lynch quoted in Huffington Post story about AARP’s ‘scary’ Social Security ads
The Huffington Post reports that an AARP campaign about Social Security is upsetting liberal retirement security advocates “because it focused on getting politicians to propose any detailed plan ? and didn’t distinguish between reform proposals that would cut benefits and those that would not.”


Bryn Miller ’19 interviews journalist George Vecsey about U.S.-China relations in the Olympics
Journalist George Vecsey, a former New York Times sports columnist, has covered all the Summer Olympic games from Los Angeles in 1984 to Bejing in 2008, making him an excellent source for insight about the relationship between U.S. athletes and those from rising power China.


Economic forecast: Inland Empire economy is growing but long-term challenges remain
The Inland Empire continues to grow economically with no recession predicted for at least the next two years, according to data presented at the Southern California Economic Conference this week at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario.


Psychology Today: Prof. Ronald Riggio on why dirty politics creates ‘bad’ leaders
It's easy to believe that we are doomed to choose between the lessor of two evils when picking our political leaders. Ronald Riggio, the Henry R. Kravis Professor of Leadership and Organizational Psychology, explains some of the reasons fueling that perception in a Psychology Today column. “Sadly, we have only ourselves (and the political system we support) to blame,” Riggio writes. “Our perceptual biases, our human tendencies, and the way campaigns are run all combine to affect both who we choose as leaders, and how we perceive them.”


Former White House director of economic policy to keynote Southern California Economic Forecast
Economist Todd Buchholz, former White House director of economic policy and a regular contributor to CNBC, will keynote the Southern California Economic Forecast on Wednesday, Oct. 12, at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario. The Southern California Economic Forecast is an annual conference that brings together more than 500 local businesses, community leaders and elected officials. The conference delivers an economic forecast based on local, regional and state indicators.


Roberts Pavilion Dedication highlights the new ‘beating heart’ of the CMC community
Nearly 1,000 members of the Claremont McKenna College community gathered for the Roberts Pavilion Dedication and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony on Sept. 30, a day of celebration several years in the making. CMC’s plan for a campus fitness, athletics, and events center began over a decade ago as a possible renovation of the venerable Ducey Gymnasium.


CMC students co-author Current Biology paper on a male-killing bacterium
It’s not every day that college undergraduates author an article published in a leading science journal. But that’s just what happened for CMC seniors Becky Cheng ’17 and Nitin Kuppanda ’17 last spring. They did the heavy lifting on a Current Biology paper about a bacterium that attacks and kills only males of a certain fruit fly species.


Student Art Council helps Roberts Pavilion, CMCers show their artful side
By Kris Brackmann '17 When asked at a Roberts Pavilion Dedication planning committee meeting last spring if CMC’s Student Art Council would like to be involved in the grand opening, I said, “Absolutely, yes.” In addition to serving as home of CMS Athletics, Roberts Pavilion has so much potential as a CMC gathering place. In reflecting upon the success of the grand opening and Art Council's involvement, I hope to see Roberts Pavilion playing host to more events that tap into the diverse interests of our student body.


CMC to dedicate Roberts Pavilion events center
The official dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony for Roberts Pavilion, Claremont McKenna College’s new center for athletics, events, and recreation, is set to take place on Friday, Sept. 30.


Full Text of Prof. Diana Selig's Convocation Remarks
Diana Selig, the Kingsley Croul Associate Professor of History and George R. Roberts Fellow, was the keynote speaker at Convocation. Here is a transcript of her remarks.  


Prof. Roderic Camp writes about obstacles in Mexico’s rocky road to democracy
Roderic Camp, Philip M. McKenna Professor of the Pacific Rim, writes about Mexico's bumpy path democracy in the Oxford University Press blog.


Alumna and former CMC Trustee Julie Sweet ’89 named to Fortune’s Most Powerful Women list
Julie Sweet '89 has been named No. 39 on Fortune's list of Most Powerful Women in the United States. Sweet, Group CEO of Accenture's North American business, is a former member of the CMC board of trustees.


Tech founder Jumana Abu-Ghazaleh '92 named to the 40 Women to Watch Over 40 list
Jumana Abu-Ghazaleh '92, founder and CEO of betwixt.us, was named to the 40 Women to Watch Over 40 list. Abu-Ghazaleh, a Literature and Philosophy major at CMC, spent more than 20 years in the marketing industry working on brand strategy for American Express, Yahoo, Coca-Cola, Bank of America and Hilton Hotels before shifting gears and founding the online platform betwixt.us. Betwixt aims to correct the trend toward shallow online relationships spreading to working life and "bring rapport to the cloud."


How will federalism affect policy for the next president? The Rose Institute examines the possibilities
The next president will have to address the role of federalism in a number of conflicts between federal and state jurisdiction. And the Rose Institute of State and Local Government has examined some of the policy issues that will likely arise in a recent post by Skip Wiltshire-Gordon '19.


Prof. George Thomas writes about Madison and the perils of populism in 'National Affairs'
George Thomas, the Burnet C. Wohlford Professor of American Political Institutions at CMC, writes in the fall issue of National Affairs that the resurgence of popular democracy presents an opportunity to take a closer look at the importance James Madison and other founders put on "political leadership to refine, channel, and elevate popular wants."


Welcome Orientation Adventure eases incoming CMCers out of their comfort zone
Part of the CMC credo is to encourage students to continually challenge themselves, searching for new perspectives and perhaps along the way, deeper insight. And each year the Welcome Orientation Adventure (WOA) underscores that belief as it seeks to nudge incoming students out of their comfort zone as they begin their college careers. Starting on the third day of first year orientation, WOA is four days and three nights of adventure; this year from August 22-25.


Prof. Zach Courser speaks on "Our Undemocratic Constitution" at the Reagan Library



Forbes profiles Jack Lamb '11, who turned down a Microsoft job and built an organic brewery
Jack Lamb '11, co-founder and CEO of Aslan Brewing Co. in Bellingham, Wash., was profiled in Forbes this month. Offered a marketing job with Microsoft fresh out of CMC, he decided on a different path. “It’s a nice office but it’s still a cubicle zoo,” Lamb told Forbes. “I couldn’t see myself sitting in a cubicle. It wasn’t for me.”  So Lamb took a "random writing job" while deciding his next move. He eventually found his calling, founding an organic microbrewery and restaurant with three friends.


Trump's 'love' for the Constitution is disturbing, Prof. John J. Pitney Jr. writes in USA Today
Donald J. Trump would govern by whim, not the laws and limits established in our founding document, John J. Pitney Jr., the Roy P. Crocker Professor of Politics, writes in USA Today. “I feel very strongly about our Constitution,” Donald Trump told Fox News in January. “I’m proud of it, I love it and I want to go through the Constitution.” That comment was the political equivalent of “I’ll respect you in the morning” — another line that Trump has probably used from time to time, and one that's just about as meaningful.


Myra Moss, CMC philosophy professor, dies at 79
Myra E. Moss Rolle, a Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Government at CMC, died on July 26 in San Marino. She was 79. Moss was a CMC professor of philosophy for 32 years, starting in 1975. She was chairman of the department from 1992 to 1995. She received her B.A. from Pomona College in 1958 and her Ph.D. in Philosophy from Johns Hopkins University in 1965. From 1958-1959, Moss was enrolled in the graduate program in Philosophy at the University of Rome.


Massive character wall puts signature stamp on Roberts Pavilion
All big design and construction jobs are done by crunching the numbers, but the character wall that greets visitors in the main foyer of Claremont McKenna College's new fitness and events center, Roberts Pavilion, was literally done by the letters.


CMC is #9 in 2017 U.S. News & World Report rankings for liberal arts colleges
U.S. News & World Report has ranked Claremont McKenna College No. 9 in its list of the best liberal arts colleges in the nation. In its 2017 rankings, released today, CMC tied for ninth with Davidson College in North Carolina among 239 liberal arts colleges in the U.S.


Video: Prof. Blitz discusses individual natural rights and American government with Bill Kristol
CMC professor of political philosophy Mark Blitz sat down with Bill Kristol to discuss the meaning of individual natural rights and why they form the basis of American government. Blitz and Kristol also considered critiques of American liberal democracy—among them that the American regime promotes inequality or leads to a lowering of standards. Blitz addressed these criticisms and explained why the American regime remains solid and defensible. The conversation is part of Kristol's Conversations with Bill Kristol series.


Message about freedom and diversity of expression from President Chodosh and Dean Uvin
Dear All: In recent days, we have seen much debate about free expression on our campuses, in part provoked by a letter from the Dean of Students at the University of Chicago to incoming students. Some have asked about CMC’s position.


President Chodosh, Prof. Selig stress community, activism at Convocation
CMC welcomed students, faculty, and staff with calls for action, activism, and an inclusive spirit of community at its 70th annual convocation on Tuesday. It was the first convocation to be held at the new Roberts Pavilion.


CMC website redesign, beta version
Dear CMC Community, Welcome back, everyone. After a four-year run, CMC’s website was overdue for an update and redesign. Since January that process has been underway and today the new version will launch. The visually dynamic new homepage is aimed at conveying the College’s unique qualities and approach to liberal arts education. It is also based on solid research on the best practices and the preferences of prospective students — an important audience for the homepage.


2016 CMC Convocation Remarks of President Hiram E. Chodosh
Good morning, and welcome to our Claremont McKenna Convocation for the 2016-17 academic year. We are so excited and so grateful to celebrate the first convocation in the Roberts Pavilion.   Let’s all please recognize George Roberts, our board, and the many generous leaders of our college and community, on whose shoulders we stand today, for helping to realize the vision for this spectacular facility.


Video: Prof. Branwen Williams searches for climate change evidence under arctic sea ice



Prof. Fred Lynch’s op-ed looks at the ‘populist ire’ influencing the presidential campaign
"According to pundits and political scientists, this summer's Republican convention was basically a reactionary reverie in racism and nativism by Donald Trump's white, working and lower middle-class political base," Prof. Fred Lynch writes in the the Washington Examiner. Read the full article.


Prof. Lee Skinner authors key resource in study of Latin American literature
Prof. Lee Skinner's new text, Gender and the Rhetoric of Modernity in Spanish America, 1850–1910, looks at how 19th-century Spanish American writers re-imagined gender roles, modernization, and national identity during Spanish America’s uneven transition toward modernity.


Enterprising alumni breathing life into 'Beverly Hills, 90210' with their popular podcast
To put a Hollywood spin on General Douglas MacArthur’s farewell address to Congress: Old TV shows never die, they just fade away into syndication. But in the case of Beverly Hills, 90210 , which ran for 10 seasons on Fox, the fadeout hasn’t been permanent. That’s because Katherine Spada ’08 and Elizabeth Leader ’09 have taken it upon themselves to revive it with their podcast “The Blaze with Lizzie and Kat!”


Silicon Valley Program gears up with exciting fall curriculum
As CMC’s Silicon Valley Program (SVP) begins its fifth year, it can look back on major successes. To date, 115 students from CMC and other Claremont Colleges have interned and studied in Silicon Valley, working in start-ups, established companies and nonprofit organizations, and learning what it takes to be successful in areas like product development, communications/marketing, human resources, and finance.


Roberts Pavilion, CMC’s new events center, opens for recreational use
Good things come to those who wait. Now the wait is over for the CMC community; Roberts Pavilion has opened for recreational use. And it’s only the beginning. As CMC President Hiram Chodosh said a few months ago during a “Senior Preview Day” at the Pavilion, “to be sure, the Pavilion is the home of CMS Athletics, but it’s a facility intended for use by all students. It’s an events center not just for athletics. The whole campus will be utilizing it.”


CMC Prof. Gary Hamburg authors a text that could become a benchmark of Russian history
It’s not often that an author writes what may come to be considered a seminal work. But that’s what Gary Hamburg, Otho M. Behr Professor of the History of Ideas at CMC, has done with his new book: Russia’s Path toward Enlightenment: Faith, Politics, and Reason, 1500-1801. Published by Yale University Press in June, the book offers an in-depth examination of every important Russian thinker and their ideas regarding faith, politics and reason over a period of three centuries.


Enterprising alums breathing life into 'Beverly Hills, 90210' with their popular podcast
To put a Hollywood spin on General Douglas MacArthur’s farewell address to Congress: Old TV shows never die, they just fade away into syndication. But in the case of Beverly Hills, 90210 , which ran for 10 seasons on Fox, the fadeout hasn’t been permanent. That’s because Katherine Spada ’08 and Elizabeth Leader ’09 have taken it upon themselves to revive it with their podcast “The Blaze with Lizzie and Kat!”


Lindsay Burton ’19 named to national It’s On Us committee
Lindsay Burton ’19 has been named to the It’s On Us Student Advisory Committee for 2016-17. She is one of 28 students from U.S. colleges and military academies who will serve on the organization, which urges students to take the lead in the battle against sexual assault on their campuses and mobilize peers to create cultural and systemic changes.


CMCers get together in Amsterdam for 27th annual Euromeet reunion
When it comes to scheduling reunions, CMC has tendrils that extend far and wide. Last week, they reached all the way to Amsterdam in the Netherlands, which was the site of the 27th annual Euromeet (June 17-19) for CMC alumni, parents, and students.


Now on Netflix: CMC graduates’ documentary shows human toll of Syrian refugee crisis
 


Three CMCers selected as Capital Fellows for 2016-17
Three CMC students (Sofi Cullen ’16, Jessica Jin ’16, and Annika Deurlington ’16) have been selected to participate in the Capital Fellows Programs administered by the Center for California Studies in Sacramento. The Center administers four nationally recognized fellowship programs, collectively known as the Capital Fellows Programs. Three programs select 18 fellows each, and the other 10 from an annual pool of applicants that typically numbers about 500 for each program.


Class of 2011 alumni return to CMC for five-year reunion
Last weekend marked the great CMC get-together for the Class of 2011, which converged on campus for its five-year reunion. This year’s event, which took place June 3-5, was hosted exclusively for the Class of 2011. All other CMC classes celebrated their one-, 10-, 15-, 20-year, etc., reunions during Alumni Weekend earlier in the spring.


Dylan Hoey '17 wins prestigious U.S. State Department fellowship
Dylan Hoey ’17, a Government and History dual major at CMC, has accepted one of this year’s 10 undergraduate Thomas R. Pickering Fellowships, which provide recipients with financial support, mentoring services, and professional development opportunities in order to prepare them for a career with the U.S. Foreign Service. Hoey follows in the footsteps of Dante Toppo ’15, who received the same award in 2014.


CMS athletes win individual national titles in tennis and track
An outstanding 2015-16 year for CMS Athletics and its student-athletes concluded on Saturday, May 28, with two NCAA Division III individual national championships, one by Skyler Butts '16 in men's tennis singles and the other by Tyra Abraham, a women's track sprinter from Scripps. Skyler Butts Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Men's Tennis Sr. (CMC), #1 Singles - Santa Ana, Calif.


Sharon Basso named CMC VP of Student Affairs and Dean of Students
Dear Members of the CMC Community: I am pleased to announce that Sharon Basso, who currently serves as Associate Vice Provost and Dean of Students at Lehigh University, has been selected as our new Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students.


Passings: Richard Grantham, 1927-2016
The CMC community mourns the loss of one of its Pacesetters, Richard Grantham, who passed away this month. A member of the Class of 1950 and a Life Trustee, Grantham was 88. Known as the Pacesetters, the earliest classes of CMCers were the earliest builders of the College -- Grantham and his classmates literally cleared away the countless rocks and large stones on the young campus in a project known as "Operation Rockpile."


Update from President Hiram E. Chodosh on the campus resource center, free speech, computer science, and the Student Opportunities Center
Dear CMC Community: Congratulations to our students and faculty on the conclusion of an intensely challenging and remarkably successful academic year!


CMC Commencement Day 2016 in photos



CMC celebrates its 69th Commencement
New Yorker Editor and Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Remnick was the keynote speaker at the CMC’s 69th Annual Commencement. Remnick, who received an honorary degree from the College, discussed “dissent, speech and politics,” recalling political protest and dissent when he was in college and comparing that time with what he sees today.


Chris Burden's 'Meet in the Middle' sculpture installed in front of Roberts Pavilion



Commencement poem: 'Land of Never-ending Holes' by Henri Cole
Professor of Literature Henri Cole presented the "Land of Never-ending Holes" during the 2016 Claremont McKenna College Commencement.   I don’t want you to leave. I don’t want you to leave this world I so love, where underbrush, jackrabbits,      and the desert press in on us. Waiting under a date palm, with a suitcase and cell phone,      listening for the train whistle—this is how I picture you. Don’t strut or you will stumble. Make your mess into a message.


Dissent, speech and politics the big topic at Commencement 2016
New Yorker Editor and Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Remnick was the keynote speaker at the CMC’s 69th Annual Commencement. Remnick, who received an honorary degree from the College, discussed “dissent, speech and politics,” recalling political protest and dissent when he was in college and comparing that time with what he sees today.


Tune in: Athenas and Stags teams going after national championships
Our academic school year is coming to close with graduation on Saturday, but several of our spring sports teams seasons continue with NCAA Division III postseason competition. The CMS softball, men’s golf, men’s tennis and women’s tennis teams are all competing in their respective NCAA Championships this weekend and the track and field teams compete in their championships later this month. CMS Softball


CMS men's golf team wins NCAA Division III championship
PENFIELD, N.Y. – The Claremont-Mudd-Scripps men's golf team won its first NCAA Division III National Championship and freshman Alex Wrenn (CMC) tied for second place individually on May 13 at Midvale Country Club.


Twenty-nine graduates receive Phi Beta Kappa honors
In the lead-up to Commencement, 29 graduates were honored as Phi Beta Kappa members at an initiation ceremony and dinner on May 12 at the Athenaeum.


Meet the New Athenaeum Fellows for 2016-17
In a rite of Spring, the Marian Minor Cook Athenaeum has named two new Athenaeum Woolley Fellows for 2016-17: Sarah Sanbar ’17 and Michael Grouskay ’17.


CMC students honored with prestigious fellowships and awards
Scholarship. At CMC, it’s a term that may be measured by the number of prestigious academic fellowships and national awards students win each year — often with a regularity that belies the hard work necessary to achieve those honors.


Bill Arce: Our Coach of Coaches
Thank you for the moving honor to speak today at the memorial of one of my heroes, Bill Arce. This is a sad, inspiring moment. Sad in our loss, and inspiring in the many lessons of Coach Arce’s life and work. Like many of you here today, I played many sports as a kid. Of all, baseball seared the most lasting memories and associations. We all know that Yogi Berra said that he didn’t really say most of the things he said, but he did point out that baseball was 90% mental and the other half physical.


Nothing less than divine
By Yi Shun Lai ’96 CMC’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship hosted its second annual Angel Summit during this year’s Alumni Weekend. Award-winning technology journalist Kara Swisher interviewed two successful CMC entrepreneurs, Henry Albrecht ’91 and Jason Soll ’11. Both stressed the importance of mission and heart in any entrepreneurial endeavor, approaching the subject from different angles.


Professor Espinosa wins Princeton Fellowship in political science
?Gastón Espinosa, Arthur V. Stoughton Professor of Religious Studies at CMC, has been named the 2016-17 William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion and Public Life in the Department of Politics at Princeton University. Professor Espinosa’s one-year fellowship will begin in September and will include research work on a project called “The Spiritual Impulse of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement.”


Purpose, core beliefs, and values driving success in CMS Athletics
As the doors of Roberts Pavilion open this fall, CMS Athletics will usher in a new era of enhanced opportunity to enrich students' academic experiences with competitive and recreational activities that support the educational missions of Claremont McKenna, Harvey Mudd, and Scripps Colleges. In recent months, department staff and college administrators worked together to reflect on the purpose, core beliefs, and values that drive CMS Athletics’ success.


Umar Farooq '17 named 2016 Truman Scholar
Umar Farooq ’17 has been named a 2016 Truman Scholar, one of the country’s most prestigious and competitive scholarships. Farooq follows Zachariah Oquenda '16 who won the award last year and 17 other CMCers who have won the award over the years. Grace Lee '17 joined Farooq as one of a select-few finalists for the award this year.  "It's still sinking in, to be entirely honest," said Farooq. 


Syed Umar Farooq '17 named 2016 Truman Scholar
Syed Umar Farooq ’17 has been named a 2016 Truman Scholar, one of the country’s most prestigious and competitive scholarships. Farooq follows Zachariah Oquenda '16 who won the award last year and 17 other CMCers who have won the award over the years. Former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright, president of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation, announced the 54 new Truman Scholars, all college juniors, from among a record number of applicants and institutions: 775 candidates nominated by 305 colleges and universities.


Student Art Showcase to feature open-mic performances and visual arts
It will be art for art’s sake this Alumni Weekend when the third annual Student Art Showcase kicks off on Friday with a series of performances and student art pieces. Hosted and funded by the CMC Art Council, the Showcase’s goal is to promote student artwork (both visual and performance) on campus with an eye toward installing various visual art pieces in dorms, administrative buildings, the Athenaeum, and elsewhere on campus. The Showcase provides an opportunity for students to display their photos, paintings, prints, and other artworks for the CMC community to appreciate.


Graduate Schools across the Country Vie for CMC Philosophy Major
Caroline Bowman ’16 is definitely in demand. The CMC senior, who graduates this fall with a degree in Philosophy, has been accepted to 15 prestigious graduate schools and is wait-listed at one other. The schools to which Bowman has been accepted include: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, NYU, Princeton, Stanford, UC San Diego, University of Chicago, UNC Chapel Hill, University of Pittsburgh, UT Austin, University of Toronto and Yale. She was also admitted into the equivalent of a master’s program at Oxford University and was wait-listed at UC Berkeley.


