TEMPLE UNIVERSITY NEWS



University trustees explore future research partnerships at Temple Ambler
Campus News
Subtitle: Temple’s Board of Trustees made a trip to the university’s suburban Ambler Campus to explore its offerings and imagine potential research partnerships for its unique setting. May 23, 2018Temple University’s rising momentum extends well beyond its Main Campus and into Montgomery County—and at the end of the spring semester, the university’s Board of Trustees and President Richard M. Englert had a chance to explore the suburban Ambler Campus and see firsthand what it currently has to offer.  The trustees and Englert completed business of the day at Ambler, holding their final meeting of the school year, before the trustees explored a bit of the history, current projects, unique research, and diverse environments and gardens that comprise the campus. “One of the things that I love about Temple Ambler is how much the campus and the gardens influence, impact and inspire what is taking place within the classroom. In our classrooms and in our gardens today, students are learning by doing, designing and building landscape architecture projects, and learning plant science with the latest technology,” Provost JoAnne A. Epps said. “That technology and talent is leading the way toward a future where anyone can create sustainable food systems and researchers have a better understanding of how the natural and built environment can succeed and thrive.” Epps said the trustees have directed her to examine a variety of potential research partnerships and other types of coordinated efforts with departments within the university and outside organizations that would benefit students, faculty, alumni and the community as a whole. “At 187 acres of woodlands, meadows, formal gardens, streams and more, one of the greatest resources that Temple Ambler provides to the university is space and a rich tapestry of environments to conduct research in a broad range of disciplines,” Epps added. “There is great potential to conduct research at Temple Ambler that couldn’t take place anywhere else at the university. There is also great potential to partner with outside organizations to provide new and innovative educational and career opportunities to our students.” At Temple Ambler, civil engineering and earth and environmental science professors are researching seismic waves and earthquakes—an impossibility at Temple’s urban locations—while College of Science and Technology researchers study hydrology, weather and more. Criminal justice experts are training the next generation of police officers and park rangers on campus, while psychology students seek to understand the cognitive development of children in the Temple Infant and Child Lab. Students, faculty and staff also continue to expand a fully accredited aquaponics garden and research lab on the campus. During their time at Temple Ambler, the trustees observed firsthand examples of aquaponics techniques. In addition to touring the campus gardens, they learned about the nearly two dozen events, lectures, workshops and hands-on programs offered by the Ambler Arboretum and Temple Ambler EarthFest in the coming months that promote science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), environmental education and citizen science to students, researchers and community members. In the Ambler Campus Technology Center, trustees had a chance to test drive virtual reality and augmented reality hardware, which students on campus are already putting to use envisioning the future of the campus in extraordinarily rendered 3-D visualizations. The trustees also had a hands-on look at how 3-D printing is being used by several academic disciplines. The Ambler Campus Aquaponics Lab, for example, is working with the College of Engineering’s nationally recognized Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) program to teach high school students in Philadelphia to build aquaponics systems of their own, in part using 3-D printing—knowledge the students will in turn share with other schools while working to help eliminate urban food deserts. “As an institution of higher learning, we have the means, opportunity and obligation to teach the next generation of leaders, researchers, designers and teachers about protecting and preserving the planet that they will inherit,” said Vicki Lewis McGarvey, vice provost for University College. “We’re all very grateful that the trustees are open to and interested in seeing how the unique features and resources of Temple Ambler can be put to the best uses. We’re very excited to explore future partnerships that would mesh perfectly with the campus and work with us to support the mission of Temple Ambler and the University.”—James Duffy  The Board of Trustees visited the suburban Ambler Campus to explore its unique array of offerings.