Claremont rugby clubs win regional titles
VALLEJO, Calif. – The Claremont Colleges Men's Rugby Club won the PacWest Regional Championship with wins over the University of Denver (48-16) in the Round of 16 on April 15 and New Mexico Highlands (37-22) in the regional finals on April 16 at California State University Maritime Academy.


Art major at CMC finds fertile ground for her endeavor
Thinking of majoring in art at CMC? Many do, taking advantage of the unique opportunities CMC offers by being part of the larger Claremont Colleges. CMC students can enroll in art classes at any of the other 5Cs and can pursue their art major through Pitzer, Pomona or Scripps.


Inside CMC Day – Introducing the ‘Student Vertical’
Last Friday, high school students from around the world converged on campus for “Inside CMC Day,” a full day of events and activities geared to acquainting students who’ve decided to attend CMC in the fall (and those who are on the fence) with what the College has to offer. It was billed as a “Student Vertical,” which, according to President Hiram Chodosh in his welcoming remarks in Pickford Auditorium, was meant to give the touring students a sense of trajectory at CMC — that each step they take while at college will be part of a larger, overarching development cycle.


Women’s Rugby outfoxes its way to Division III West Region title
RIVERSIDE, Calif. – Playing in front of its biggest crowd of the season, the Claremont Colleges Women’s Rugby Club won the first-ever contested USA Rugby Division III West Regional championship, 27-5 over the University of San Francisco on April 10, to conclude its 2016 season. The day before in the semifinals, the Claremont Foxes defeated St. Mary’s (Calif.) 38-12.


CMC seniors are first to preview Roberts Pavilion
Last Friday (April 8), the wait was finally over for seniors who queued up early for the chance to be the first CMC students as part of “Senior Preview Days” to tour the Roberts Pavilion ahead of its complete opening in August. The doors of the LEED Gold-certified building opened at 10 a.m. and the first group of students was greeted in the lobby by President Hiram Chodosh just beneath a towering wall adorned with a jumble of letters, an interactive word map.


Students find Ancient Rome in Los Angeles
Claremont McKenna is known for bringing textbook learning to life, and sometimes one need look no further than the metropolis right at our doorstep. Forty-five students from Professor Shane Bjornlie’s Roman history classes and from the 5C classical studies program spent a day perusing the antiquities collection at the Getty Villa on April 10. The excursion was funded by CMC's Mellon Foundation grant. 


5C a cappella group wins 'Sing for Survivors' contest and will perform at the White House
An a cappella singing group called the “After School Specials” made up of students from the five colleges, took top honors winning the “’Til It Happens to You: Sing for Survivors” vocal contest, and now the group has been invited to sing at the White House on Thursday, April 14.


Prof. Shana Levin named Associate Dean of the Faculty for Research
Shana Levin, Crown Professor of Psychology and George R. Roberts Fellow, has been named Associate Dean of the Faculty for Research, effective July 1. In this role, Levin will support the College’s faculty research efforts, chairing the Faculty Research Committee, overseeing all of the research institutes, serving as a member of the senior academic cabinet in the Dean of the Faculty’s office, and as a member of the College’s senior staff. She will continue to teach in the psychology department. Lee Skinner will continue in her role as Associate Dean of the Faculty for Teaching.


CMC’s incoming Class of 2020 has stories to tell
Each fall Claremont McKenna College welcomes an incoming class of new students who hail from around the world. Many come from countries thousands of miles away; others make the trek to CMC from within the U.S. Despite obvious differences, CMC’s incoming Class of 2020 – whether from Orange County or Uzbekistan – share a common bond: the desire to learn, to grow, to lead, to be challenged and to contribute. And to achieve those goals, they travel here because they chose CMC and for its part, the College seconded that motion.


Claremont McKenna College to host 2016 Climate Leadership Summit
Claremont McKenna College has been selected to host the National Campus Leadership Council’s (NCLC) 2016 Climate Leadership Summit on Saturday, April 23, from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. CMC students Sam Becker ’19, Will Su ’16, and Jessica Bass ’17 submitted a proposal nominating CMC as host of the 2016 Climate Leadership Summit. The NCLC, Defend Our Future, and the Environmental Defense Fund then selected CMC to host the only summit on the West Coast.


Tyler West '16 headed to ‘The Big Easy’ for two-year stint with Teach For America
Tyler West ’16 is a student of principle who walks the walk. After graduating from CMC this spring, West, who accepted a Fulbright in Thailand to teach English in 2017, will head east to do just that before moving to New Orleans, La., for a teaching stint with Teach For America (TFA), a national nonprofit working to expand educational opportunity for low-income students. TFA Corps members commit to teach for two years in high-need urban or rural public schools. Many become lifelong leaders in pursuit of educational equity.


Study Abroad and Washington Program Photo Contest winners
A message from the Office of Off-Campus Study: Congratulations to the Washington Program and Study Abroad photo content winners. We received so many wonderful entries and it was difficult to select just a few winning entries. Thank you to all the students who submitted photos. Here's a slide show of the winning entries:


The After School Specials win #TIHTY Sing for Survivors a cappella contest
The After School Specials, the Claremont Colleges a cappella group, won the Til It Happens to You: Sing for Survivors contest, lending their voices to the fight against sexual abuse on college campuses.


Prof. Stacey Doan receives NIH grant to boost smoking prevention programs
Assistant Psychology Professor Stacey N. Doan has been awarded a two-year grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health. The $450,000 grant will support research titled "Rescuing Cognitive & Emotional Regulatory Processes to Aid Smoking Prevention." Doan will work in collaboration with colleagues from Boston University to improve the effectiveness of standard informational smoking prevention programs by improving cognitive and emotion regulatory abilities among at-risk adolescents.


Ultramarathon Man: 100-mile run by Ivan Zinn '96 gets the adventure film treatment
Ivan Q. Zinn '96 is in it for the long run ... the really, really long run. Zinn, founder and managing partner of Atalaya Capital Management in New York City, is an ultramarathoner, which means his races are just getting started as he reaches the 26.2-mile marathon distance.


Diversity and Inclusion at CMC: An Update
Over the past few months, the College has taken a number of significant steps to reinforce diversity and inclusion as a significant dimension of CMC’s leadership mission. The Personal and Social Responsibility Initiative Steering Committee has intensified its work to develop a comprehensive inclusion strategy that provides tailored resources to students. Recent climate surveys, individual and group interviews, and historical data inform the strategy.


Terrance J. Tumey appointed CMS Director of Athletics
Dear All: We are thrilled to let you know that Terrance J. Tumey will be the new Claremont McKenna-Harvey Mudd-Scripps (CMS) Colleges Director of Athletics, Physical Education & Recreational Services.


Prof. Henri Cole honored with Award of Merit Medal by the American Academy of Arts and Letters
CMC literature Prof. Henri Cole has been honored with the Award of Merit Medal by the American Academy of Arts and Letters, putting him in the company of the finest American writers and artists of the past century. The Award of Merit has been given each year since 1942 to an outstanding person in America representing painting, the short story, sculpture, the novel, poetry, or drama in rotation. Previous medalists include Ernest Hemingway, Aldous Huxley, Thomas Mann, Vladimir Nabokov, Hilda Doolittle, and Andrew Wyeth.


CMC’s World Model UN team wins second successive international competition
History repeats. CMC’s World Model UN (WorldMUN) team won Best Small Delegation at the Harvard World Model United Nations Conference from March 14-18 in Rome. This establishes CMC as a back-to-back world champion at what is considered to be the “Olympics of MUN,” after the team’s victory in the same category last year in Seoul, South Korea.  In the Small Delegation category, CMC competed against some of the best teams from the U.S., including West Point, Yale, Georgetown, and Berkeley.


Q&A With Nyree Gray, CMC’s Assistant VP for Diversity and Inclusion
Upon her recent appointment as CMC's Assistant VP for Diversity and Inclusion, Nyree Gray discusses prospects, progress and challenges as she moves into her new role.  Q. Why is diversity and inclusion important to CMC?


Prof. Amy Kind on the power of imagination to change the world
Prof. Amy Kind has started blogging about imagination in support of Knowledge Through Imagination, a new Oxford University Press book she co-edited with Peter Kung. Kind's first post is an exploration of the power of imagination in which she asks "Sure, imagination is powerful. But can it really change the world?"


Professor Kathleen Purvis-Roberts awarded prestigious fellowship to help shape Asian-Pacific environmental policies with U.S. State Department
Professor Kathleen Purvis-Roberts has been awarded a 2016-17 Jefferson Science Fellowship (JSF), a program run by the National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine.


Professor Kathleen Purvis- Roberts awarded prestigious fellowship to help shape Asian-Pacific environmental policies with US State Department
Professor Kathleen Purvis- Roberts has been awarded a 2016-17 Jefferson Science Fellowship (JSF), a program run by the National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine.


CMC students share off-campus experiences at annual ‘Moments in Minutes’ event
Editor’s Note: This story was written before the final Moments in Minutes results were announced. The first place winner is Lindsey Mattila ’17, the second place winner is Emily Chambard ’16 and third place winner is Jenya Green ’16 . In the coming weeks, all the presentations will be posted on the Office of Off-Campus Study website. By OCS Peer Ambassador Jenya Green ’16


A message on the passing of Coach Bill Arce
Dear CMC and CMS Athletics Communities, With much sadness, we want you all to know that a beloved member of our community, Bill Arce, founding Claremont-Mudd-Scripps (CMS) athletic director and Stags head baseball coach, passed away Monday. He was at Pomona Valley Hospital in the presence of his close family. Coach Arce was 90. Coach Arce has touched so many lives, so many generations of Claremont athletes—as the architect of our acclaimed athletics program, as the epitome of the scholar-athlete ideal, as mentor, friend, and colleague to so many members of our community.


Alumnus Jay Flatley stepping down as Illumina CEO, will continue pushing for advances in DNA research
CMC alumnus Jay Flatley '74 P'03 is stepping down as CEO of San Diego-based biotech firm Illumina. Flatley, who helped lead the creation of the market for sequencing human DNA and increased Illumina's revenue from $500,000 to $2.2 billion during his 17 years as chief executive, will remain with the company as executive chairman and focus on strategy and advocating for further use of DNA sequencing in medicine.


Dave Zirin talks about the politics of sport in Ath presentation
In his presentation (“Game Over: The Collision of Sports and Politics in the U.S.”) at the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum, Dave Zirin, who writes about the politics of sports for The Nation magazine, referenced another historian, Howard Zinn, who said: “I study history not because I want to learn more about the past, but because I want to change the future.”


Carroll Stevens named CMC Vice President of Advancement
Carroll Stevens has been named Vice President of Advancement for the College.


Robert Day Scholars practice the 'Art of the Pitch' in leadership development workshop
For the third year in a row Robert Day Scholars at CMC practiced pitching senior executives (who also happen to be CMC alumni) in a “Pitch Day” workshop that is designed to give students the opportunity to develop and practice all-important presentation skills that they will use early in their careers.


Professor Aaron Leconte earns prestigious Cottrell Award
Aaron Leconte, assistant professor of chemistry at the W.M. Keck Science Department, a collaboration between Claremont McKenna, Pitzer, and Scripps Colleges, has been awarded a three-year early career grant from the Research Corporation for Scientific Advancement. The $100,000 Cottrell Award will support Leconte’s research on the protein luciferase, a luminescent material produced by the North American firefly that can be used to track and record biological events and processes to better understand cancer, bacterial infections, and more.


Nyree Gray promoted to CMC Assistant VP for Diversity and Inclusion
?Nyree Gray, CMC’s Chief Civil Rights Officer, will take on an expanded role and additional title as Assistant Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion, President Hiram Chodosh announced Wednesday. Gray will assist efforts across all offices at the College to support a diverse and inclusive student body, faculty, and staff.


Students Make Valuable Career Connections
Dozens of students spent their winter break networking with industry executives and employers in the Silicon Valley, New York City and the Northwest. Read about their experiences in the following stories: CMC students make the networking rounds on Evans ITAB trip to Silicon Valley


Ath Speaker John Prendergast Explodes Some Myths About Africa
See Larissa Peltola's '18 recent interview with John Prendergast.   Human rights activist, best-selling author and expert on Africa, John Prendergast, had some good news to share – and a few ingrained illusions to shatter – during his presentation at the Marion Miner Cook Athenaeum last week, co-sponsored by the Mgrublian Center for Human Rights.


New Podcast Makes Hearing Athenaeum Speakers a Virtual Reality
by Tom Johnson A big benefit of enrollment at CMC is the opportunity to hear the amazing array of speakers (and subjects) featured at the Marion Miner Cook Athenaeum almost every day of every week. But for Shivani Pandya ‘18 and four of her sophomore friends (Lauren Giurata ’18, Nisha Behrman ’18, Janine Ivy ’18 and Melissa Muller ’18), that benefit also presented a challenge.


Entrepreneurship Week at CMC
Claremont McKenna College (CMC) celebrated its third annual Entrepreneurship Week, Feb. 1-5. Students, faculty, and alumni joined together in their shared passion for innovation, participating in events organized by one of CMC’s newest research institutes, The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CIE).


RDS networking trip to Seattle and Portland is a real rainmaker for students
The weather might have been wet in January during the Pacific Northwest Networking Trip to Portland, OR and Seattle, WA sponsored by the Robert Day School of Economics and Finance at CMC. Nonetheless, it was also “raining” connections for the group of students that participated in the event, which was inaugurated in 2013 with a networking trip to Seattle.


FEI networking trip to New York City reaffirms bond between students and alumni
Last month a group of 16 highly motivated CMC students took part in the 11th annual networking trip to New York City co-sponsored by the Financial Economic Institute (FEI). The purpose of the trip is to provide students (13 sophomores and 3 juniors) with an opportunity to establish relationships with CMC alumni working in New York City while also learning about various job opportunities in the city’s financial markets. The ultimate goal is for these relationships to evolve into summer internships and full-time employment opportunities for CMC students.


CMC students make the networking rounds on Evans ITAB trip to Silicon Valley
Last month (Jan. 10-15), a group of 20 CMC students participated in the 11th Annual Evans Information Technology Advisory Board (ITAB) Networking Trip to Silicon Valley. It was a chance for the CMCers to “grin and grab” with some of the tech industry’s elite movers and shakers and, at the same time, make connections that could really pay dividends in the future. And they made the most of the opportunity.


Prof. Amy Kind is editor of new book: 'The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination'
Imagination occupies a central place in philosophy, going back to Aristotle. However, following a period of relative neglect there has been an explosion of interest in imagination in the past two decades as philosophers examine the role of imagination in debates about the mind and cognition, aesthetics and ethics, as well as epistemology, science and mathematics.


Hannah Oh '16 calls for federal budget reform in opinion piece in "The Hill"
Hannah Oh, a December CMC graduate with a degree in government, called for federal budgetary reform in an article in The Hill's Congress Blog this week.


Prof. Ralph Rossum on Justice Scalia’s legacy of originalism in the "Washington Examiner"
Antonin Scalia's greatest legacy will be the originalist stamp he put on the Supreme Court, writes CMC Prof. Ralph Rossum in an opinion piece in the Washington Examiner. Rossum, the Salvatori Professor of American Constitutionalism, noted that briefs citing a constitutional originalist argument went from 7 percent of the total briefs filed to 35 percent in Scalia's two decades on the court.


Prof. Amy Kind authors new book: "The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination"
Imagination occupies a central place in philosophy, going back to Aristotle. However, following a period of relative neglect there has been an explosion of interest in imagination in the past two decades as philosophers examine the role of imagination in debates about the mind and cognition, aesthetics and ethics, as well as epistemology, science and mathematics.


New airport CEO, Kelly J. Fredericks, to deliver keynote address at Claremont conference
Recently named CEO of the Ontario International Airport Authority (OIAA), Kelly J. Fredericks, will be the keynote speaker at a conference hosted by the Inland Empire Center at Claremont McKenna College (CMC) on Friday, March 4, 2016. This will be one of the first opportunities for area leaders to meet Mr.


Zach Ingrasci ’12 and Chris Temple ’12 screen their new film “Salam Neighbor”
By Bri Munoz '18


Hannah Oh '16 calls for federal budget reform in opinion piece in "The Hill"
Hannah Oh, a December CMC graduate with a degree in government, called for federal budgetary reform in an article in The Hill's Congress Blog this week.


"A Journey and Not a Race” with Green Careers Conference Keynote speaker Michael Graber ’74
By Jackson Umberger ’16


Chief civil rights officer Nyree Gray honored as outstanding alumna by Southwestern Law School
Nyree Gray, CMC's Title IX coordinator and chief civil rights officer, was named the 2016 Outstanding Alumna of the Year by the Black Law Students Assn. of Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles.


Michael Roth Discusses the Value of a Liberal Arts Education at the Ath
Michael S. Roth has served as President of Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut since 2007. But he can remember humbler beginnings long before that. From 1983-1995 he was a history professor in Claremont which included a two-year stint at CMC teaching European history from 1648 to the present. “CMC was short a European historian and I was short of money,” he said generating a big laugh from the Marion Miner Cook Athenaeum audience during a presentation he made last week.


Famed Cuban novelist Wendy Guerra comes to campus, Feb. 22-26
Award-winning author Wendy Guerra, one of Cuba’s most important new literary voices, will visit CMC the week of February 22- 26 for a number of events with students and faculty. with the support of a Mellon Foundation Global Visiting Scholar Grant and the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures. 


Two events to highlight and promote women and leadership
Two upcoming events will highlight women in leadership roles and their trajectories toward those roles. Women and Leadership Workshop The Claremont Colleges Women and Leadership Alliance, a joint endeavor to support and promote student programs at the Claremont Colleges that will highlight issues faced by women in leadership in business, government and the professions, will hold its 7th Annual Women and Leadership Workshop on Friday, Feb. 19, 2016.


Harvard Law Professor Randall Kennedy talks about race in Athenaeum program
Randall Kennedy, the Michael R. Klein Professor at Harvard Law School, wanted input from attendees of his Marion Miner Cook Athenaeum talk (“The Race Line in American Life”) last Wednesday. The project for which he solicited input stems from Martin Luther King Jr.’s last public speech; the famous “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech he gave on April 3, 1968, the day before he was assassinated.


Prof. Shane Bjornlie wins book award
History Prof. Shane Bjornlie's first book, Politics and Tradition Between Rome, Ravenna and Constantinople (Cambridge University Press, 2013) has received the First Book Award for 2016 from the Classical Association of the Midwest and South.


Year of Decisions: Presidential Election 2016
  Claremont McKenna College faculty members are available for expert comment across a wide range of issues related to the presidential election. For additional assistance, contact the Office of Public Affairs & Communications at (909) 621-8099 or (909) 607-9246.  


EnviroLab Asia clinic trip to Singapore and Borneo opens eyes to urgent environmental concerns
Faculty and students from The Claremont Colleges and Yale-NUS held the first EnviroLab Asia clinic trip to Singapore and Borneo (Jan. 4-13) to conduct research on the relationship between deforestation, oil palm and marine life in Southeast Asia.


Exciting Speaker Lineup for TEDxClaremont Colleges 2016 Announced
TEDxClaremontColleges has finalized their speaker list for their 2016 event, which will take place on February 20th at Scripps College's Garrison Theater. The speakers will share their perspectives on the future based upon their work and lived experiences. Click here for images and bios of the following speakers:


National champion Stags “ring” in the new season with CMC’s President Chodosh
CLAREMONT, Calif. – A new season is here for the top-ranked, defending national champion Claremont-Mudd-Scripps men’s tennis team. And while the focus now is on the 2016 season that lies ahead, the 2015 national championship team earlier this week had one more opportunity to celebrate their incredible championship run.


Elizabeth Wydra '98 Named New President of Constitutional Accountability Center
The following is taken from a January 20 story on Elizabeth Wydra '98 by Tony Mauro in The National Law Journal: The liberal Constitutional Accountability Center is set to announce Wednesday that Elizabeth Wydra, its longtime chief counsel, will succeed founder Doug Kendall, who died in September, as president.


Joining together to clear the way for CMC to move forward
Operation Rockpile may have best exemplified the inspirational partnership of the College's early days when students, faculty and even President George Benson came together in an ongoing series of rock-clearing parties to rid the campus of the ever-present “Claremont potatoes” (rocks). The school paper The Analyst even speculated on whether Pomona's physical education department would grant credit for these rock-clearing efforts.


Rose Institute reports March Air Reserve Base economic impact of $579 million annually to Inland Empire
March Air Reserve Base in Riverside, Calif. has an annual economic impact totaling $579 million in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, according to a report issued today by the Rose Institute of State and Local Government at Claremont McKenna College.


CMC Washington Program Students Win Awards
Six CMC students and one student from Pomona College who will participate in the spring 2016 Washington Program have won prestigious scholarship awards that will make their semester internships in the nation’s capitol that much easier.


CMC welcomes Early Decision students who will be part of the “Class of 2020”
For many graduating high school seniors, there is nothing quite like the feeling of exhilaration (and relief!) on being accepted into a college or university of their choice. And for college-bound students who have staked their hopes on Early Decision acceptance from a particular place of higher learning, the experience can be even more exciting. Early decision is a common policy used in college admissions in the U.S. for admitting students to undergraduate programs in which candidates consider a certain institution to be their top choice.


Difference and “Otherness” Explored in Student Performance
At a moment when understanding and appreciating difference in the world could never be more timely, CMC students acted out scenes at the Athenaeum on December 3 which dealt with this very issue. It was the workshop production of the Freshman Humanities seminar entitled “Bollywood: Dreams in their Social-Historical Context” taught by the Chair of CMC’s History Department, Professor Nita Kumar.


Are Russia's geopolitical moves hurting it's economy?
With Russia’s geopolitical maneuvers grabbing headlines around the world, CMC’s Podlich Family Professor of Government and George R. Roberts Fellow Hilary Appel has co-authored an article titled “A Difficult Year: How the Kremlin’s Ambitions Hamper Economic Growth.”


CMC students demonstrate tech savvy at 5C Hackathon
CMC was well-represented by tech-savvy students in the latest 5C Hackathon that took place in late November at Pomona College. A team from CMC (Dhruv Manchala ’16 and Scott Sonnenborn ’17) won in the “Advanced 1st Place” category. Another mixed team of two CMCers and a Pomona College student (Davis Catolico ‘18, Kevin Cunanan ‘18 and Gianna Wu P ’19) took home the “Best App for Scaling Human Connection” award sponsored by Airbnb.


Robert Day School leadership workshops teach ethics and the art of persuasion
During November, the Robert Day Scholars Program hosted two leadership development workshops that were intended to extend the students’ knowledge base while providing them with practical frameworks that could be utilized in their careers. An Ethics in Leadership Workshop convened on November 13th in the Kravis Center that was taught jointly by Alex Rajczi, the Deborah and Kenneth Novack ’67 Associate Professor of Leadership and Ethics at CMC and Ken Novack ’67, Chairman of Avinger, Inc. and member of the CMC Board of Trustees.


Alumnus Dean Taylor ’73 retires after 40 years in baseball with third World Championship ring
With 162 games during the regular season (not including Spring Training and postseason), a front office career in Major League Baseball is a grind, even if it’s just for one season. Dean Taylor ’73 worked in professional baseball for 40 years and has watched between 7,500 and 8,000 games for teams he has been involved with.


For Zephanii Smith ‘13, life after CMC includes addressing the United Nations
Time and again, surveys have cited public speaking to top the list of human fears – even more than impending death!  So what would it be like to give a speech in as imposing an edifice as the United Nations Headquarters in New York City? For Zephanii Smith ’13, who earlier in the month addressed an impressive list of organization heads and some of the world’s leading female entrepreneurs there as a 2015 Women’s Entrepreneurship Day Fellow, it was something to take in stride and be “thrilled about.”


Robert Day School marketing workshop encourages students to craft persuasive stories
A marketing, strategy, and communication workshop was held Nov. 5, 6 at The Robert Day School of Economics and Finance that encouraged students to consider “context” and think outside the box.  The two-part workshop (“Marketing New Ventures”) was held in the Kravis Center’s Freeberg Forum and was co-facilitated by Jumana Abu-Ghazela '92, the Founder of betwixt.us and Christine Crockett, Associate Director of CMC's Center for Writing and Public Discourse.


Call the expert witness
Who you gonna call when expert testimony is needed to move certain legal cases forward? Wei-Chin Hwang, Professor of Clinical Psychology at CMC, is one man with the knowledge and experience that can help resolve issues and even break a deadlock.


President Chodosh: "Strengthening Our Community and Our Resolve"
Dear CMC Community: The Thanksgiving holiday provides a special time for reflection, reconnection, and reinforcing the value of family and community. Growing up, this was my favorite national holiday. I remember football games, mashed potatoes, and especially the heated debates we had around the table. For my family, argument was a kind of verbal contact sport and could be intensely emotional and disruptive; yet, these difficult conversations sharpened my thinking, made me appreciate different viewpoints, and built a deeper bond of love and belonging in my family.


Dean Peter Uvin reinforces freedom of speech at CMC
Dear colleagues: I hereby write you to address the concerns many of you have raised about freedom of speech in the current context of discussion on our campus.


Athenaeum Panel discusses art in public spaces
In the second of a two-part series sponsored by CMC’s Gould Center for Humanistic Studies and the Public Art Committee, the topic of public art in the public domain was discussed by a panel of internationally recognized artists, museum curators and scholars.


Byron Cohen '16 chosen for highly-competitive Mitchell Scholarship
Byron Cohen '16 has been chosen by the US-Ireland Alliance as one of a select few George J. Mitchell Scholars following interviews in Washington, D.C. on November 20.  284 students applied for the national award for only 12 scholarships. Named in honor of the former Maine Senator’s contributions to the Northern Ireland peace process.  Recipients are chosen on the basis of academic distinction, leadership and service and spend a year of post-graduate study at institutions of higher learning in Ireland. Cohen will study public health at University College Dublin.


EnviroLab Asia sheds light on environmental destruction occurring on a massive scale
EnviroLab Asia (a five-college initiative) recently held a series of events, workshops and a concert on campus (Nov. 1st, 6th and 9th) focusing attention on grave environmental issues currently facing the Asian continent. EnviroLab Asia is an outgrowth of an exploratory grant that CMC received this year from The Henry Luce Foundation’s Luce Initiative on Asian Studies and the Environment (LIASE).


President Chodosh details our imperatives
Dear All: During the past several days, I have listened and responded to many alumni, parents, and commentators on the periphery of our community, as well as students, faculty, and staff within the College. I have heard strong support or deep concerns (or some measure of both) in the wake of controversy, protests, administrative actions, expressions of dissent, and news coverage throughout. Disagreement is stressful for all of us, and it is also completely healthy when the campus is having a serious, difficult conversation about extremely sensitive and important concerns.


CMC Model U.N. team takes top honors at TrojanMUN
CMC’s Model United Nations (MUN) Team had some pretty big shoes to fill at this year’s TrojanMUN Conference held last weekend (Oct. 29-Nov. 1). After all, last year CMC’s MUN team ranked 6th in the nation. CMC’s MUN team also won the “Best Delegation” designation at TrojanMUN last year. “We won Best Large Delegation, which is the highest delegation award that each conference gives out,” says CMC MUN team member, Naina Mullick ‘17  “Additionally, a number of delegates won individual awards for their performance in committee.”


Message outlining action steps for diversity support
Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff: Yesterday, I spent the day and evening with about forty students in my office, actively listening to their personal and shared experiences, deep concerns, and imaginative, constructive suggestions.


CMC Model United Nations Team Takes Top Honors at TrojanMUN
CMC’s Model United Nations (MUN) Team had some pretty big shoes to fill at this year’s TrojanMUN Conference held last weekend (Oct. 29-Nov. 1). After all, last year CMC’s MUN team ranked 6th in the nation. CMC’s MUN team also won the “Best Delegation” designation at TrojanMUN last year. “We won Best Large Delegation, which is the highest delegation award that each conference gives out,” says CMC MUN team member, Naina Mullick ‘17  “Additionally, a number of delegates won individual awards for their performance in committee.”


Laverne Cox, award-winning transgender actress, producer, and equal rights advocate, to speak at Athenaeum
An advocate with an empowering message of moving beyond gender expectations to live more authentically, Laverne Cox, Emmy-nominated actress, documentary film producer, and prominent equal rights advocate, is scheduled to speak at the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum on December 4, 2015. Debuting in the groundbreaking role of Sophia Burset in the critically acclaimed Netflix original series “Orange is The New Black,” Cox is the first trans woman of color to have a leading role in a mainstream scripted television show.


Dreier Roundtable examines roots of polarization in Constitution
By Tom Johnson Teachable moments from distinguished panelists were on the agenda at the latest Dreier Roundtable (DRt); a half-day conference held last Friday in the Kravis Center and the Marion Miner Cook Athenaeum. The Roundtable convened a group of policy experts, politicians, academics, journalists and professionals who focused on the topic: “Examining the Roots of Polarization in Our Constitutional Order.”


CMC symposium underscores math as cornerstone of everything we do
By Tom Johnson At a panel discussion at the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum last Wednesday on new ideas in mathematics, the professors were out to prove something that had nothing to do with complex theorems and the kinds of postulates only numbers geeks can love. Instead, in “Math for the New Millennium: Ideas that Change the World,” CMC mathematics professors Asuman Aksoy P ‘05, Blake Hunter, Chiu-Ken Kao and Lenny Fukshansky endeavored to show how – in mathematics – what goes around, comes around.


Kravis Prize recipient Landesa receives Hilton Humanitarian Prize
Landesa, the inaugural recipient of the 2006 Henry R. Kravis Prize in Nonprofit Leadership, has won the 2015 Hilton Humanitarian Prize. Established by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation to recognize organizations that make extraordinary contributions to alleviating human suffering, the $2 million prize is the world's largest.


Professor Pitney to give a lecture at Nixon Library
Professor Jack Pitney at the Richard Nixon Library and Museum Thursday, Oct. 29, at 7 p.m.   The Richard Nixon Library & Museum 18001 Yorba Linda Boulevard Yorba Linda, CA 92886 The Richard Nixon Foundation will host Claremont McKenna College Roy P. Crocker Professor of Politics Dr. Jack Pitney at the Nixon Library and Museum for a lecture and book signing related to his latest work, The Politics of Autism.


Alumni in action: Jerry Lin ’07 launches Helix Sleep
Jerry Lin ’07 majored in Economics with Honors and the Financial Economics sequence at CMC. Truth to tell, he lost a lot of sleep cramming for exams, but he’s made up for it with a new ecommerce business he recently launched – Helix Sleep – that deals in mattresses. And so far, media buzz on his company (stories in Fast Company, Entrepreneur, Fortune and Fox News) is enough to keep anyone wide awake.


CMC convenes 2nd annual Dreier Roundtable Conference
Government & Law, Politics
Claremont McKenna College announced today that its second annual Dreier Roundtable Conference will take place with a half-day event at CMC on Oct. 9 that will discuss the roots of political conflict that exist in divergent visions of the U.S. Constitution. The purpose of the conference is to engage students, political practitioners and faculty in a discussion of the structural problems of American institutions. The conference is part of a bipartisan public forum that includes panelists from the Brookings Institution, the American Enterprise Institute, and The New York Times; as well as former members of the U.S. House and Senate and academics from CMC, Pomona College and Johns Hopkins University. Since the American founding, broad agreement on the republican principles embodied in the Constitution has long been a necessary condition for legitimate political conflict. But what if the broad consensus over the Constitution breaks down? What if the nature of the conflict that currently animates our politics, which has often been encapsulated by the term “polarization,” is in fact the result of underlying disagreements on the basis of the American regime? Are we primarily attempting to manage conflict among factions with differing conceptions of constitutional order? The Dreier Roundtable at Claremont McKenna College is organizing a yearlong research project for the 2015-16 academic year devoted to examining the constitutional roots of political conflict in American politics. Through a series of conference meetings, convening events, and commissioned working papers leading to a published edited volume with a major academic press, the Roundtable will contribute to our national dialogue on American republican principles and the political competition over visions of the Constitution. The Roundtable is an innovative new public policy initiative at Claremont McKenna College that convenes leaders in politics, business, journalism and academia to hold constructive, substantive public discussions about issues that affect the future prosperity of the United States and the world. The Dreier Roundtable’s first event at the Oct. 9 conference will feature an economic panel discussion entitled “Federal Reserve: Administration vs. Accountability,” followed by a political panel discussion, “Examining Polarization in the Supreme Court.” A plenary roundtable session will then take place addressing the “Roots of Polarization in our Constitutional Order.” Event Information Economics Panel – “Federal Reserve: Administration vs. Accountability,” 8:30 – 9:45am, Freeberg Forum, Kravis Center, Lower Level, #62 Since its establishment in 1918, the Federal Reserve has been an exemplar of the Progressive Era’s faith in rule by experts over rule by politicians. But is the Fed an ideal of expert administration and a progressive success story? Or does the Fed benefit from a contingent moment of broad consensus on inflation? Can the Fed actually affect policy change beyond its remit on inflation, in areas like unemployment? Scott Sumner—Ralph G. Hawtrey Chair of Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, professor of economics at Bentley University Alex Pollock—Resident Fellow, American Enterprise Institute Binyamin Appelbaum— is a Washington correspondent for The New York Times who covers the Federal Reserve and other aspects of economic policy Moderated by Eric Helland—William F. Podlich Professor of Economics and George R. Roberts Fellow at Claremont McKenna College Political Panel  – “Examining Polarization in the Supreme Court,” 10:00 – 11:15am, Freeberg Forum, Kravis Center, Lower Level, #62 The lack of consensus on the limitations of the Constitution is acutely reflected in the increasing focus on the Supreme Court to manage widening conceptions of American politics. Amanda Hollis-Brusky—Assistant Professor, Department of Politics, Pomona College. Author of Ideas With Consequences: The Federalist Society and the Conservative Counterrevolution (Oxford, 2015) Steve Teles—Associate Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University. Author of Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement: The Battle for Control of the Law (Princeton, 2008) Tom Campbell—Dean of Chapman University School of Law and former five-term member of the U.S. House of Representatives Moderated by Kenneth Miller—Associate Professor of Government at Claremont McKenna College and author of Direct Democracy and the Courts Closing remarks by Spencer Abraham, former U.S. Energy Secretary and U.S. senator from Michigan. Roundtable Discussion – “Examining the Roots of Polarization in our Constitutional Order,” 11:30 – 1 p.m., Security Pacific Dining Room, Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum Live streaming of this event will be available at www.cmc.edu. Examine the competition visions of the Constitution, how they manifest within our political parties and issues cleavages, and how they distort our politics. David Dreier—longtime chairman of the House Rules Committee, 32-year veteran of Congress and recent appointee of Secretary of State John Kerry’s Foreign Affairs Policy Board. He is a trustee and alumnus of Claremont McKenna College and distinguished fellow at the Brookings Institution Tom Campbell—Dean of Chapman University School of Law and former five-term member of the U.S. House of Representatives Thomas E. Mann—Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at The Brookings Institution and Resident Scholar, Institute of Governmental Studies, University of California, Berkeley. Mann held the W. Averell Harriman Chair at Brookings 1991-2014 and was Director of Governmental Studies from 1987 to 1999 Moderated by Zachary Courser—Research Director, Dreier Roundtable, and Visiting Assistant Professor of Government at Claremont McKenna College More information at drt.cmc.edu.


Claremont McKenna College announces two major gift sculptures from George Roberts ’66 P’93
Arts & Culture
Claremont McKenna College (CMC) announced the gift of two major sculptures from George Roberts ’66 P’93 by world-renowned artists Chris Burden and Ellsworth Kelly. The sculptures are the latest milestones in a major art and creativity initiative currently underway at Claremont McKenna. Burden’s work, Meet in the Middle, will be installed in May 2016 in front of the new Roberts Pavilion, a state-of-the-art fitness and events center for CMC and the athletic center for the Claremont-Mudd-Scripps intercollegiate, intramural, and physical education programs. The untitled Kelly piece, a unique totem sculpture, will be placed at the site of the original Story House on the campus in 2017. “CMC is a special place in the world that continues to grow and excel, and it is a privilege to contribute to the College’s new public art initiative,” Roberts says. “We have a great community and these artworks will add a new dimension to CMC’s already excellent educational environment. Public art plays a special role in our lives, and CMC students will now have art in the spaces where they study, learn, and socialize.” “We are very grateful to George Roberts for these inspiring gifts to the campus,” said Hiram Chodosh, President of Claremont McKenna College. “These extraordinary works by two great American artists will be iconic physical expressions of our deep commitment to creativity and its incalculable value in our society.” Building on the installation last year of the painter Mary Weatherford’s monumental mural From the Mountain to the Sea in the Athenaeum, “the community-feel of the Burden piece and the sheer elegance of the sky-piercing Kelly totem will provide powerful complements to a series of related art and creativity endeavors,” according to Chodosh. The Claremont McKenna Public Art Committee, Student Arts Council, which showcases the work of student artists, the Gould Center’s leadership in bringing artists, curators, and art historians to campus, the Mellon Roundtables on Creativity, Empathy, and Courage, and the new Sontag Center for Collaborative Creativity, will each “mutually reinforce and draw inspiration from the significance of the Burden and Kelly sculptures,” Chodosh concluded. The late Chris Burden, who was born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1946 and died in Topanga Canyon earlier this year, was known as an artist’s artist. Meet in the Middle, which will be installed outside of Roberts Pavilion, is a circular arrangement of eight street lamps and 24 benches. The sculpture will provide a point of focus and a recognizable meeting place. It was designed by the artist to be optimistic, welcoming, and provocative, and will provide a social setting where students and faculty can interact with the sculpture and each other. The lamps will automatically illuminate at sunset and turn off at sunrise and will be fitted with LED lights. Burden felt that these installations were about human relationships to the places we have built for ourselves: the posts and benches represent human scale, and they are more ornate than they need to be—small sculptures that dotted the streets of the past. Meet in the Middle is part of a Burden body of work utilizing vintage street lamps. Urban Light, his 2008 large-scale assemblage sculpture of 202 restored L.A. street lamps from the 1920s and ‘30s, marks the entrance to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Many observers have declared the work an L.A. icon — a beacon of hope in the often-harsh urban landscape. Urban Light has appeared in films, music videos, commercials, TV shows, and national magazines. Ellsworth Kelly has redefined abstraction in art, evading critical attempts to classify him as a color field, hard-edge or Minimalist painter, to establish himself as one of the most important artists working today. Kelly’s visual vocabulary draws from the world around him—shapes and colors found in plants, architecture, a shadow on a wall—and has been informed by his interest in the liminal space between places and objects, between his work and viewers. He has said, “In my world, I don’t want you to look at the surface; I want you to look at the form, the relationships." A totem can be defined as an object imbued with spiritual significance, a place to gather and a place to reflect. Claremont McKenna has commissioned Ellsworth Kelly to create a unique totem sculpture, made of stainless steel, painted white, and approximately 40 feet in height. Like an Egyptian obelisk, the totem will serve as both a landmark and a place for contemplation. As is the case with much of his considerable body of work, these totems take as their point of departure shapes and patterns found in the natural world. Situated within a small grove of trees, the smooth, modern form will converse with its surroundings through the juxtaposition of the natural and the man made. Rising up above its surroundings, the totem will provide a space for self-reflection, dwarfing us in the presence of the towering pillar. Kelly, who was born in Newburgh, N.Y., in 1923, lives and works in Spencertown, N.Y. Renderings of the artworks can be seen here.


Philosophy faculty members' new works explore life's questions
Faculty
Crucial questions about reality and the nature of existence and meaning -- life after death, God's existence, human identity-- receive probing, fresh treatment in several new works published this fall by  members of CMC's philosophy faculty.   The department is holding a special reception this Friday to celebrate the release of After We Die: Theology, Philosophy, and the Question of Life after Death by Stephen Davis, Persons and Personal Identity by Amy Kind, Reason in the World: Hegel's Metaphysics and Its Philosophical Appeal by James Kreines, and Christian Philosophy of Religion: Essays in Honor of Stephen T. Davis edited by C.P. Ruloff. While the new book by Davis, who is Russell K. Pitzer Professor of Philosophy, subjects a key philosophical belief -- that Christians survive death and will have a bodily resurrection in the next world -- to searching analysis, Professor of Philosophy Amy Kind provides a similarly vigorous treatment of a web of issues related to human identity and memory in this world. Associate Professor of Philosophy James Kreines' examination of one of the foundational figures of German philosophy, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, is called "controversial" by his publisher for "rejecting common commitments in existing approaches" and offering "a new interpretation of Hegel's theoretical philosophy." The career of CMC's Davis also serves as the focus of Ruloff's Christian Philosophy of Religion.  The volume's editor has collected essays in celebration of Davis' work--known in academia as a "festschrift"--by esteemed philosophers in the field, including John Hick, Charles Taliaferro, Richard Swinburne, Eleonore Stump, Anselm Min, and several others.  "Very few philosophers have had the impact of Stephen Davis on the world of Christian philosophy," says Thomas Señor of the University of Arkansas in an advance notice. The College's Philosophy Department celebration of Davis, Kind, and Kreines will be held tomorrow, Friday, from 3:30 - 5 p.m. in Kravis Center 321.  Wine and hors d'oeuvres will be served.   Read more: For more on Stephen Davis' new book at Baylor University Press: http://www.baylorpress.com/Book/448/After_We_Die.html For more on Amy Kind's book at Polity: https://www.polity.co.uk/book.asp?ref=9780745654317 For more on James Kreines' book at Oxford University Press: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/reason-in-the-world-9780190204303?cc=us&lang=en&#  For more on the celebration of Davis' philosophy at University of Notre Dame Press:  http://undpress.nd.edu/books/P03171


'Activating the Campus: Art, Architecture, and the Campus'
Arts & Culture
Sponsored by CMC’s public art committee and the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies, "Activating the Campus" will examine the relationship between art, architecture, and the campus. Internationally recognized artists, curators, and scholars will join curator and Gould Center Distinguished Visiting Fellow Philipp Kaiser and Professor Robert Faggen, director of the Gould Center and Barton Evans and H. Andrea Neves Professor of Literature, to discuss these themes and formally launch Claremont McKenna’s public art initiative. Held tomorrow night in the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum, the event begins with a 5 p.m. reception followed by dinner at 5:30 p.m.  The panel discussion will begin at 6:15 p.m. (to reserve a place at dinner, click here to visit the Athenaeum reservation site).  In addition to Kaiser and Faggen, the panelists in Wednesday night's panel are: Miwon Kwon is trained in architecture, holds a MA in photography, and has extensive curatorial experience from her tenure at the Whitney Museum of American Art in the early 1990s. She received her PhD in Architectural History and Theory at Princeton University in 1998, the same year in which she joined the faculty at the University of California, Los Angeles, to teach contemporary art history (post-1945). Her research and writings have engaged several disciplines including contemporary art, architecture, public art, and urban studies. She was a founding co-editor and publisher of Documents(1992-2004), and serves on the advisory board of the journal October. She is the author of One Place After Another: Site-Specific Art and Locational Identity (MIT Press, 2002), as well as lengthy essays on the work of many contemporary artists. Kwon recently co-organized the major historical exhibition Ends of the Earth: Land Art to 1974 with Philipp Kaiser at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Currently, she is the Chair of the Department of Art History at UCLA. Jorge Pardo was born in Havana, Cuba in 1963 and studied at the University of Illinois, Chicago, and the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Pardo is well known for his architectural spaces and design inflected works including a bookstore for the Dia Art Foundation, a restaurant for the K21 Museum, a house built as an artwork and a home for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and the re- design of the installation for the pre-Columbian collection at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Recent exhibitions include mid-career surveys at the Irish Museum of Modern Art; K21, Dusseldorf; Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland. His work is part of numerous public collections including The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Tate Modern, London. Formerly based in Los Angeles, Pardo currently lives and works in Mérida, Mexico. Oscar Tuazon was born in 1975 in Seattle and studied at the Deep Springs College, Cooper Union, and the Whitney Independent Study Program. He previously worked for Acconci Studio executing major public projects around the globe. Inspired by what the artist calls “outlaw architecture,” Tuazon’s practice blurs the lines between art and architecture and form and function. Recent exhibitions include “Oscar Tuazon: Alone In An Empty Room” at the Museum Ludwig, Cologne and “White Walls, Sensory Spaces” at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam. He has also executed major works for the 2012 Whitney Biennial and ILLUMInations, the 54th Venice Biennial in 2011. His work is a part of major collections including The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Kunsthaus Zurich, and the Saatchi Gallery Collection, London. Rochelle Steiner is a Los Angeles-based curator, writer and professor of critical studies at the Roski School of Art and Design, University of Southern California, where she served as dean from 2010-12. She was previously Director of the Public Art Fund, New York (2006-9), Chief Curator of the Serpentine Gallery, London (2001-6), and Associate Curator of Contemporary Art at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1996-2001). Steiner has curated major exhibitions and large-scale public art projects in the US, Europe and Asia, including 6 Under 60, an exhibition about emerging international cities for the 2011 Shenzhen and Hong Kong Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism, Olafur Eliasson’s The New York City Waterfalls (2008), and monographic exhibitions with John Currin, Ellsworth Kelly, Gabriel Orozco, Elizabeth Peyton, Cindy Sherman, and Rirkrit Tiravanija, among many others. Steiner received an MA and PhD in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester, New York.          


Probing new faculty works on philosophy celebrated Friday
Faculty
Crucial questions about reality and the nature of existence and meaning -- life after death, God's existence, human identity-- receive probing, fresh treatment in several new works published this fall by  members of CMC's philosophy faculty.   The department is holding a special reception this Friday to celebrate the release of After We Die: Theology, Philosophy, and the Question of Life after Death by Stephen Davis, Persons and Personal Identity by Amy Kind, Reason in the World: Hegel's Metaphysics and Its Philosophical Appeal by James Kreines, and Christian Philosophy of Religion: Essays in Honor of Stephen T. Davis edited by C.P. Ruloff. While the new book by Davis, who is Russell K. Pitzer Professor of Philosophy, subjects a key philosophical belief -- that Christians survive death and will have a bodily resurrection in the next world -- to searching analysis, Professor of Philosophy Amy Kind provides a similarly vigorous treatment of a web of issues related to human identity and memory in this world. Associate Professor of Philosophy James Kreines' examination of one of the foundational figures of German philosophy, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, is called "controversial" by his publisher for "rejecting common commitments in existing approaches" and offering "a new interpretation of Hegel's theoretical philosophy." The career of CMC's Davis also serves as the focus of Ruloff's Christian Philosophy of Religion.  The volume's editor has collected essays in celebration of Davis' work--known in academia as a "festschrift"--by esteemed philosophers in the field, including John Hick, Charles Taliaferro, Richard Swinburne, Eleonore Stump, Anselm Min, and several others.  "Very few philosophers have had the impact of Stephen Davis on the world of Christian philosophy," says Thomas Señor of the University of Arkansas in an advance notice. The College's Philosophy Department celebration of Davis, Kind, and Kreines will be held tomorrow, Friday, from 3:30 - 5 p.m. in Kravis Center 321.  Wine and hors d'oeuvres will be served.   Read more: For more on Stephen Davis' new book at Baylor University Press: http://www.baylorpress.com/Book/448/After_We_Die.html For more on Amy Kind's book at Polity: https://www.polity.co.uk/book.asp?ref=9780745654317 For more on James Kreines' book at Oxford University Press: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/reason-in-the-world-9780190204303?cc=us&lang=en&#  For more on the celebration of Davis' philosophy at University of Notre Dame Press:  http://undpress.nd.edu/books/P03171


CMS golfer Tim de Silva’s fast-paced hobby on a different type of course
Sports, Students
Watch Tim's video interview to see some pictures, see a few clips of him racing and to hear Tim talk about out another one his favorite moments on the race track:   After driving his way to the first professional win of his open-wheel racing career over the summer, Tim de Silva pulled into pit row and team members greeted him with the usual winning, post-race congratulations. For Tim, a sophomore at Claremont McKenna College who is on the Claremont-Mudd-Scripps men's golf team, winning his first Pacific Formula 2000 Series professional race carried a great deal of importance. Winning the race with the crew that his dad, Harindra, had raced with for many years and Tim had grown up around as a kid meant even more. What meant the most to Tim was winning the race with his dad there to share the moment. Not only did Harindra have the opportunity to see his son win the race, he competed in the event as well and finished two spots behind Tim for a third-place podium finish. It was the first father-son podium finish in the history of the Pacific Formula 2000 Series, according to Tim. For Tim, moments like his Formula 2000 win with his dad, epitomize why he started racing and why racing has become such an integral part of his life. "For me this all started because of my dad," Tim said. "Racing has always been something that my dad and I have done together and I very rarely do any races if he's not there driving with me. We drive in very similar classes and get to compete with each other." Currently, the two are racing in the Pacific Formula 2000 Series, a West Coast semiprofessional series that races at local tracks such as Auto Club Speedway. It is part of what's called the Mazda Road to Indy Car, just a few steps below the Indy Car Series. Tim and Harindra also race vintage cars from the 1960s and '70s and compete on the go-kart circuit from time to time. Over the last year, Tim has competed in about 10 races. Five of those races have come on the go-kart track which is where it all began for Tim, as it does for most competitive drivers. At around nine years old, Tim's interest in racing began to take shape when his dad started racing vintage cars, similar to the Italian-made 1978 Osella PA8 that Tim drives now. The father-son team also spent nearly every Sunday morning together watching Formula 1 races on television. As Tim's dad continued to race more, he realized that the best way to hone his skills were not behind the wheel of a vintage car, but rather in a go-kart. So when Tim turned 10 or 11, he and his dad began participating in go-kart racing schools together. Racing school progressed into regional go-kart competition, then national competition and by the time Tim turned 15, he began competing in Formula Mazda racing, which is a semi-professional level of open wheel racing. Tim also sprinkled in a few vintage car races into his competitive racing schedule from time to time. Tim's development as a driver continued over the years, but one thing always remained constant. He and his dad almost always raced together. "Racing with my dad is the most fun I have doing anything. I've done some races without my dad and he has done some without me," Tim said. "I'll never forget something he [Tim's dad] said when I went off to college last year. He went and did a go-kart race and called me after, because we always talk after races and he said, 'Man, it wasn't anywhere near as fun without you there.' " And Tim shares a similar sentiment about racing with his dad. "When I do a race without him, it's just not the same because we get out of the car and the first thing we do is we run over and we talk to each other about what happened in each other's race," Tim said. "And a lot of times we are racing together. I'm passing him. He's passing me. Our driving skills are very, very close, so it makes it a lot of fun." Some of the driving skills he utilizes zipping around the course at speeds upward of 150 miles per hour have helped Tim succeed in another one of his favorite sports; golf. Racing and golf are not often mentioned in the same sentence. So you may be asking yourself, what are the connections between the two sports? "There are actually, surprisingly a lot of correlations between racing and golf," Tim said. "Obviously they are both individual sports. You are part of a team in racing but you are driving for yourself, and in golf you are also part of a team but in reality you only have control over your own game. They also are both sports where there is a very finite and specific sequence of muscles that need to fire in that same sequence over and over and over and over." Tim also prepares and competes mentally in racing and golf in a similar way. "Because it [racing] is an individual sport, I can't control the way someone else is going to drive, but I can do my best and see where that puts me and it is the same thing with golf," Tim said. "I can't control what my competitors are doing but I am going to do my best, shoot the best score that I can and at the end of the day, wherever that puts me, that's where I will end up." Tim's metal approach to both sports has served him well, winning him races as a driver and making him a contributor to the CMS men's golf team, one of the top-ranked golf programs at the NCAA Division III level. With school in session and the time commitment that is associated with being a successful student-athlete as an economics and math major at one of the nation's top academic institutions, Tim doesn't get to race as much as he did during the summer. But racing is still an activity that he frequently participates in and hopes to for a long time. "Professionally, it [racing] is not something I am going to pursue because of the time and capital it takes to become a professional driver," Tim said. "I really enjoy racing and golf, but I don't want to make my living doing either of those sports." Instead, he wants to earn his degree from CMC and continue to play golf for the Stags. Once he graduates, he hopes to land a job where he can earn enough money to support himself while continuing to play golf for fun and, of course, race with dad. After all, racing without his dad and his dad without him just wouldn't be the same. It never is.


Students present a fascinating array of projects at Keck Summer Science Research Symposium
Keck Science
More than 75 highly motivated students from Claremont McKenna, Pitzer and Scripps Colleges participated in the Keck Summer Science Research Symposium held at the W.M. Keck Science Department. These symposia at Keck have been held for about a decade and are comprised entirely of student presentations of work performed in the science labs at Keck and abroad. The research was grouped into nine categories that represent all the major fields of science; everything from science on the scale of molecules to natural ecology studied in situ. The Symposium kicked off with a Poster Session which gave students a chance to meet one-on-one with the researchers to discuss and better understand their motivations and scientific findings. Afterwards, the researchers broke into smaller groups (corresponding to the nine categories) to give a more in-depth analysis into their processes and conclusions. According to Babak Sanii, assistant professor of chemistry at the Keck Science Department and one of the organizers of the Symposium, all students who performed summer research at Keck are asked to take part, as well as those who performed research off-campus that they will use towards their senior thesis. He said the process of being selected for summer research varies. “For myself, I meet with interested students from all three colleges in February and we see if my projects match their interests, then I may ask them to read a related paper so they get a better idea of the work we do, and if it's a fit then we work with our various funding agencies to get them summer positions.” For Prof. Sanii, the Symposium is a great way for faculty and students to learn about the diverse research being conducted at Keck and elsewhere. “It also gives budding researchers a sense of what is possible and it’s a rigorous presentation experience for all of our students,” Prof. Sanii said. “In fact, most students conduct practice presentations over the summer just to get ready for the Symposium.” Kristen Munoz ’17, a Chemistry and Spanish dual major at CMC wanted to gain more experience in the lab and carry out her own research project. Her participation in the Symposium began when she spoke with Prof. Sanii about the projects he supervises. She then decided to apply for a research grant through The Rose Hills Foundation. “Upon receiving the grant, I also agreed to give a presentation at the symposium about the research I conducted during the summer (Applications of membrane gradients: diffusion, phase separation, and protein binding),” she said. “So, as my summer research experience was coming to a close, my partner Chen-min (Steven) Hung and I created a poster for the work that we did in those 10 weeks and we presented at the symposium.” According to Munoz, CMC science students should not be the only ones interested in the research. “CMC is filled with brilliant people,” she said. “These students have worked so much and have put in endless hours into their projects. You'd be amazed at some of the crazy stuff that's going on in some of these labs! It's great to see the research they conducted be created into a beautifully designed poster that encapsulates all their hard work and dedication. CMC students – whether they’re in the sciences or not – will get to learn more about topics outside of what they study, and that can only be good.” Michael Swift ’16, a Biochemistry major at CMC, presented on “Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with H19 lncRNA Translation Avoidance.” Simply put, Swift hopes his research will provide insight into how to stop the progression of gastric cancer, which is highly associated with the increased presence of H19 in the cell. “The value of the symposium is essentially the same as any symposium, communication,” Swift said. “Though the work undergraduates like me have done in just one summer is not likely to be groundbreaking, it is important to learn how to communicate our findings to a variety of people: those in our particular field, a scientist in general, and especially the lay person. Additionally, since mostly seniors were presenting their research it is a good way for first years and sophomores to see that kind of research that they may end up doing in a few years.” In Swift’s view, science is a simultaneously beautiful and frustrating process that almost never works in the way people want it to. “The cleverest, most persevering scientists can always make some sense of their data, so that even in ‘failure’ we can find real results,” he said. “I think people would find that when they communicate with the young promising scientists at Keck, who will hopefully be the ones to alleviate many of society’s woes from hereditary diseases to climate change, that they would come away with more hope for the future.”   About W.M. Keck Science Department The W.M. Keck Science Department is the interdisciplinary home to the biology, chemistry, environmental science, and physics faculty for Claremont McKenna, Pitzer, and Scripps colleges. The department is administered cooperatively and is housed within an 81,000-square-foot Center, located at the intersection of the three colleges. The department offers more than a dozen discrete degree options, including dual-degree programs in partnership with schools of engineering and majors in conjunction with disciplines outside the sciences. The W.M. Keck Science Department provides comprehensive, interdisciplinary instruction in small class settings and numerous opportunities for students to conduct research. Our graduates enter a significant range of careers and enjoy acceptance into prestigious graduate research and health science programs.


Meghan Fuelling '16 honored by Danish Institute for Study Abroad
Students
Economics major Meghan Fuelling ’16 has received the Academic Excellence Award from the Danish Institute for Study Abroad (DIS) for her outstanding academic work in Denmark last Spring. Each semester DIS recognizes a few outstanding students who have distinguished themselves through diligence, commitment, academic performance, and contributed to a positive, collaborative learning environment in class.   Fuelling was recognized in DIS’s Global Economics program. Her core course (Globalization & European Economies) faculty Kristian Sørensen supported her as the recipient of the Spring semester’s Academic Award for her outstanding class participation, her intellect, and her active role during class discussions both in class and on study tours.  Read more  


Lowe & Rose Institutes to host IE Economic Forecast Conference
Citizens Business Bank Presents 6th Annual Inland Empire Economic Forecast Conference on Thursday, September 24, 2015 at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario Melissa Francis, Anchor & Host, Fox Business Network & Fox News Channel Featured Guest Speaker Will Discuss: Separating the Washington & Wall Street Economic Spin Hosted by Claremont McKenna College and the UCLA Anderson Forecast Leading Economists to Deliver Current National, State, and Inland Empire Forecasts For the sixth year, Citizens Business Bank (CBB), recently ranked a “Top 5 Bank in the U.S.” by Bank Director Magazine, is presenting the Sixth Annual Inland Empire Economic Forecast Conference on Thursday, September 24, 2015 from 7:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. at Citizens Business Bank Arena, located at 4000 East Ontario Center Parkway, Ontario. The annual conference is hosted by the Inland Empire Center for Economics and Public Policy at Claremont McKenna College (CMC), a joint venture between the Lowe Institute of Political Economy and the Rose Institute of State and Local Government of CMC, and the UCLA Anderson Forecast. “We are excited to have Melissa Francis of Fox Business Network & Fox News Channel as our featured speaker.  She will add excitement and additional real-world insight to the conference,” said Christopher D. Myers, President & Chief Executive Officer of Citizens Business Bank.  “Melissa’s perspective on the economic changes in China and the recent volatility in global stock markets should be of great interest to our clients and friends.”    Honored to be the conference’s featured guest speaker, Melissa Francis added:  “The economic climate can be hard to gauge. You need to be able to separate the Washington & Wall Street spin from the critical data that can make or break your business and your finances. We’ll break down the biggest global and national themes into tangible, actionable information, you can profit from in the real world immediately.” In addition to being an anchor and host on the Fox Business Network and Fox News Channel, Francis is a regular contributor on financial, economic, and political issues on shows such as The O’Reilly Factor, The Five, Outnumbered, and The Kelly File.    The UCLA Anderson Forecast Senior Economist, Jerry Nickelsburg, and Edward Leamer, Director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast, will present the national and California economic forecasts. Marc D. Weidenmier, Robert J. Lowe Professor of Economics and the George Roberts Faculty Research Fellow at the Robert Day School of Economics and Finance at Claremont McKenna College, Research Associate at NBER, and the Director of Lowe Institute of Political Economy, will deliver economic forecasts and economic development updates on the Inland Empire including San Bernardino and Riverside Counties. Andrew Busch, Crown Professor of Government, George R. Roberts Fellow, and Director of the Rose Institute of State and Local Government at Claremont McKenna College, notes “The Inland Empire Center is proud of this opportunity to discuss the vital issues facing the economy in the Inland Empire and beyond. This year is going to be better than ever.”   Conference Schedule: 7:00 a.m.: Registration, Breakfast and Networking 8:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.: Conference   Tickets are $75 (table of ten is $650). Space is limited. To register and for additional information, please visit, www.InlandEmpireCenter.org , or phone 909-607-7265. A select number of media and sponsorship opportunities are available; for more information, contact Marionette Moore at 909-607-7265. Presenting Sponsor: Citizens Business Bank. Platinum Sponsors: Oremor Automotive Group, KCAL-FM, KOLA-FM and KVCR TV and NPR Radio. Gold Sponsors: City of Ontario, Los Angeles Business Journal, and The Press Enterprise. Silver Sponsors: Citrus Valley Association of Realtors, County of San Bernardino, Cushman & Wakefield of California, KCAA Radio, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Parke Guptill Certified Public Accountants, and Riverside County Economic Development Agency.   About Citizens Business Bank CVB Financial Corp. is the holding company for Citizens Business Bank. The Bank is the largest financial institution headquartered in the Inland Empire region of Southern California with assets of approximately $7.7 billion. Citizens Business Bank serves 43 cities with 40 Business Financial Centers, seven Commercial Banking Centers, and three trust office locations serving the Inland Empire, Los Angeles County, Orange County, San Diego County, Ventura County, and the Central Valley areas of California. Shares of CVB Financial Corp. common stock are listed on the NASDAQ under the ticker symbol “CVBF.” For investor information on CVB Financial Corp., visit our Citizens Business Bank website at www.cbbank.com and click on the “Investors” tab.   About Claremont McKenna College Claremont McKenna College (CMC) is a highly selective, independent liberal arts college with a unique real world mission.  As a member of The Claremont Colleges, CMC’s dynamic programs and eminent teacher-scholars develop students into leaders in the private, public, and social sectors. Located on a beautiful residential campus east of Los Angeles, the College offers generous scholarship and financial aid, and rigorous, broad academic training in the social sciences, sciences, and the humanities, with a widely recognized expertise in economics and government. The college achieves its distinctive mission of producing responsible leaders by providing a community ethos that is committed to collaboration and the free exchange of ideas, nationally recognized athletic programs, and rich opportunities for advanced research, real world experience, and internships through student-led enterprises and 11 research institutes. www.cmc.edu.   About UCLA Anderson Forecast UCLA Anderson Forecast is one of the most widely watched and often-cited economic outlooks for California and the nation and was unique in predicting both the seriousness of the early-1990s downturn in California and the strength of the state's rebound since 1993. More recently, the Forecast was credited as the first major U.S. economic forecasting group to declare the recession of 2001. www.uclaforecast.com.   # # #  


Summer-Fall Rankings Roundup
Higher Education
  U.S. News & World Report U.S. News & World Report today released its 2016 edition of Best Colleges on September 9th, ranking Claremont McKenna College No. 9 in the “Best National Liberal Arts Colleges” list. CMC is tied in ninth-place with Davidson College and the United States Naval Academy. Additional results for CMC in the U.S. News rankings include: sixth in Faculty Resources; seventh in Student Selectivity; ninth among High School Counselors; 10th in Graduation and Retention rates; 13th in Financial Resources; and 17th in Alumni Giving. CMC is also included on U.S. News’ rankings for “Best Value Schools,” “Best Colleges for Veterans,” “Campus Ethnic Diversity,” “Economic Diversity,” and “Most International Students.” View the complete U.S. News rankings of the 245 national liberal arts colleges here. The U.S. News National Universities rankings can be found here.   Princeton Review In August, the Princeton Review released the 2016 edition of The Best 380 Colleges.  In the following categories, the Princeton Review ranked Claremont McKenna:  first in “Best-Run Colleges,” and “Their Students Love These Colleges;” second in “Most Accessible Professors” and “Top Internship Opportunities;” third in “Best Career Services,” “Best Quality of Life” and “Happiest Students;” fourth in “Best Classroom Experience,” “Easiest Campus to Get Around” and “Lots of Race/Class Interaction;” and sixth in “Best Financial Aid.” CMC was also included in Princeton Review’s list of “Best Campus Food,” “Most Politically Active Students;” “Professors Get High Marks” and “Top 50 - Colleges That Pay You Back.” View the full Princeton Review Best 380 Colleges here.    The Active Times CMC was ranked second on The Active Times’ “50 Fittest Colleges in America” in August. Factors considered in the ranking included looking at the data of America’s top colleges and universities in addition to considering all aspects of fitness, health and wellness from the quality of and enthusiasm for a school's sports programs and its campus dining options, to the quality of health and safety on campus. View the full list of the 50 Fittest Colleges in America from The Active Times here.   Forbes Forbes came out with their annual rankings in July.  In their “Top 25 Best Liberal Arts Colleges” list, Claremont McKenna College ranked #6 and in Forbes’ “America’s Top Colleges Ranking,” CMC ranked #18 out of 650 schools. The full list of Forbes’ Top Colleges can be viewed here.   Best Colleges Best Colleges released its 2015 ranking in June. CMC was ranked first in “Lowest Student Loan Default Rates” among national private schools. Additional results from Best Colleges include second for “Best Four-Year Colleges in California.” You can see CMCs full rankings and methodologies here: https://www.cmc.edu/outcomes/rankings.  


$25 Million Gift Establishes Center for Creativity and Collaboration for the 5Cs
Campus Life, Education,

Defying routine at CMC (Part 1): Blending creativity with innovation
President
As colleges and universities open their doors for a new academic year, a recent commentary in The Chronicle of Higher Education sounds a discouraging note. Today, writes Stephen Herr in “It’s Harder Now to Change Students’ Lives, but No Less Important,” students are encountering curricula and programming that are “becoming ever more routinized.”  He likens much of the world of higher education to the fast-food industry. “Fast-food nation and higher education are becoming ever more homogeneous,” says Herr, a former department chair at Lange College, “and it’s not surprising that students are less engaged. Why should they be? Generic only goes so far.” This fall, however, as some 1,200 students begin a new academic season at Claremont McKenna College, they will find new and established programming intended to avoid the bleak landscape that Herr describes. Interdisciplinary study and collaboration have long been the hallmarks of the CMC experience; and this has become an especially energized focus of Hiram Chodosh’s administration since his presidency started in 2013. The following report provides a brief selective survey and overview of the principles and key programs at CMC aimed at building cross-curricular synergies and fostering creativity that defies becoming routinized.   Part 1—CMC’s innovative ethos; Mellon Faculty Roundtables   The curriculum at any college or university, educators says, should never become moribund. As academic lifeblood, it must be continually reassessed and renewed with an eye toward infusing new course creativity and innovative teaching techniques into the established structure. CMC believes that the idea of how teachers conduct classes goes hand in hand with exactly what is taught—a synergy that pays academic dividends to instructors and students alike. To that end, the College has made creativity and innovation a hallmark of acquiring a liberal arts education here for all of its students. For Lee Skinner, Associate Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures and an Associate Dean of the Faculty, creative teaching also requires creativity on the part of students. “As faculty, we can, and should, push our students to excel by developing courses and teaching methodologies that inspire our students to think critically,” she says. “Critical thinking is creative thinking,” Skinner continues. “Students must be willing to think deeply and in new ways in order to meet challenges in and outside the classroom. We want to embed these practices in our students to help nurture the next generation of thoughtful, responsible global citizens who will work to improve their communities by exploring new avenues and possibilities to entrenched difficulties.” Last fall, the College was selected to receive a Mellon Foundation New President’s Grant—a three-year, $100,000 award that permits premier faculty, via a series of roundtable think-tanks, to examine new ways to challenge students and expand their learning capabilities. The grant has funded a number of new courses (to be developed this coming year) that will focus on all or some of the three qualities of “Creativity, Empathy and Courage” (the Mellon Foundation theme). The grant is a source of immense potential for faculty, explains Ron Riggio, also an Associate Dean of the Faculty at CMC. “This Mellon initiative focuses directly on how we can foster creativity, innovation, empathy, and courage in our students in deeper and more meaningful ways,” says Riggio, who is also Henry R. Kravis Professor of Leadership and Organizational Psychology. “With the pace of technological change and the need for solutions to societal problems, creativity and innovation are critically important, and it is imperative that we foster this in our students via the classroom and co-curricular experiences,” says Riggio. “Many of our students are entrepreneurial and it is important to help them nurture and develop their creative thinking and ideas. We do this throughout the curriculum. That's a hallmark of the liberal arts.” The Mellon grant amplifies and echoes similar dynamics demonstrated by CMC’s longstanding Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) major, one of the oldest, most successful cross-disciplinary programs in the college’s history. PPE originated in the 1970s. Part 2—Key Programs and Organizations


“Civil Wars and Deanship” is keynote theme at CMC Convocation
Faculty
  Hundreds of students and faculty came together last Friday in McKenna Auditorium during CMC’s 69th Convocation Ceremony to kick-off the school year with speeches and song and to honor CMCers for years of service and achievement. To President Chodosh, convocation creates a moment to recharge purpose, rededicate to learning and offers an opportunity to be mindful that the quality of our intellect, our behavior and our shared sense of community are central to our broader purpose and success. “So in this moment – whether we are stuck or transformative – depends on each of us and what we can learn,” he said. “CMC is dedicated to grappling with the major questions confronting our civilization – to get things done for ourselves and society around us.” The Convocation’s Keynote Address “Civil Wars and Deanship: Parallels and Insights,” was delivered by Peter Uvin, the newly appointed Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty.  Uvin spent nearly two decades working in Africa chiefly in the areas of conflict prevention and democracy rights. During that time he was involved in trying to find resolutions to civil wars and conflicts in Burundi, Rwanda, Chad and Niger, among other countries. After acknowledging the key differences between civil wars and academic communities, Uvin discussed how the causes or deeper drivers of civil wars, as well as the solutions to them, are similar to the challenges of managing a college or university. He said that the things that can and do frequently go wrong in higher education are fundamentally nearly identical to those that go wrong in countries at war. He enumerated that the five signposts that will guide him at CMC are remarkably similar to those that guided him in his conflict resolution work in Africa. Shared sense of community  “One of the key factors in the civil wars I have worked in is the fundamental absence of a shared sense of community: there were always significant groups of people who deeply felt that some category of others just did not belong in their country, town, or neighborhood. … In my own discipline, I have seen—and been part of—departments that have been so profoundly divided between people who used quantitative and qualitative methods that they could not hold a normal faculty meeting anymore and thought of each member of the other group as an enemy. Much of my job here, as in Africa, is to find ways to include, to re-humanize, to rebuild community where it broke down.”  Legitimate institutions “… If there is one thing I have learned from my work as a scholar and practitioner, it is that institutions are fragile things. Institutions have formal elements—rules, offices and officers—and informal ones—expectations, beliefs, and habits. Both take a long time to emerge and, unfortunately, both are easily destroyed. It is especially the informal parts that matter for the health of institutions: we can keep the buildings and the accounts and the rules in the books, but once people stop believing in the values of the institution, the real, de facto institution will rapidly move away from the formal, de jure one. This holds true for colleges and universities as well.”  Predictability “One of the core factors that undermine institutions, eating away at their legitimacy, is a lack of predictability —and that holds for countries in Africa as much as for colleges and universities in the U.S. It is at the very heart of nearly every situation of civil war I have ever seen.” Relish difference “My fourth signpost points to the difficulty, beauty and absolute imperative of being able to work across differences. I have learned, in peace-building and really in any form of social change, that the key to sustainable success is the capability to include the difficult people, the negative forces, the ones you don’t understand or share nothing with. “ Respect “Finally, I am coming to the most important signpost in my life.  R-e-s-p-e-c-t. It is the immediate corollary of much of what I have talked about so far—sense of community, the relishing of difference, the legitimacy of institutions. A good society is a society whose institutions and practices do not humiliate its members. This holds for a college as much as for a country. Blows to people’s sense of dignity and self-respect are the core source of unhappiness in this world. “   Underscoring Chodosh’s and Uvin’s remarks, ASCMC President William W. Su ’16 challenged students, faculty and administrators at CMC to be more courageous. “Why do we need courage today?  I think our institution is in the midst of great change that requires us to go above and beyond,” Su said. “Themes of personal and social responsibility and concepts like changemaking have saturated our conversations for far too long, and our next big step is to take action. It is time to take responsibility. It is time to take the future of our institution into our own hands. Our liberal arts education prides itself on developing critical thinking. Now is the time to put the liberal arts in action and act with courage.” Su challenged attendees to exit their comfort zones and seek greatness in discomfort; to choose courses and work not for the ease, but for the rigor and to satisfy particular curiosities.    CMC faculty and staff honored at Convocation, included: 25 Years Service •    Sven Arndt, the Charles M. Stone Professor of Money, Credit, and Trade •    John Farrell, Professor of Literature •    Cynthia Humes P’15, Associate Vice President and Chief Technology Officer and Associate Professor of Religious Studies •    Joseph Bessette, the Alice Tweed Tuohy Professor of Government and Ethics  •    Rafael Huereca, a building attendant to different CMC residence halls, who now works in the W. M. Keck Science Center 30 Years of Service •    Robin Aspinall, the Vice President for Business and Administration and Treasurer •    Teresa Ruiz, Housekeeping Supervisor •    John Faranda ’79, Vice President and Ambassador-at-Large  35 Years of Service •    Teresa Hidalgo, Senior Assistant and Assistant Secretary of the College in the Office of the Board of Trustees, Office of the General Counsel and Office of Administration and Planning •    Nicholas O. Warner, Professor of Literature  •    Marc Massoud P’89, Robert A. Day Distinguished Professor of Accounting  45 Years of Service •    Stephen Davis the Russell K. Pitzer Professor of Philosophy Faculty Recognition •    Prof. Nicholas O. Warner is awarded the Presidential Award for Merit •    Profs. Amy L. Kind and Daniel A. Krauss are awarded the Dean’s Distinguished Service Award •    Prof. Roderic A. Camp is awarded the Roy P. Crocker Award for Merit •    Prof. Giorgi Areshidze is awarded the Glenn R. Huntoon Award for Superior Teaching •    Prof. Paul E. Hurley is awarded the G. David Huntoon Senior Teaching Award New Faculty •    Henri Cole, Professor of Literature •    Stacey Doan, Assistant Professor of Psychology •    Andrew Finley, Assistant Professor of Economics •    William Lincoln, Assistant Professor of Economics •    Daniel Livesay, Assistant Professor of History •    Rory Spence, Assistant Professor of Biology •    Sharda Umanath, Assistant Professor of Psychology •    Jamel Velji, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies •    Angela Vossmeyer, Assistant Professor of Economics •    William Walkenbach, Assistant Professor of Physical Education 2015 Exceptional Service Awards •    Deborah Johnson P’03, Web Content Manager, Office of Public Affairs and Communications •    Dianna Graves ’98, Director of Academic Planning, Office of the Dean of the Faculty ##    


Defying Routine at CMC (Part 2): Where innovation intersects with creative self-expression
Campus Life
  More is required than a powerful ethos and faculty inspiration to effect change on any college campus; there must be plenty of platforms and venues where these ideas can be implemented and tested. At CMC, several organizations/institutes on campus seek to engender and promote innovation and creativity—among them are the CIE (Center for Innovation  & Entrepreneurship), the Center for Civic Engagement, the Arts Council, the Kravis Leadership Institute, the Kravis Prize, and the Robert Day School through its curriculum and jointly-sponsored workshops with CIE in the entrepreneurship arena. The CMC Arts Council, which was founded in 2012 under the auspices of the ASCMC administration, serves as a student voice to promote the arts on campus. After the first year under the umbrella of ASCMC, the Art Council became an independent student-run organization whose aim is to increase the presence of art on campus—exploring a multitude of mediums—wherever possible. Last year, the Arts Council presented artwork created by CMC artists, including works of photography, painting and more and displayed at the Athenaeum.  In a further effort to foster CMC talent, the Council helped student musicians, singers, poets and artists find a rehearsal and performance venue—The Cave—located in the basement of Marks Hall. Along with artistic expression, the College also established a venue for lively (and civil) debate with The Current, a program encouraging discussions between students and faculty on a range of timely, relevant topics, ranging from the U.S. government shutdown to the future of peace in the Middle East. Under President Chodosh’s leadership, the College has also invested in more teaching grants to “flip” classrooms and integrate technology and find new ways, for example, of teaching economics to ensure that coursework remains topical, relevant, and meaningful. *** A nexus of topicality and relevance is provided by the Kravis Leadership Institute (KLI), one of the cornerstones of CMC and a leading academic center for the promotion and understanding of responsible, innovative leadership and provides unique opportunities for CMC students to develop as outstanding real world leaders in the public, private and social sectors.  KLI and the Kravis Prize—which provides a $250,000 annual award to emerging leaders in the nonprofit sector—have partnered in numerous ways to promote student learning with social impact. That effort includes summer internships with Kravis Prize recipient organizations, as well as KLI’s offering of three research fellowship programs for CMC students which support, encourage, and expand the ongoing leadership research of CMC students. Next:  Read Part 3--Ignoring the Stigma of Failure      


Defying Routine at CMC (Part 3): Ignoring the Stigma of Failure
Entrepreneurship
The undergraduate years are a pivotal time when students are encouraged not only to try new things, but also to recognize an important fact:  Mistakes are necessary on the road to new ideas and self-discovery.   That principle motivates some of the most successful entrepreneurs, and it also serves as a guiding principle behind one of CMC’s central hubs for innovation, the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CIE), which was designed with students in mind and with the hope to foster an entrepreneurial spirit at the Claremont Colleges through creativity, initiative, collaboration and impact.   “What I’ve observed over the past few years is that student engagement in the entrepreneurship/innovation area is team-oriented and cross-disciplinary, which leverages the strength of a liberal arts education and a residential experience, says Janet Smith, Von Tobel Professor of Economics at CMC. “The student teams that work on entrepreneurial projects, for example, tend to form organically and comprise students from a variety of majors—philosophy and public policy, computer science, economics-accounting, etc.”   The CIE offers mentoring by alumni and advisory board members, pitch competitions, an annual 7-C start-up fair, workshops on such topics as how to generating ideas for new ventures, how to finance a new venture, how to develop a marketing strategy for a new venture, etc.    In May the CIE hosted the CMC Angel Summit to encourage more engagement of alumni interested in working with and financing ventures by current students and young alumni.    The five-person student leadership team at the CIE is planning a 5-C “Wildfire” Tech Conference for the fall which will offer students the opportunity to learn about the frontier of technology via VR (virtual reality) demos, 3D printing applications, an array of speakers, and a networking event for all attendees.   “There is tremendous support for students and faculty to try new things without the stigma of failing,” Smith adds. “Failing is understandably an important part of learning, and an important part of the innovative process.”   Connected with the CIE is The Vanguard, an online magazine that offers CMC students a chance to research and write about new technology and innovation from their perspective.    The publication has struck a chord as the number of “hits” to the site (http://www.thevanguardmag.com/) has been rising dramatically since publication.   Next: Part 4 -- The Alumni Factor  


Photos of Mid-Quad Renovations
Architecture, Campus Life



Welcome Back
Students
Dear CMC Community: I hope you enjoyed a rejuvenating and productive summer. I’m thrilled to welcome all of you back to campus, especially our extraordinary incoming class of 2019 and transfer students, our outstanding new dean of the faculty, Peter Uvin, and superb group of new faculty and coaches. We look forward to seeing you at our Convocation on Friday at 1 p.m. in McKenna Auditorium. I’m also eager to tell you more about the important preparation for this new academic year: Our increasingly sustainable, brown-is-the-new-green campus greets everyone with the completion of the gorgeous Mid-Quad dorm renovations and expansions, the stunning progress on the Roberts Pavilion, and much more. We continue to infuse strategic value into our programs with the first nine curriculum-enhancing grants stemming from Mellon Roundtables on creativity, empathy, and courage; enhancements of the Robert Day Scholars program, new funding in support of Ashoka U Changemaker Campus student programs, and many other initiatives. We are very close to reaching our initial $100m fundraising goal for financial aid and scholarships under The Student Imperative, and we surpassed each of our annual fundraising goals last year. The collaboration of our RAs and ASCMC leadership and our Personal and Social Responsibility Strategy group finalized a strategic framework for high-risk alcohol and drug use with an emphasis on responsible moderation. We look forward to an engaging year of special events, including our second ImpactCMC weekend, several academic conferences on religious liberty, political polarization, public art, and other important issues, and a remarkable lineup for the Athenaeum that includes Michael McConnell, Nina Tandon, Wajahat Ali, Elaine Ostrander, David Sedaris, and many more. Thank you for everything you have done to contribute to our accomplishments and exciting plans for the future. I wish you all a terrific start to the school year. All the very best, Hiram


Defying routine: Blending creativity with innovation at CMC
President
As colleges and universities open their doors for a new academic year, a recent commentary in The Chronicle of Higher Education sounds a discouraging note. Today, writes Stephen Herr in “It’s Harder Now to Change Students’ Lives, but No Less Important,” students are encountering curricula and programming that are “becoming ever more routinized.” http://chronicle.com/article/It-s-Harder-Now-to-Change/232037/ He likens much of the world of higher education to the fast-food industry. “Fast-food nation and higher education are becoming ever more homogeneous,” says Herr, a former department chair at Lange College, “and it’s not surprising that students are less engaged. Why should they be? Generic only goes so far.” This fall, however, as some 1,200 students begin a new academic season at Claremont McKenna College, they will find new and established programming intended to avoid the bleak landscape that Herr describes. Interdisciplinary study and collaboration have long been the hallmarks of the CMC experience; and this has become an especially energized focus of Hiram Chodosh’s administration since his presidency started in 2013. The following report provides a brief selective survey and overview of the principles and key programs at CMC aimed at building cross-curricular synergies and fostering creativity that defies becoming routinized. Part 1—CMC’s innovative ethos; Mellon Faculty Roundtables The curriculum at any college or university, educators says, should never become moribund. As academic lifeblood, it must be continually reassessed and renewed with an eye toward infusing new course creativity and innovative teaching techniques into the established structure. CMC believes that the idea of how teachers conduct classes goes hand in hand with exactly what is taught—a synergy that pays academic dividends to instructors and students alike. To that end, the College has made creativity and innovation a hallmark of acquiring a liberal arts education here for all of its students. For Lee Skinner, Associate Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures and an Associate Dean of the Faculty, creative teaching also requires creativity on the part of students. “As faculty, we can, and should, push our students to excel by developing courses and teaching methodologies that inspire our students to think critically,” she says. “Critical thinking is creative thinking,” Skinner continues. “Students must be willing to think deeply and in new ways in order to meet challenges in and outside the classroom. We want to embed these practices in our students to help nurture the next generation of thoughtful, responsible global citizens who will work to improve their communities by exploring new avenues and possibilities to entrenched difficulties.” Last fall, the College was selected to receive a Mellon Foundation New President’s Grant—a three-year, $100,000 award that permits premier faculty, via a series of roundtable think-tanks, to examine new ways to challenge students and expand their learning capabilities. The grant has funded a number of new courses (to be developed this coming year) that will focus on all or some of the three qualities of “Creativity, Empathy and Courage” (the Mellon Foundation theme). The grant is a source of immense potential for faculty, explains Ron Riggio, also an Associate Dean of the Faculty at CMC. “This Mellon initiative focuses directly on how we can foster creativity, innovation, empathy, and courage in our students in deeper and more meaningful ways,” says Riggio, who is also Henry R. Kravis Professor of Leadership and Organizational Psychology. “With the pace of technological change and the need for solutions to societal problems, creativity and innovation are critically important, and it is imperative that we foster this in our students via the classroom and co-curricular experiences,” says Riggio. “Many of our students are entrepreneurial and it is important to help them nurture and develop their creative thinking and ideas. We do this throughout the curriculum. That's a hallmark of the liberal arts.” The Mellon grant amplifies and echoes similar dynamics demonstrated by CMC’s longstanding Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) major, one of the oldest, most successful cross-disciplinary programs in the college’s history. PPE originated in the 1970s. Coming Next: Part 2—Key Programs and Organizations


CMS Director of Athletics Mike Sutton to step down after 2015-16 academic year
Faculty
Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Director of Athletics Michael Sutton (CMC ’76) is stepping down from his current position as athletic director at the completion of the 2015-16 academic year, Claremont McKenna College President Hiram E. Chodosh has announced. Sutton has accepted a new position with the College beginning on July 1, 2016. “I am pleased to announce an important transition in the leadership of Claremont McKenna College,” Chodosh said. “To aid in CMC’s continued commitment to intercollegiate athletics, I have asked Mike, after the completion of the 2015-16 academic year, to assist the CMC development, public affairs, and alumni and parent relations offices with many important outreach projects for CMS Athletics.” Sutton, the William B. Arce Professor and George R. Roberts Fellow for Claremont McKenna College, is making the move after 35 years with CMS Athletics as a head coach and for the last 15 years as an administrator. “I am very pleased about the opportunity that I am going to have to serve the College going forward,” said Sutton. “In this new position I am going to have an expanded role in connecting our alumni with CMS Athletics and the College, and I am greatly looking forward to this new challenge as we continue to add value to the experiences our student-athletes and alumni have.” In his current role as athletic director, Sutton has been instrumental in leading a consistent rise of CMS Athletics on a national level. CMS has long been considered a conference and regional power based on the success of its teams on the field and its student-athletes in the classroom. Under Sutton’s guidance, CMS has continued its overall success on the conference level. CMS has won 26 Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference All-Sports Trophies in the last 30 years. CMS has also greatly improved the program’s standing nationally within the elite group of NCAA Division III peers, as well as the academic and post-graduate success of our outstanding student-athletes. The 2014-15 academic year concluded with CMS Athletics ranked 11th nationally out of 450 institutions – CMS’ highest finish ever – in the NCAA Division III Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup standings, which ranks athletic programs based on the success of its teams in NCAA postseason play. The Athenas and Stags have now finished in the top-25 nationally five consecutive times. This is the eighth-straight school year that CMS has improved on or tied its mark from the previous year during Sutton’s time as A.D. CMS is now also the highest rated program in the West Region. Sutton’s vision for CMS Athletics has benefited hundreds of Athenas and Stags over the years and many other students at Claremont McKenna, Harvey Mudd, and Scripps Colleges. That vision includes a lengthy list of major contributions: the growth of women’s sports at CMS; the continued improvement of CMC and CMS’s athletic facilities with the construction of the Biszantz Family Tennis Center and Roberts Pavilion; and the expansion of the intramural and physical education programs available to students, faculty, and staff at the CMS colleges. He has hired and mentored 22 head coaches over the last 15 years including seven highly successful head coaches who have coached at CMS for more than 10 years and he has also added assistant coaching positions and other important staff positions within the department. Before his success as athletic director, Sutton, as a head coach, led the Stags to an unprecedented 33 conference championships in 21 years as head coach of the men’s swim and water polo programs. He also led the Stags swim program to six national runner-up finishes and 10 top-5 finishes on the national level. Aside from his time in Claremont, Sutton served as team leader of the 1992 United States Olympic water polo team.


100th anniversary of Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken" with Prof. Robert Faggen on NPR
Faculty
CMC’s Barton Evans and H. Andrea Neves Professor of Literature, Robert Faggen, was a guest on NPR’s Diane Rehm Show Thursday, Aug. 20. The show was dedicated to the 100th anniversary of Robert Frost’s poem, “The Road Not Taken.” A noted Robert Frost scholar, Professor Faggen is co-editor of “The Letters of Robert Frost, Vol. 1,” editor of “The Notebooks of Robert Frost” and author of “Robert Frost and the Challenge of Darwin.” For the interview, Professor Faggen was joined by New York Times columnist David Orr, who recently published “The Road Not Taken: Finding America in the Poem Everyone Loves and Almost Everyone Gets Wrong,” and Frost biographer Jay Parini, poet, novelist, professor of English and creative writing at Middlebury College and author of “Robert Frost: A Life.” The Diane Rehm Show has a weekly on-air audience of more than 2.4 million and is produced by WAMU 88.5 at American University and distributed by NPR to nearly 200 stations across the country. The program is also distributed by NPR Worldwide, SiriusXM Radio and the Armed Forces Network. Listen to the interview with Professor Faggen.


Passings: Mary Dell Pritzlaff, 1929-2015
Obituary, Trustees
Longtime CMC trustee and political activist Mary Dell Olin Pritzlaff P’76, whose family's philanthropy has touched multiple aspects of CMC’s growth and mission, passed away in July in Montecito. She was 85. Mrs. Pritzlaff served as a member of the CMC Board of Trustees from 1980 until 1998: her son John Pritzlaff III ’76 joined the Board in the year his mother stepped down, thus continuing a Pritzlaff presence on CMC’s Board for 35 years. Mrs. Pritzlaff’s board tenure spanned a period of expansion and transition for the College, including: the first graduating female students or “pioneers” in 1980; the renaming of Claremont Men’s College as Claremont McKenna College in 1981; and the College’s ongoing rise to prominence on the national higher education scene. But Mrs. Pritzlaff's commitments to service also extended far beyond the CMC campus and included many educational, cultural, and scientific organizations as well as the world of politics. A wide-ranging commitment to service Born August 15, 1929, in Alton, Illinois, Mary Dell Olin was a daughter of Ann and Spencer Truman Olin, an executive of the Olin Corporation. A graduate of Briarcliff College, she met young aspiring politician John C. Pritzlaff Jr. in 1948. Pritzlaff was a Princeton graduate who joined his family's Milwaukee-based hardware business before becoming involved in Wisconsin politics as the state treasurer of the Republican Party. The couple (see photo, above) married in 1951 and left Wisconsin to settle in Arizona in 1958. During their 54-year marriage, Mrs. Pritzlaff supported her husband in his successful bids for both the Arizona House of Representatives and Senate and in his diplomatic role as Ambassador to Malta, G.C., appointed by President Nixon to serve 1969-1972. Recalling her husband's early campaigns, she told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in 2005 how Arizona’s politicos identified her husband’s political viability right away. “When we took up residence in Arizona,” she recalled, “several people in the legislature came to him and asked him to run.” In addition to her political and ambassadorial support roles, Mrs. Pritzlaff was widely active in Arizona politics, in particular as co-chair of the 1980 campaign to re-elect Barry Goldwater to the U.S. Senate. She also chaired the Board of Directors of the Barry and Peggy Goldwater Center for Democracy. Over the years Mrs. Pritzlaff's numerous other leadership roles included serving as trustee at Washington University, St. Louis; director at the Spencer T. and Ann W. Olin Foundation; president of the Phoenix Art Museum and of Saint Luke's Hospital (including the hospital's Cancer Board and Arthritis Center); establishing teaching fellowships at various schools and colleges; and breeding and training Hackney ponies, which reflects her own achievements as an accomplished equestrian. She was recognized as The Phoenix Woman of the Year in 1978. In the new book Waging War on Cancer: Dr. Pettit's Lifelong Quest to Find Cures (2015), author Robert S. Byars describes how Mrs. Pritzlaff frequently provided embattled oncologist Robert Pettit with funding when university budget cuts threatened to shut down his research on anti-tumor compounds and therapies. “Black Friday threatened to cripple us, for it cut our operating budget off at the knees,” Pettit told Byars about struggling to meet payroll at the Cancer Research Institute at ASU, “but Mary Dell Pritzlaff, who had helped us many times earlier, came to the rescue again.” A CMC Legacy Mrs. Pritzlaff and her family are one of CMC’s leading legacy families, establishing themselves as benefactors across a multitude of departments and needs. Their support has resulted in the establishing of several scholarships and funds to assist scholars and scholar-athletes (including the John Pritzlaff International Scholarship and the Pritzlaff Championship Travel Fund). Mrs. Pritzlaff demonstrated her love of sports and athletic competition at CMC by supporting the Claremont-Mudd-Scripps (CMS) soccer program and the construction of John Pritzlaff Field (including scoreboard), which serves as the prime venue for CMS Soccer's preeminent teams. Pritzlaff Field is also the location of the central event on the College's spring calendar, CMC’s annual Commencement ceremony. Mrs. Pritzlaff and her family also belong to a small handful of key supporters critical in the building of the Biszantz Family Tennis Center, which has become the NCAA’s choice venue for conference championships, and in the construction of Stark Residence Hall.For her devotion to the College, Mrs. Pritzlaff was inducted into the CMC Alumni Association as an honorary life member. Mary Dell Pritzlaff is survived by her childrenAnn (Fife) Symington SCR ’74; John (Satya) Pritzlaff, III ’76, Barbara (Doug) Pierce; and Richard Pritzlaff; ten grandchildren and eight great grandchildren; her sisters, Barbara (David) Taylor P’04 GP’12 and Judy Higgins; and nineteen nieces and nephews. A memorial service for Mary Dell Pritzlaff will be held September 26 at 10 a.m. at St. Barnabas on the Desert Episcopal Church, 6715 North Mockingbird Lane, Paradise Valley, Arizona (reception following).


Jack Pitney's new book explores a contested spectrum
Books, Faculty
With autism a contentious and growing concern in America, Professor Jack Pitney has published the first book to focus exclusively on the politics of this complex diagnosis. In The Politics of Autism: Navigating the Contested Spectrum (2015), Pitney traces the evolution of autism into a heated political issue marked by disputes over its very definition and the emergence of a confusing mishmash of policies at the federal, state and local levels. Policies which often only frustrate the people they are supposed to help. In exploring these complex issues, Pitney looks at how public policy is made and enacted and how effective policies for America’s autism community can be forged.  Pitney is the Roy P. Crocker Professor of American Politics at CMC. Learn more about The Politics of Autism and see Pitney’s Autism Policy and Politics blog at http://www.autismpolicyblog.com/ Look for an excerpt from the book in the Fall issue of CMC magazine.


Professors Sinha and Shelton added to PPE program
Economics, Philosophy, Fox News' Melissa Francis featured guest speaker at Lowe & Rose Institutes IE Economic Forecast Conference
Sixth Annual Inland Empire Economic Forecast Conference to be Held on Thursday, September 24, 2015 at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario Melissa Francis, Anchor & Host, Fox Business Network & Fox News Channel Featured Guest Speaker Presented by Citizens Business Bank Hosted by Claremont McKenna College and The UCLA Anderson Forecast Leading Economists Present Breaking News With National, State and Inland Empire Forecasts Updates on San Bernardino and Riverside Counties’ Economic Development Tickets are now available for the Sixth Annual Inland Empire Economic Forecast Conference on Thursday, September 24, 2015 from 7:00 am to 10:15 am at Citizens Business Bank Arena, located at 4000 East Ontario Center Parkway, Ontario. The sixth annual conference is presented by Citizens Business Bank and hosted by the Inland Empire Center for Economics and Public Policy at Claremont McKenna College (CMC), a joint venture between the Lowe Institute of Political Economy and the Rose Institute of State and Local Government of CMC, and the UCLA Anderson Forecast. Tickets are $75 (table of ten is $650). Space is limited. To register and for additional information, please visit, www.InlandEmpireCenter.org , or phone 909-607-7572. A select number of media and sponsorship opportunities are available; for more information, contact Marionette Moore at 909-607-7572. Attendees can look forward to hearing what Melissa Francis, the conference’s featured guest speaker, has to say about the economy from her national perspective. In addition to being an anchor and host on the Fox Business Network and Fox News Channel, she is a regular contributor on financial, economic, and political issues on shows such as The O’Reilly Factor, The Five, Outnumbered, and The Kelly File. Conference Schedule: 7:00 am: Registration, Breakfast and Networking 8:00 am to 10:15 am: Conference UCLA Anderson Forecast Senior Economist, Jerry Nickelsburg, will present the national and California forecasts. Marc D. Weidenmier, Robert J. Lowe Professor of Economics and the George Roberts Faculty Research Fellow at the Robert Day School of Economics and Finance at Claremont McKenna College, Research Associate at NBER, and the Director of Lowe Institute of Political Economy, will deliver economic forecasts and economic development updates on the Inland Empire including San Bernardino and Riverside Counties. Andrew Busch, Crown Professor of Government, George R. Roberts Fellow, and Director of the Rose Institute of State and Local Government at Claremont McKenna College, notes “The Inland Empire Center is excited about this opportunity to discuss the vital issues facing the economy in the Inland Empire and beyond. This is the sixth year of the conference, and it is going to be better than ever.” Presenting Sponsor: Citizens Business Bank. Platinum Sponsor: Oremor Automotive Group. Gold Sponsor: Los Angeles Business Journal. Silver Sponsors: Citrus Valley Association of Realtors and Parke Guptill and Company, LLP. About Citizens Business Bank CVB Financial Corp. is the holding company for Citizens Business Bank. The Bank is the largest financial institution headquartered in the Inland Empire region of Southern California with assets of approximately $7.70 billion. Citizens Business Bank serves 43 cities with 40 Business Financial Centers, seven Commercial Banking Centers, and three trust office locations serving the Inland Empire, Los Angeles County, Orange County, San Diego County, Ventura County, and the Central Valley areas of California. Shares of CVB Financial Corp. common stock are listed on the NASDAQ under the ticker symbol “CVBF.” For investor information on CVB Financial Corp., visit our Citizens Business Bank website at www.cbbank.com and click on the “Investors” tab. About Claremont McKenna College Claremont McKenna College (CMC) is a highly selective, independent liberal arts college with a unique real world mission. As a member of The Claremont Colleges, CMC’s dynamic programs and eminent teacher-scholars develop students into leaders in the private, public, and social sectors. Located on a beautiful residential campus east of Los Angeles, the College offers generous scholarship and financial aid, and rigorous, broad academic training in the social sciences, sciences, and the humanities, with a widely recognized expertise in economics and government. The college achieves its distinctive mission of producing responsible leaders by providing a community ethos that is committed to collaboration and the free exchange of ideas, nationally recognized athletic programs, and rich opportunities for advanced research, real world experience, and internships through student-led enterprises and 11 research institutes. About UCLA Anderson Forecast UCLA Anderson Forecast is one of the most widely watched and often-cited economic outlooks for California and the nation and was unique in predicting both the seriousness of the early-1990s downturn in California and the strength of the state's rebound since 1993. More recently, the Forecast was credited as the first major U.S. economic forecasting group to declare the recession of 2001. www.uclaforecast.com. # # #


CMC hosts Special Olympics athletes and coaches
Community Outreach
Before the Special Olympics World Games begin on July 25, more than 7,000 athletes and 3,000 coaches representing 177 countries were welcomed to communities throughout Southern California. In collaboration between Claremont McKenna College, Pomona College and the city of Claremont, Special Olympics Delegations from Bolivia, Latvia, Republic of Georgia, and Curacao were welcomed to the Claremont community. The Special Olympics Delegations stay in Claremont will help athletes become acclimated to Southern California, as well as offering a place to prepare and rest before the Special Olympics begin. Activities have been planned for athletes, coaches and the Claremont community, including: Special Olympics Community Concert Thursday, July 23 6:00 - 8:30 p.m. Memorial Park in the city of Claremont Pep Rally Friday, July 24 9:00 -10 a.m. Bixby Plaza at Pomona College The 2015 Special Olympics World Games is the largest sports and humanitarian event anywhere in the world in 2015, and the single biggest event in Los Angeles since the 1984 Olympic Games. In addition to the thousands of athletes and coaches participating in the Special Olympics, the event is expected to draw 30,000 volunteers and an anticipated 500,000 spectators. Millions of fans around the world will also be able to watch coverage of the Special Olympics on ESPN and ABC. For more information on the Special Olympics World Games Los Angeles 2015, please visit http://www.la2015.org/.


Professor Gastón Espinosa Co-Organizes Religion and Film Conference at the Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg in Germany
Faculty, Religion
Religion and Film scholars from Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States, including Claremont McKenna College Professor Gastón Espinosa, attended the international conference on Protestant Reformation on Screen: Religion, Politics, and Aesthetics in European and American Movies, June 24-27 at Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg in Germany. Espinosa first proposed the idea of the conference to his two co-directors – Erik Redling of the University of Halle and Jason Stevens of the University of Maryland – during their sabbaticals at the National Humanities Center in North Carolina. Hosted by the Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg and the Muhlenberg Center for American Studies at Muhlenberg College (Germany), conference organizers wanted to fill a major gap in the fields of Religion and Film and Religion and Popular Culture Studies by examining how cinema has portrayed the Protestant Reformation and the rise and spread of Protestantism throughout Europe and the New World in American and European film. The international nature of the conference compared representations, aesthetics, values, gender, sexuality, and religious traditions, symbols, and leaders, as well as political ideologies across decades and national film industries. While Hollywood has produced many of the “Bible and Sandals” films (positive portrayals about Jesus and other religious leaders in the Bible), post-1970 films have been more subversive and pushed the boundaries of Protestant and Christian notions of identity. Given the size of the global Protestant movement around the world (800 million) and in the United States (about half of the U.S. population), the conference focused on how the Protestant movement has been portrayed in international cinema, and continues to be felt in contemporary movies (as evidenced in the recent releases of Noah, Exodus: God and Kings, Fury and the remake of Left Behind), adding a crucial perspective to religious studies, cultural history, and the story of film. Espinosa will serve as the lead editor for a book titled Protestantism on Screen: Religion, Politics, and Aesthetics in American and European Movies. One of his ultimate aims is to generate a book that scholars can use in religious and media studies and that students can use in his RLST 171 – Religion and Film classes, which he teaches every spring at Claremont McKenna College. Specializing in American Religious History, U.S. Latino Religions, Pentecostal/Charismatic Movements, American Religion and Politics, Religion and Film, Dr. Espinosa spent one year in post-doctoral studies at the UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television and worked with Hollywood producer Lawrence Bender on showcasing Innocent Voices about child solders in El Salvador and marketing An Inconvenient Truth about the environment and climate change. Dr. Espinosa is the author of Latino Pentecostals in America: Faith and Politics in Action (Harvard University Press, June 2014), William J. Seymour and the Origins of Global Pentecostalism: A Biography and Documentary History (Duke University Press, 2014), and is the recipient of the National Humanities Fellowship, the Northwestern University Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship, and the Dartmouth College César Chávez Fellowship. He is also the Arthur V. Stoughton Associate Professor of religious studies at Claremont McKenna College.


Roberts Pavilion construction update, July 2015
Architecture, Campus Life, Even though students are off on summer break for several more weeks, campus is still a frenzy of activity with the continued construction of Roberts Pavilion. Currently, workers are in the process of erecting the curtain wall of the 130,000-plus square-foot Roberts Pavilion. The curtain wall is the exterior framing of the building. There are several phases involved in erecting the curtain wall, including medal stud framing, insulation, water proofing and terra-cotta paneling. Above: Terra-cotta paneling on the northeast exterior of Roberts Pavilion The current stage is expected to be a 3-4 month process to move all the way around the exterior of the building. This 3-4 month stretch also includes roofing, installation of skylights and testing of the exterior to ensure that it is “weather tight” and much more. Once the exterior is complete, the construction crew will turn their focus to interior finishes of the building. Frank Perri, CMC's Director of Construction, gives a more in-depth construction update in this recent video interview. If you haven’t seen Roberts Pavilion lately, take a look at the live construction camera online and visit the Roberts Pavilion website for updates, videos and to view the latest photo album. Timeline of Events Feb. 11, 2014 – Roberts Pavilion Groundbreaking Ceremony April, 2014 – Ducey Gym Demolition complete May, 2014 – Earthwork Stage begins August, 2014 – Roberts Pavilion foundation completed September, 2014 – Structural Steel Stage began January, 2015 – Topping Out Ceremony Currently – Construction of superstructure and exterior curtain wall along with roofing and waterproofing, electrical piping and pool renovation.  


Angel Summit brings CMC entrepreneurs together
Alumni, Business, John Faranda ’79 named Ambassador-at-Large
Alumni
The following is an announcement from President Hiram Chodosh: I would like to update you on two related, exciting changes regarding the Office of Alumni and Parent Relations. First, I am pleased to announce that John Faranda ’79, who has served as Vice President for Alumni and Parent Relations since 2005, will be assuming a key position as Vice President and Ambassador-at-Large for the College. Over a period of a remarkable 30 years, John has served in many significant roles for CMC, including as an associate vice president, general secretary, and director of development. He has worked with hundreds of dedicated alumni and parent volunteer leaders on many of our most successful outreach and engagement programs. In 2010, the CMC Alumni Association established the John P. Faranda ’79 Student Service Award to recognize John’s exemplary contributions to the College. This is the next exciting chapter in John’s career at CMC. In this role, John will work with me to focus his full attention on strengthening and sustaining our personal and community relationships with our special alumni and friends, both domestically and internationally. Second, Evan Rutter ’06 will assume overall responsibility for the leadership of the Office of Alumni and Parent Relations. Evan has done an outstanding job during the past two years as director of the office, through the creation of ImpactCMC, expanded programming for reunion weekend, strong support for the parent board, and many other important initiatives. Evan will continue to work closely with me to support the Alumni Association and Parent Network and will report to Ernie Iseminger, the Vice President of Advancement. This reporting change will bring together the main aspects of our external work and help create an even closer ongoing connection with alumni and parent relations, public affairs, and development. These changes take effect on July 1. Please join me in congratulating both John and Evan in their newly expanded roles for the College. Very best, Hiram


Roth goes 'behind the key'
Faculty
"Behind the Key" is a special feature designed by the Phi Beta Kappa Society to highlight distinguished members of the society working in various fields and professions. The subject of the Society's "Behind the Key" spotlight earlier this summer was CMC's own John Roth, Edward J. Sexton Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, preeminent scholar of the Holocaust, and inspiration to generations of undergraduates in the fields of Holocaust studies and human rights. "My passion is to do what I can," he tells his Phi Beta Kappa interviewer, "as a liberal arts teacher-scholar, to resist mass atrocity crimes and other abuses of human rights." Roth's humble "do what I can" has translated, during a career of some 40 years, into countless books, essays, and articles that he has published or edited, his service to organizations devoted to human rights and the humanities (for example, the Federation of State Humanities Councils), his founding of a center devoted to Holocaust study at CMC, and his central role in the College's PPE program. On the CMC campus, his passion and zeal for human rights also has culminated in the recent establishment of the John K. Roth Professorship by his many former students who wanted to create a permanent named professorship in his honor at the College.  Today that professorship is held by Wendy Lower, director of the Mgrublian Center for Human Rights. Roth's interview with "Behind the Key" includes his reflections on liberal arts education, mass atrocity crimes, and the special lessons he's learned as an integral part of the Claremont Colleges community. Read this feature in PDF format


CMC puts best foot forward in Freedom 5000 race
Community Outreach, Sports
The CMC family was out in force on the morning of July 4 to run the Freedom 5000 1K/5K, an annual community celebration taking place on the tree-lined streets of Claremont. CMC's group of runners -- comprised of staff, faculty, alumni, family members -- formed one of the largest groups in this annual event kicking off the city's celebration of the Fourth of July.   Organized by Development's Josh Walter '01, the CMC group wore burgundy-colored headbands stamped with "CMC 26.2" similar to the ones worn by CMCers running in this year's L.A. Marathon earlier this spring. For the 5K event, the starter's gun went off promptly at 8 a.m., sending hundreds of runners of all ages on a course through the northeast section of The Claremont Colleges (past HMC, Scripps, Pitzer, and CMC), down Claremont Boulevard to Sixth Street, down Mills Avenue to First Street and over to College Avenue. The stretch of College Avenue formed the race's final mile, testing many runners' endurance with a climb through Pomona College as they headed for the finish line on Yale Avenue. The Freedom 5000 also included a 1K Kids Run as well as a 5K Competitive Race Walk. Participation fees are used to support Claremont High School's Cross Country team.


Eyes on India
Asia, Faculty,

CMC mourns loss of former Trustee Larry Hammett '57
Alumni, Trustees
The CMC family is mourning the loss of Larry Hammett, a member of the Class of 1957 and former Trustee who passed away last Friday in Santa Barbara. He was 81. Like Pete Welsh '50 who passed away earlier this year, Hammett was another prominent, active member from the College's early classes who gave multi-faceted leadership and support to the College during a crucial period of growth and change. Hammett was born in Santa Barbara on June 17, 1934, to a family with deep connections to the Santa Barbara area. The Hammett family helped found several of the city's most important cultural organizations, including the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. After studying business administration at Claremont Men's College in the mid-1950s, Hammett established a trust career with County National Bank in Santa Barbara, followed by careers with the trust division of Wells Fargo Bank, and Title Insurance and Trust Company. He went on to start his own real estate consulting firm, Hammett and Associates. The Hammett family not only has roots in Santa Barbara (and also in Spokane, Washington) but in Claremont as well. They are one of the Claremont Colleges' legacy families, which includes son Bob (a member of CMC Class of 1984), his niece's son Augie (a member of CMC Class of 2016), and daughter Denise (a member of Scripps Class of 1983). Along with his service on the College's Board of Trustees from 1996 to 2009 (which included sitting on the Board's Academic Affairs and Buildings and Grounds committees), Hammett served on the board of the Family of Benjamin Z. Gould Center for Humanistic Studies until 2004. He was also actively engaged with CMC's Alumni Association in the Santa Barbara/Ventura area. With his wife, Astrid, he provided support to many CMC students through the Hammett/Graham Scholarship and the Lawrence T. Hammett '57 P'84 Alumni Scholarship as well as assisting the College's professors in their scholarship work through the Hammett Fund for Faculty Research. Hammett's philanthropy hasn't been limited to CMC: He and his wife have supported many worthy causes beyond the College's campus. These include the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, the Santa Barbara Historical Museum, and the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. In fact, Larry Hammett also served as trustee on Laguna Blanca's board, and on the Boards of the Alhambra and Montecito Rotary Clubs, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara Historical Museum, Friendship Manor, and Trinity Lutheran Church. Hammett is survived by wife Astrid, daughters Denise and Lisa, and sons Doug and Bob.


Services held tomorrow for Former Trustee Larry Hammett (1934-2015)
Alumni, Trustees
The CMC family is mourning the loss of Larry Hammett, a member of the Class of 1957 and former Trustee who passed away last Friday in Santa Barbara. He was 81. Like Pete Welsh '50 who passed away earlier this year, Hammett was another prominent, active member from the College's early classes who gave multi-faceted leadership and support to the College during a crucial period of growth and change. Hammett was born in Santa Barbara on June 17, 1934, to a family with deep connections to the Santa Barbara area. The Hammett family helped found several of the city's most important cultural organizations, including the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. After studying business administration at Claremont Men's College in the mid-1950s, Hammett established a trust career with County National Bank in Santa Barbara, followed by careers with the trust division of Wells Fargo Bank, and Title Insurance and Trust Company. He went on to start his own real estate consulting firm, Hammett and Associates. The Hammett family not only has roots in Santa Barbara (and also in Spokane, Washington) but in Claremont as well. They are one of the Claremont Colleges' legacy families, which includes son Bob (a member of CMC Class of 1984), his niece's son Augie (a member of CMC Class of 2016), and daughter Denise (a member of Scripps Class of 1983). Along with his service on the College's Board of Trustees from 1996 to 2009 (which included sitting on the Board's Academic Affairs and Buildings and Grounds committees), Hammett served on the board of the Family of Benjamin Z. Gould Center for Humanistic Studies until 2004. He was also actively engaged with CMC's Alumni Association in the Santa Barbara/Ventura area. With his wife, Astrid, he provided support to many CMC students through the Hammett/Graham Scholarship and the Lawrence T. Hammett '57 P'84 Alumni Scholarship as well as assisting the College's professors in their scholarship work through the Hammett Fund for Faculty Research. Hammett's philanthropy hasn't been limited to CMC: He and his wife have supported many worthy causes beyond the College's campus. These include the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, the Santa Barbara Historical Museum, and the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. In fact, Larry Hammett also served as trustee on Laguna Blanca's board, and on the Boards of the Alhambra and Montecito Rotary Clubs, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara Historical Museum, Friendship Manor, and Trinity Lutheran Church. Hammett is survived by wife Astrid, daughters Denise and Lisa, and sons Doug and Bob. A memorial service will be held this Saturday, June 27, at 10 a.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 909 North La Cumbre Road, in Santa Barbara.


Sara Birkenthal ’13 co-authors Wall Street Journal op-ed
Alumni, Global Understanding, <
CMC alumna Sara Birkenthal ’13 and Jared Genser, an associate of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University, co-authored the op-ed “At Home With Our Iranian Nuclear Partners” in the June 23, 2015, issue of the Wall Street Journal.   Birkenthal and Genser caution the downplaying of criticism of Iran on human rights in hopes of securing a nuclear deal.    “Regardless of the outcome of the nuclear negotiations, the U.S. should reaffirm its commitment to advancing human rights in Iran. That means making the removal of sanctions contingent on tangible improvements in Iran’s human-rights situation. This would include releasing political prisoners and halting executions for political crimes or for which there was no due process of law.”   Since graduating from CMC, Birkenthal has been working at Perseus Strategies, an international law and consulting firm that focuses on human rights, humanitarian, and corporate social responsibility projects.    She is also a fellow of the National Endowment for Democracy’s Penn Kemble Youth Forum on Democracy and will be spending next year on a Fulbright Scholarship in Bahrain studying Arabic and doing research on women's participation in the economy.    Read the Wall Street Journal article (PDF format)  


Prof. Wendy Lower discusses Ukraine situation during Kiev visit
Faculty, International,

A night of drama and whimsy with poet and CMC Professor Emeritus Ricardo Quinones
Arts & Culture, Poetry
The month of June opened with a special offering of poetry with a twist, when selected narrative and lyrical poems by CMC Professor Emeritus Ricardo Quinones were “redacted” by two actors on the stage of the Beyond Baroque Literary/Arts Center in Venice Beach.   We say with a “twist” because often poets read their own work to mixed results depending on any number of mitigating factors including the timbre of their voices.   But with professional actress Lisa Robins and CMC’s own Associate Director of Leadership Giving Todd Mandel enthusiastically holding forth and in fine voice, Quinones’ poesy (from his collections A Sorting of the Ways and Finishing Touches) lived up to the night’s advertisement as “Poetic Drama” with a bit of whimsy (“To Pick a Penny”) added for good measure.   And, as an additional inspired touch, Joshua Rosett, who is Curb Family Associate Professor of Business and Law and Roberts Fellow (and Financial Economics Institute director), performed yeoman’s service with a mood-setting cello accompaniment (“Appalachian Spring,” “Oh Shenandoah,” “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” and “Amazing Grace”) that effectively underscored the verse being recited.   “As a poet, Ricardo’s keeping alive the modernist flame that was established by William Carlos Williams and Ezra Pound; a rich vein of American poetry,” said Richard Modiano, Beyond Baroque’s director.   Modiano praised Quinones’ poetry for its vivid energy.   “Ricardo’s poetry deals with personal epiphanies and travails, the impact of public events on the consciousness of the poet,” Modiano said. “It’s the language of ordinary life, demotic speech. But when a poet like Ricardo tackles that demotic speech, he finds out what is alive about it and cuts away the clichés and brings it to vivid life.”   Quinones himself described the reading as experience by way of experimentation.   “We experiment today with the notion that there is no longer the possibility of poetic drama; but we can find the drama in poetry and in verse and that’s what we’re doing today,” he said. “Lisa and Todd will read the poems and we’ll get out of it the experience of dramatic voices and the whole emotional dramatic experience. It improves the comprehensibility.”   According to Quinones, who taught at CMC for 39 years and has been writing poems for the last 17, the ability to feature actors redacting his work is a real boon. “Many poets, no matter how good they are, are dull as hell when reading their own work,” he said.   The reading included such poems as: “SoCal: A Sorting of the Ways,” “The Crow,” “The Power of Blackness,” “Wintertime Sun,” “The American Writer,” “Trackings of the Mind,” “A Glass of Red Wine,” “She Trod with Silver Slippers” and “Broken Lilacs.”   It finished with one of Quinones’ most evocative poems –“Shanksville” – which entwines the events of 9/11 with such seemingly improbable placeholders as the poet Robert Frost and the Wright Brothers. (Frost wrote a poem called “Kitty Hawk.”)   “I consider Robert Frost to be the poetic father of us all,” Quinones said.   “People say why do poets publish books of 90 pages when novels are 200 pages?” said Modiano. “The reason for that – and it couldn’t be embodied better than in Ricardo’s work – is because each poem is as dense as a chapter of a novel. A poet is forced to pack as much meaning as he can in a limited number of words. Reading poetry is like reading supercharged text.”   In addition to the two poetry collections used in the readings, Quinones is the author of such prize-winning volumes as The Changes of Cain: Violence and the Lost Brother in Cain-Abel Literature (1991), Dualisms: The Agons of the Modern World (2007), and Erasmus and Voltaire: Why They Still Matter (2010).   As far as the state of modern poetry goes, Quinones had an economical answer: “It’s plentiful.” He admitted that his answer was a bit politic, but that it represents what he thinks of the whole gamut of contemporary poetry.   “As usual, there are cliques and cabals and areas of association that foster their own,” he said, “but then we have a writer like Billy Collins, a marvelous poet – pure wit. And that, to me, is what seems to be absent in much of modern poetry – wit.”   Founded in 1968, Beyond Baroque is a public space dedicated to expanding the public’s knowledge of poetry, literature and art through cultural events and community interaction.   Through the years, the Center has played muse to the Venice Beats, the burgeoning Punk movement and visiting scholars. Many of the city’s leading literary talents, including Dennis Cooper, Wanda Coleman, Tom Waits, Exene Cervenkova, and Amy Gerstler, are alumni of the Center’s Wednesday night poetry workshop.


Alicia Frausto ’17 receives prestigious Gilman Scholarship
Global Understanding
Alicia Frausto ’17 has been selected to receive the  prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman Scholarship for her upcoming semester in Strasbourg, France. According to Mary Beth Haselfeld, Assistant Director for Off-Campus Study in the Center for Gobal Education:  “The Gilman program seeks to assist students facing financial obstacles  in achieving their goals to go abroad. Alicia Continue Reading


Men’s and women’s tennis add to trophy case at NCAAs
Campus Life
At the NCAA Division III Singles and Doubles Tennis Championships which ran from May 21-23 in Mason, Ohio, members of the CMS Stags won both the singles and doubles titles while the Athenas’ top doubles team finished as the Division III runner-up. Read complete recaps of the final day of the singles and doubles championships Continue Reading


Tennis: Stags to play for national title; Athenas in third place match
Campus Life
Mason, Ohio – With two days in the books at the NCAA Division III Tennis Championships final rounds, the Claremont-Mudd-Scripps men’s tennis team’s national title hopes are still alive after a win over Washington University St. Louis in the semifinals, while the CMS women’s tennis team lost its semifinal match and will play for third Continue Reading


Stags Tennis wins D-III title, Athenas finish in fourth
Slideshow
MASON, Ohio – Both the CMS men’s and women’s tennis teams just completed record breaking seasons. The Stags won the NCAA Division III national title for the first time since 1981, while the Athenas finished in fourth place which tied for the team’s best finish in program history. Read recaps below of the men’s title Continue Reading


Commencement 2015
Commencement
Critically acclaimed author Azar Nafisi was the featured speaker at Claremont McKenna’s 68th Annual Commencement Ceremony, held May 16 on Pritzlaff Field. Nafisi, who also received an honorary degree from CMC, urged graduates to use their liberal arts education to disrupt or “disturb the peace” and avoid complacency. “This is the main function of knowledge,” Continue Reading


CMS Wall of Famer Shelly Sheinbein ’10 talks sports psychology
Psychology
The CMC Psychology Club recently brought Shelly Sheinbein ’10 to the College to talk about her work with Division I athletes and the general steps to becoming a sports psychologist or sports consultant. In the April 10 talk, she provided a general introduction to sports psychology, her experiences in the lab, on the track/ tennis Continue Reading


Jose A. Campos ’91 leads one of U.S.’s most important accounting bodies
Business
Jose A. Campos ’91 was recently appointed by CA Gov. Edmund G. Brown, Jr. to serve as President of the California Board of Accountancy (CBA), a body regulating over 97,000 Certified Public Accountants and Public Accountants which, the largest group of licensed accounting professionals in the nation. Campos, who is currently a partner at Deloitte Continue Reading


Postseason is here for several spring sports
Campus Life
With the academic year winding down, so have the seasons for several sports teams with CMS Athletics and Claremont McKenna College. However, five CMS varsity sports (women’s tennis, men’s tennis, men’s track & field, women’s track & field and men’s golf), along with The Claremont Colleges men’s rugby team are still in action with postseason Continue Reading


Lindsay Claiborn ’05 launches new podcast on women in science
Science
Lindsay Claiborn ’05 has launched a new science-focused podcast called Beyond the (Micro)scope at scopepodcast.com, @scopepodcast and facebook.com/scopepodcast. The podcast discusses science, technology, innovation, current events, business topics and STEM careers through the lens of women involved in the fields. The next episode airing May 19 features an interview with fellow alum Dana Weiser ’05.


Dual Kravis Anniversaries Celebrated at CMC
Alumni
On April 23, the Kravis Leadership Institute (KLI) and the Kravis Prize celebrated their 20th and 10th Anniversaries, respectively, with a jam-packed schedule of multiple events that took place over the morning, afternoon and evening. The festivities culminated with the 2015 Henry R. Kravis Prize for Nonprofit Leadership being awarded to Endeavor, an organization that Continue Reading


Message from President Hiram E. Chodosh regarding CMC’s new VP Academic Affairs/Dean of the Faculty
Faculty
Dear Members of the CMC Community: I am pleased to announce that Peter Uvin, who currently serves as Provost and Professor of Political Science at Amherst College, has been selected as our new Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty. Peter will succeed Nick Warner, to whom we are all deeply grateful Continue Reading


New Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty named at Claremont McKenna College
Faculty
Today Claremont McKenna College President Hiram Chodosh announced that he has named Peter Uvin, currently the Provost and Professor of Political Science at Amherst College, as CMC’s new Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty. “Peter’s extraordinary achievements, from award-winning scholarship and institutional development field work in Africa to his successful academic Continue Reading


New faculty books: Chasing a tempest of an idea
Arts & Culture
Look up the word “sympathy” in the dictionary and what do you find? Not a single definition, but a number of them, all pointing to the same general meaning: the feeling of compassion toward another being. In his new book, The Virtue of Sympathy: Magic, Philosophy, and Literature in Seventeenth-Century England (Yale University Press), Associate Continue Reading


A time for candid conversations, assessments, solutions
Leadership
When the Board of Trustees voted 40 years ago, on April 24, 1975, to turn CMC into a coeducational institution, historian Kevin Starr writes in his history of the college that the vote marked a major milestone in CMC’s first 50 years. Today, the opportunities for growth and enrichment for female students at CMC — and The Claremont Colleges, in Continue Reading


Rose Institute’s Wesley Edwards ’18 on the use of police body cameras
Politics
Ferguson, Missouri, a once obscure suburb of St. Louis, found itself on the national stage for an issue that dominated headlines and public debate for much of the last six months. The death of Michael Brown in an encounter with a police officer focused attention on the issue of fatal use of force by police. Continue Reading


New fellows bring international flavor to Athenaeum
Athenaeum
CMC has a rich tradition of attracting students from all over the world and that international composite is now represented by its Athenaeum Woolley Fellows for 2015-16 – Henrietta Toivanen ’17 and Shang Xuan Yeo ’16. Henrietta, an international relations and biophysics major, hails from Finland, while Xuan, an international relations and economics major, comes Continue Reading


Professor Gastón Espinosa looks at “Latinos, Religion, and Secularization”
Faculty
Claremont McKenna College is pleased to announce the publication of a new book by one of the world’s foremost scholars on global Pentecostalism and current professor of religious studies, Gastón Espinosa. Latino Pentecostals in America: Faith and Politics in Action published by Harvard University Press provides a social and cultural history of the widespread conversion of Continue Reading


Rose Institute Research Assistant Wesley Edwards ’18 on the use of police body cameras
Politics
Ferguson, Missouri, a once obscure suburb of St. Louis, found itself on the national stage for an issue that dominated headlines and public debate for much of the last six months. The death of Michael Brown in an encounter with a police officer focused attention on the issue of fatal use of force by police. Continue Reading


CMC’s Got Talent
Arts & Culture
On April 16, ASCMC and CPB teamed up to produce the first-ever “CMC’s Got Talent.” The show, about two hours in length, provided a night of music, dance, and comedy. Mirroring NBC’s television show “America’s Got Talent,” CMC’s version had a panel of student judges, comedic hosts, and lots of talent. Student judges based the Continue Reading


CMC students fill ranks of prestigious scholarships
Alumni
Among the many traditions at CMC is its enviable track record in the number of students who win scholarships and fellowships among a nationwide (sometimes worldwide) field of highly competitive applicants. And this year is no different with CMCers finishing in the top rank of some of the most prestigious academic awards programs in the Continue Reading


Robert Day Scholars take bow at annual Recognition Dinner in L.A.
Alumni
Diligence and hard work don’t go unnoticed at CMC. At the Robert Day School of Economics and Finance, the School recognizes students selected into the Robert Day Scholars Program by hosting an annual dinner to celebrate their accomplishments – the latest held at the California Club in Los Angeles on April 16. During the Scholars Continue Reading


CMC Awarded Grant from Luce Foundation for 5C EnviroLab Asia Project
Asia
CMC has been awarded a $100,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation on behalf of the five colleges to support a new project called EnviroLab Asia. This exploration grant, made possible through the Luce Initiative on Asia Studies and the Environment (LIASE), will create an “innovative architecture” at the colleges for studying intersections between Asian Continue Reading


David Mgrublian ’82 P’11 on the Center for Human Rights
Global Understanding
Remarks made by CMC Board of Trustees Chairman David Mgrublian ’82 P’11 on April 10, 2015 “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” As many of you know, April 24th is a day of special significance in the Armenian community – it is the day we remember the Armenian Genocide. What you Continue Reading


CMC Students Power through to 1st Place in 5C Power Down
Student
CMC’s environmental club, SSPEAR (Sustainable Students Promoting Environmental Action & Responsibility), recently won the 4th annual “5C Power Down Challenge” against teams from the other Claremont Colleges. According to Aileen Dinh, Webmaster and Publicity coordinator for SSPEAR, it’s a vast improvement from the club’s last-place finish last year when the club’s overall energy usage actually Continue Reading


See winning student photos from study abroad
Off-Campus Study
It is the distinct pleasure of the Off-Campus Study Office to announce the study abroad photo contest winners for this semester. The winners are: Grand Prize: Karissa Munoz IES Salamanca, Spain “My first Halloween outside of the US was definitely a treat! My favorite part was when my roommate Robyn Meister CMC ’16 and I Continue Reading


CMC’s Center for Human Rights is Renamed to Honor Mgrublian Family Gift
Alumni
In a celebration April 10th at the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum, CMC’s Center for Human Rights was renamed the Mgrublian Center for Human Rights in honor of Margaret Mgrublian P’11 and David Mgrublian ’82, P’11, in recognition of their generous donation to the Center. The program included remarks by CMC President Hiram Chodosh and Wendy Continue Reading


Zachariah Oquenda ‘16 named 2015 Truman Scholar
Awards
Former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright, President of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation, announced today that Claremont McKenna College (CMC) student Zachariah Oquenda ‘16 has been selected as a 2015 Truman Scholar. Oquenda, an Edward J. Sexton Philosophy, Political Science, and Economics Fellow at Claremont McKenna College, is the 18th Truman Scholar from Continue Reading


Rose Institute Research Assistants take Top Two Honors at California Crime Conference
Awards
Rose Institute of State and Local Government research assistants Francesca Hidalgo-Wohlleben ’17 and Jessica Jin ’16 took 1st and 2nd place, respectively, for presentations related to second- and third-striker prison population data at the Association for Criminal Justice Research (ACJR)  (California) conference on “Criminal Justice in a Community Perspective” March 26-27 in Sacramento. Hidalgo-Wohlleben (a Continue Reading


Prof. Lily Geismer wins prestigious history fellowship
History
Lily Geismer, assistant professor of history, has won a fellowship for next year at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University. The award is one of the most competitive and prestigious fellowships in the field of American history. Geismer, who recently published Don’t Blame Us: Suburban Liberalism and the Transformation of Continue Reading


Lucas Agnew ’15 starts super-PAC, gets media attention
Politics
Lucas Agnew ’15 started the Millennials for Jeb super PAC (Political Action Committee) in January after being inspired by the Ready for Hilary bus that visited CMC last year. The super PAC, founded to support the Presidential candidacy of former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, will fundraise, register voters and use social media and other means to Continue Reading


Bringing conferences to students
Leadership
One of the ways in which the Kravis Leadership Institute (KLI) contributes to the life of Claremont McKenna College students is by introducing them to academic conferences, whether it is by bringing conferences to campus, or by taking students away to them. Over the past semester, the KLI hosted the 23rd Kravis-de Roulet Leadership Conference; Continue Reading


Dreier Roundtable attempts to “Bridge The Immigration Divide”
Alumni
A distinguished panel of experts met at the Brookings Institution March 26th in Washington D.C. as part of the Dreier Roundtable to discuss the topic of “Bridging the Immigration Divide: Forging a Bi-Partisan Policy on Visas for STEM Graduates.” The Roundtable, jointly sponsored by CMC and the Brookings Institution (a leading American think tank), is Continue Reading


Rise nationally continues for CMS in latest D-III Directors’ Cup standings
Campus Life
CLEVELAND, Ohio – The rise of Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Athletics on the national stage continued this winter, as CMS moved up from 19th after the fall, to 14th in the final winter Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup Division III standings for 2014-15. The latest rankings were announced on April 2 by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Continue Reading


Endeavor to be awarded the 2015 Henry R. Kravis Prize in Nonprofit Leadership
Awards
When Javier Okhuysen and Carlos Orellana wanted to help prevent avoidable blindness in Mexico through state-of-the art, low-cost cataract surgery and eye care, they turned to Endeavor to help develop their business, salaUno. When Leila Velez sought help to grow her afro-Brazilian hair care business, Endeavor provided her with the necessary business tools and mentoring Continue Reading


CMC Alumni make The San Francisco Business Times 40 Under 40 list
Alumni
The San Francisco Business Times recently published their annual “40 Under 40 Class of 2015.” Choosing the 40 most influential talented young professionals who are driving the Bay Area economy proved to be challenging as hundreds of nominations were submitted for consideration and the competition was fierce.  However, two Claremont McKenna alumni Nate Gross, M.D. Continue Reading


Dreier Roundtable Hosted Conference on “Bridging the Immigration Divide: Forging a Bi-Partisan Policy on Visas for STEM Graduates”
Alumni
  UPDATE: Video of conference (3/26):   EARLIER STORY (3/23): The Dreier Roundtable (DRt) at Claremont McKenna College and the Brookings Institution will host DRt’s inaugural Washington, D.C. conference on immigration reform, “BRIDGING THE IMMIGRATION DIVIDE: Forging a Bi-Partisan Policy on Visas for STEM Graduates,” which will focus on how to retain foreign graduates of Continue Reading


CMS Swim & Dive with strong showings at Nationals
Campus Life
Women’s and men’s swimmers & divers from Claremont-Mudd-Scripps competed at the NCAA Division III Championships March 18-21 in Shenandoah, Texas. For the third-straight season, the CMS men’s swimming & diving team secured a top-10 finish at the NCAAs. This season, the Stags wrapped up the four-day NCAA Championships which ended on March 21, with a Continue Reading


Teaching a nation to understand itself
George Thomas
When critics complain, especially now that the 2016 presidential campaign is starting to take shape, that the federal government should stay out of public education, or that it has no business there, it would make sense for them to turn to George Thomas (pictured, left) for some helpful historical perspective. Why?  Because Thomas, a professor of government Continue Reading


Book edited by Prof. Rosenbaum documents Chinese University in era of upheaval
Books
A new book of essays (New Perspectives on Yenching University, 1916-1952: A Liberal Education for a New China) edited by Arthur Lewis Rosenbaum, associate professor of East Asian History at CMC, has just been published by Brill Academic Publishing. The book reevaluates and places into a larger context, in an era marked by war and Continue Reading


Ryan McMahon ’08 Writes A Hit Song  
Business
Songwriter Ryan McMahon ’08, who majored in economics and accounting at CMC, recently co-wrote a hit song with the band Walk The Moon. The song “Shut Up and Dance” just hit #10 on the all iTunes chart and is currently climbing Billboard’s Hot 100 chart. See the video for the song featuring a sampling of dance scenes Continue Reading


Students Learn the Art of Persuasion at 7th Annual Robert Day School Case Competition
Awards
A rewarding and for some, nerve-racking day of presentations and persuasion, marked the 7th Annual Robert Day School Case Competition held March 6th in the Bauer Center. The takeaway for the winning team was a $5,000 prize but everyone who competed was able to hone a vital skill set that could be crucial in the Continue Reading


For a Group of CMCers, Running the LA Marathon was Imperative
Alumni
There’s an old motivational saying that goes: It’s not where you start, it’s where you finish. When you run the LA Marathon in record heat, the question quickly becomes – if you finish. According to the Los Angeles Times, more than 22,000 people raced the 26.2 mile course from Dodger Stadium to Santa Monica last Continue Reading


Scholar’s work on plundered art makes news in Germany
Business
Germany’s biggest newspapers are following and reporting the recent work of Professor Jonathan Petropoulos, who has spent much of his academic career on the subject of  Nazi art looting. “We are still discovering new information concerning both Nazi art plundering and Allied restitution efforts,” said Petropoulos, who is John V. Croul Professor of European History. “My Continue Reading


Creating a heavenly kingdom on the Korean peninsula
Asia
In his new book Building a Heaven on Earth: Religion, Activism, and Protest in Japanese Occupied Korea (University of Hawaii Press), Albert L. Park, associate professor of history, addresses two primary questions: why and how Korean religious groups responded to growing rural poverty, social dislocation, and the corrosion of culture caused by forces of modernization under strict Continue Reading


Two alumni awarded prestigious Luce Scholarships
Asia
Two CMC alumni – Laura Shunk ’07 and Lanier Zimmer ’09 – have been named to the prestigious roles of Luce Scholars for 2015-16. In a highly competitive field, Shunk and Zimmer were among 18 candidates (from 16 institutions) selected from a pool of 156 nominees who won scholarship positions. Nationwide, up to 75 colleges and universities Continue Reading


Prof. Petropoulos’s work on Nazi art plunder makes news in Germany
Business
Some of Germany’s biggest newspapers are reporting on the recent work of Professor Jonathan Petropoulos on Nazi art looting. “We are still discovering new information concerning both Nazi art plundering and Allied restitution efforts,” says Petropoulos, who is the John V. Croul Professor of European History. “My lecture at a conference held at Columbia University Continue Reading


CMC History Professor Albert Park on Building a Heaven on Earth
Asia
In his new book Building a Heaven on Earth: Religion, Activism, and Protest in Japanese Occupied Korea (Univ. of Hawaii Press, 2015), Albert L. Park, associate professor of history, addresses two primary questions: why and how Korean religious groups responded to growing rural poverty, social dislocation, and the corrosion of culture caused by forces of modernization under Continue Reading


Two alumni receive prestigious Luce Scholarships to study in Asia
Asia
Two CMC alumni – Laura Shunk ‘07 and Lanier Zimmer ’09 – were named to the prestigious roles of Luce Scholars for 2015-16. In a highly competitive field, Shunk and Lanier were among 18 candidates (from 16 institutions) selected from a pool of 156 nominees who won scholarship positions. Nationwide, up to 75 colleges and Continue Reading


CMS winter sports heading to NCAAs
Campus Life
Each of the four winter sports teams for Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Athletics are participating in their respective NCAA Championships. Below is information on each of the teams including game and event times, information on where to watch and follow along and much more. Women’s Basketball CMS faces the University of Puget Sound in the first round of Continue Reading


RDS Scholars Help High Schoolers Become “Adults for a Day”
Business
The skies were overcast last Friday in Los Angeles but the financial concepts being taught by a group of Robert Day School (RDS) volunteers to kids from Banning High school were anything but cloudy. For the fourth straight year, 13 RDS Scholars, in partnership with Junior Achievement of Southern California (JASoCal), volunteered at JA Finance Continue Reading


For Becca Rosenthal ‘15, Empowerment Begins with a Dialogue
Global Understanding
By Tom Johnson For Becca Rosenthal ’15, resolving differences between Israelis and Palestinians, or anyone for that matter, begins with a single, concerted step — outreach. From reaching out, a dialogue can ensue and progress can be made. As Hillel Outreach Coordinator for the Open Hillel Campaign, Rosenthal put that idea – that Jewish Israeli’s Continue Reading


Robert Day School Scholars Practice the “Art of the Pitch”
Business
For a group of Scholars at the Robert Day School of Economics and Finance completing their MA’s this year, the 2nd Annual RDS Pitch Day held Feb. 13th was a resounding success. A morning session in which groups of students delivered 20-minute pitches on a variety of ideas to a seasoned panel of senior business Continue Reading


Winner Takes All: CMC is Victor in Harvard National Model United Nations Team Competition
Awards
For the first time ever, CMC’s Model United Nations (MUN) Team took home top honors during Harvard’s National Model United Nations conference held Feb. 12-15 in Boston. In aggregate competition, CMC competed against college and university student teams from more than 60 countries. In the annual competition, MUN teams send individual members to compete as part Continue Reading


A clean sweep of conference championships for CMS winter teams
Campus Life
For the second-straight year, all four winter sports teams for Claremont-Mudd-Scripps have each won their respective Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) championship, to earn a clean sweep in the winter sports at the conference level. The conference’s four winter sports offered which CMS competes in are women’s swimming & diving, men’s swimming & diving, Continue Reading


Prof. Gastón Espinosa publishes book on global Pentecostalism
Business
PROFESSOR GASTÓN ESPINOSA PUBLISHES WILLIAM J. SEYMOUR AND THE ORIGINS OF GLOBAL PENTECOSTALISM: A BIOGRAPHY AND DOCUMENTARY HISTORY Professor Gastón Espinosa, one of the world’s foremost scholars on global Pentecostalism, announced the publication of a new book on the subject, through a biography and documentary history of William J. Seymour (1870-1922), an African-American religious founder and leader Continue Reading


A Special Sneak Preview of The Hunting Ground
Community Outreach
From the Academy Award nominated filmmakers of The Invisible War, The Hunting Ground is a startling expose of sexual assault on US campuses, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on victims and their families. Weaving together verité footage and first-person testimonies, the film follows survivors as they pursue their education while fighting for justice Continue Reading


Register now for the SOURCE Nonprofit Summit
Community Outreach
  SOURCE Nonprofit Consulting, a student-run organization at Claremont McKenna College, is commemorating 10 years of community impact by hosting the SOURCE Nonprofit Summit: Celebrating Local Innovation & Collaboration on Friday, February 27, 2015, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. at Claremont McKenna College. The SOURCE Nonprofit Summit aims to celebrate and spark community collaboration, while Continue Reading


SOURCE Nonprofit Summit: Celebrating Local Innovation & Collaboration
Community Outreach
SOURCE Nonprofit Consulting, a student-run organization at Claremont McKenna College, is commemorating 10 years of community impact by hosting the SOURCE Nonprofit Summit: Celebrating Local Innovation & Collaboration on Friday, February 27, 2015, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. at Claremont McKenna College. The SOURCE Nonprofit Summit aims to celebrate and spark community collaboration, while highlighting Continue Reading


Prof. Daniel Krauss co-authors new book: The Psychology of the Law
Books
Claremont McKenna College is pleased to announce the publication of a new book by preeminent scholar and chair of the college’s Department of Psychology, Daniel Krauss. The Psychology of Law: Human Behavior, Legal Institutions, and Law argues that research in the field of law psychology has failed to address the real-world realities of the courtroom, Continue Reading


Highlights of the 2015 NYC and Pacific Northwest networking trips
Alumni
In January, the Financial Economics Institute and the Robert Day Scholars Program sponsored the 12th annual New York City Networking Trip (see students, pictured above). In the final week of winter break, nine juniors and five sophomores traveled to New York City to learn about the wide array of opportunities available in the financial services Continue Reading


2nd Annual RDS Pitch Day
Business
Robert Day School students completing their MA in Finance this year are taking part in the 2nd Annual RDS Pitch Day on Friday, February 13. RDS Pitch Day is designed to simulate the interaction between an early-career analyst (Robert Day Scholars) and a senior executive (a role played by an experienced CMC alumnus or parent). Continue Reading


Renowned Environmentalist David Orr to discuss “Hot Careers in a Warming World” at First Annual Green Careers Conference
Environment
The Roberts Environmental Center and Student impACT at Claremont McKenna College is hosting the First Annual Green Careers Conference on February 6, 2015, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. The conference will include a keynote presentation by renowned environmentalist David Orr, the Paul Sears Distinguished Professor of Environmental Studies and Politics and Senior Adviser to the Continue Reading


C-PaSS Panel Discussion: China’s Regional Role in Northeast Asia
Asia
The Claremont Chinese Political and Societal Studies Club (C-PaSS) is hosting a panel discussion on China’s Regional Role in Northeast Asia:  An Examination of China’s Relations with Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong on Monday, February 9. Join renowned scholars, Professors David Kang (USC), Dan Lynch (USC), and Minxin Pei (CMC), as they discuss China’s role Continue Reading


Experience CMC at Parents Weekend 2015
Business
Parents Weekend at Claremont McKenna College is this Saturday, February 14 – Monday, February 16.  Spend time with your student while participating in some exciting campus activities. Families will have the opportunity to interact with CMC faculty, administrators, students, and other parents. Experience the CMC community and spirit that your students enjoy each day as a CMCer. Events Continue Reading


Report from the 2015 NYC networking trip
Alumni
This January, the Financial Economics Institute and the Robert Day Scholars Program sponsored the 12th annual New York City Networking Trip. In the final week of winter break, nine juniors and five sophomores traveled to New York City to learn about the wide array of opportunities available in the financial services industry.  The trip offered Continue Reading


The Silent History
Arts & Culture
A recent article in The Los Angeles Times may have one of the better summaries of why a novel co-authored by Kevin Moffett remains rare and special more than two years since its publication: When The Silent History was first published in 2012, it thrillingly demonstrated how an e-book could be both a well-written novel Continue Reading


Helping Hank Williams and being a ‘Believer’
Arts & Culture
REGARDING HENRY: When she’s not applying her literary training to Jane Austen or to the pages of Ms. magazine or assisting students at the Center for Writing and Public Discourse, Center Director and Literature Professor Audrey Bilger devotes her energies to another important area of contemporary arts and culture:  restoration and preservation. The recent release and Grammy Continue Reading


New Book by Prof. Lily Geismer Traces the Reinvention of American Liberalism
Books
In her new book, Don’t Blame Us: Suburban Liberals and the Transformation of the Democratic Party, Lily Geismer, CMC assistant professor of history, challenges longstanding arguments that the rise of the right and the Reagan Revolution led to the decline of liberalism by looking at the liberal residents who lived and worked along the high-tech Continue Reading


Were they Reich propagandists or true artists?
Arts & Culture
“Is the notion of Nazi culture an oxymoron?” asks Jonathan Petropoulos in the preface of his new book, Artists Under Hitler: Collaboration and Survival in Nazi Germany (Yale University Press). “Was any ‘good’ culture produced during the Third Reich?” Many artists fled Germany in the years of Hitler’s rise to power, but what about those Continue Reading


Alumni men’s golfers keeping pro aspirations alive
Alumni
Former Claremont-Mudd-Scripps men’s golf All-Americans Tain Lee (CMC ’12) and Brad Shigezawa (CMC ’14) were NCAA Division III national champions during their time in Claremont. Their success as amateurs has carried over after college, as both golfers now are chasing down their dreams in the professional ranks. Over the last month, Shigezawa and Lee have Continue Reading


Keck Science Dean will depart at the end of 2014-2015 academic year
Keck Science
Dear Scripps, Claremont McKenna, and Pitzer Community Members, With sadness for our community but excitement for him, we announce David Hansen’s resignation as Weinberg Family Dean of the Keck Science Department effective June 30, 2015. He will be returning to his former position in the Chemistry Department at Amherst College. We are extremely grateful for Continue Reading


Frost book selected as a TLS ‘book of the year’
Arts & Culture
Here are a couple of important questions to consider at this time of year: What books should people read?  What books should they receive as gifts? As the holidays approach, a variety of media outlets are offering lists of their “recommended reads” and noteworthy titles.  One of the premier lists belongs to the Times Literary Supplement, which presented a Continue Reading


Students highlight impact and engagement through online journals
Business
CMC students like to make an impact and engage on issues that matter . See two student-edited journals that showcase international affairs along with technology and entrepreneurship. The Keck Journal of Foreign Affairs tackles issues such as the Syrian civil war, Turkey and ISIS, Ukrainian sovereignty, Mexican drug cartels and what trade with China means to Continue Reading


Running for college affordability
Campus Life
Want to do your part for college affordability? CMC students are organizing a team of students to run in the LA Marathon on March 15th to raise money for The Student Imperative, the College’s initiative to help ease financial hurdles to a CMC education. “We care deeply about lowering economic barriers and increasing socioeconomic diversity Continue Reading


Gavin Landgraf ’14 among only 12 in nation awarded Mitchell Scholarship
Alumni
Gavin Landgraf ’14 has been a awarded a highly-competitive George J. Mitchell Scholarship to study natural resource economics at National University of Ireland in Galway. According to the news release from US-Ireland Alliance which administers the award, the nationwide competition drew 270 applicants of which only 12 received scholarships. Ireland’s Ambassador to the US Anne Continue Reading


Prof. Pei: Hong Kong’s stand-off is heading for a showdown – and Xi’s future is at stake
Global Understanding
“Now that the protesters appear determined to test the limits of Beijing’s tolerance, the stakes are even higher. Facing increasingly radicalised demonstrators, Beijing’s strategy of “waiting out the protest” may no longer be tenable. It must either make concessions or take decisive action to end the protests,” says Minxin Pei in an Op-Ed for the Financial Times on Continue Reading


Student-led FUNDaFIELD asks for help for displaced Ugandan refugees
Entrepreneurship
The CMC-student led FUNDaFIELD team has recently launched an important new campaign and is calling all CMCers to join in their efforts to raise at least $28,000 dollars to relocate 31 Ugandan women and 198 Ugandan children from their temporary camp set to be demolished this month. FUNDaFIELD, founded and operated by Kyle Weiss ’15, Continue Reading


Celebrity chef Brigitte Nguyen ’03 shares holiday hosting tips and tricks
Alumni
Celebrity chef Brigitte Nguyen ’03 and host of the Cooking Channel’s roving reality series “From the Kitchens Of…” shares baking at the Athenaeum and holiday hosting tips and tricks. Read the article.


Professor Espinosa Surveys American Religious History in Summer Session


Claremont McKenna College Celebrates Success of George Roberts '66 P'93 Fundraising Challenge


Soft Skills Prove Harder than Expected


The Clean Plate Club


Stags Win SCIAC Tournament Title


CMC Lightens Up


Wisecracker: Yale Graduate Demetri Martin Leaves 'em Laughing at Bridges Auditorium


Connect with fellow Alumni on Facebook


Thinking Responsibly


Henry R. Kravis Prize in Leadership


Yes, it's Awesome. Kravis Center Wins Architectural Awards


Mexico, What Everyone Needs to Know


The Prop 8 Saga Continues


In Memoriam: Life Trustee Robert Silverstein


Soft Leader Skills is Leading Topic at Kravis-de Roulet Conference


Media Seeks CMC's Pei for Expertise in China Discussion


Knowledge Through Imagination


Smaller Classes and Hands-On Assistance Distinguish Summer Session at CMC


Student Athlete Michele Kee


CMC's Center for Civic Engagement builds community into CMC culture


FEI's Annual Network Trip to NYC 2012


CMC Alum to be Regular Trainer on New Food Network Show Fat Chef


Princeton Review ranks CMC Career Services Center in top 10


Kuwait Delegation Visits CMC


CMS Head Women's Basketball Coach Wins 500th Game


Three CMS Winter Sports Teams Rank High in National Polls


Kurt Vlasich Named Head Coach for CMS Volleyball


CMC Model UN Program Ranked Among Top 10 in North America


Sunil Rajaraman's '01 Scripted.com Raises $700k in Seed Financing


Does It Surprise You That S&P's New President Happens to be a Claremont McKenna Alumnus?


Does It Surprise You That S&amp;P's New President Happens to be a Claremont McKenna Alumnus?


Stuart Felkner '10 and Antoine Grant '07 Found Responsibly.com to Help Teachers Fund Educational Projects


CMC's New Silicon Valley Semester Program


CMC's New Silicon Valley Semester Internship Program


CMS Head Men's Tennis Coach Paul Settles Wins United States Tennis Association Campus and Community Outreach Award


CMC's Center for Writing and Public Discourse Receives Arthur Vining Davis Foundations Grant


Claremont College Students Gather with Keck Faculty to See Rare Astronomical Phenomenon


Get to Know CMC's New Massoud Chair of Accounting: Professor Ananda Ganguly


Two CMC Alumni Become Engaged on Campus


Professor Bassam Frangieh publishes new textbook, 'Arabic for Life'


College State Right Shadow