New Temple Student Government leaders kick off community, campus efforts
Campus News
Subtitle: IgniteTU plans to focus on building community relationships, as well as improving safety and student services. May 22, 2018A new Temple Student Government administration was inducted April 30 to represent the student body for the 2018-19 academic year.  After its win, the IgniteTU team will begin its ambitious three-part governing platform to “enhance, amplify and empower” community relationships and student life on campus. Temple’s positive relationships with North Philadelphia neighbors are a top priority for the new administration. IgniteTU calls for more transparency between TSG and the local community. “Our administration plans to hold monthly community forums so that we are continuously listening to any and all of the concerns that the North Philadelphia community might have,” said TSG President Gadi Zimmerman.  The new administration also looks to further expand Temple’s reach to local youth by meeting with donors to establish more scholarship opportunities. IgniteTU also plans to reinstate monthly cleanups in the areas surrounding campus and install a compost facility that would be available to community members as well as students.  On campus, TSG plans to partner with Dining Services to improve dining halls to be more eco-friendly, pledging to be plastic-free by 2020, and to support the university’s efforts to be carbon neutral by 2050.  [node:sidebar_text] In addition, the team plans to enhance on-campus security, improving the efficiency of Flight—Temple’s on-demand evening shuttle service—and increasing lighting at Temple’s Regional Rail station. IgniteTU takes a strong stance when it comes to the quality of student life, promising to maintain a position of openness, awareness and communication through improvement of several services across campus.  The team wants to boost transfer student orientation and peer mentorship programs, advocate for more funding for Tuttleman Counseling Services, accelerate implementation of recovery housing and addiction recovery efforts, and fight campus hunger and homelessness. The team aims to accomplish the latter by building a stronger relationship with Aramark to offer more meal swipes for students in need. There will also be a push for additional support for various marginalized populations on campus, a Mental Wellness Week each semester and an effort to expand upon the annual Sexual Assault Prevention Week. “One of our main goals that we plan to work on throughout the year is making sure that Temple Student Government as a whole is more approachable,” Zimmerman said. “We want to make sure that all students on Temple’s campus are aware of TSG and all of the resources that we offer.”  —Nicole Quaste   The new Temple Student Government administration will focus on community relationships, campus security and student services.


Temple graduates largest class in history
Campus News
Subtitle: More than 10,000 students from as near as a block away in North Philadelphia and as far as Indonesia earned degrees in the Class of 2018, Temple’s largest class on record. May 10, 2018[node:video] As members of the 10,030-strong Class of 2018—the largest class in Temple University’s history—packed the Liacouras Center in their caps and gowns and prepared to embark on their post-college journeys, U.S. Sen. Cory Booker left them with words of advice. “Every moment, you have a chance to manifest your light, to show your power, to make a difference. I say to you, Class of 2018, you are powerful now, and my prayer for you is that every day of your life, you manifest that light, that brilliance, that hope and that promise,” said Booker, who delivered the Commencement address and received an honorary degree. “If you do that, I know that you will live a life so bright and so brilliant that generations yet unborn will bathe in your brilliance, your light and your hope.” Booker, the first black U.S. senator for New Jersey, regaled graduates with stories to illustrate hope and humility: of going with his mother to meet Congressman John Lewis on the day Booker was sworn in to the Senate; of his parents only being able to purchase their home in an all-white New Jersey suburb in the late 1960s with the help of attorneys; and of eventually tracing his roots to find some of those attorneys in recent years and thank them. U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, center, flanked by Trustee Drew Katz, left, and Board of Trustees Chair Patrick J. O’Connor, receives an honorary degree before addressing graduates at Temple’s 131st Commencement. (PHOTO: Ryan S. Brandenberg) Paige Hill, CLA ’18, the student Commencement speaker, also offered her classmates words of wisdom, reminding them that—in the words of the late U.S. Rep. Shirley Chisholm—if they aren’t offered a chair at the table, “bring your own chair.” “This tenacity, this drive to succeed no matter what you look like, where you come from, who refuses to support you is what makes us Temple Owls,” Hill said. Of 2017-2018 graduating students, 6,369 received their degrees in the spring semester, and hundreds participated in Temple’s 131st Commencement ceremony May 10. Still more will celebrate at individual school and college ceremonies to be held during the coming week. Graduates of the Class of 2018 hail from an impressive 96 countries, two U.S. territories (Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands), and 48 states, plus Washington, D.C. More than 180 are from the seven ZIP codes immediately surrounding Temple, and 18 percent—1,763 graduates—are from Philadelphia. The graduate who grew up closest to Main Campus comes from just a block away on North 13th Street, while the one who traveled furthest hails from Indonesia.  “You are the reason I have been at Temple more than 40 years, and I am immensely proud of you,” President Richard M. Englert said in his opening remarks. “You are forever Philly made and Temple made.” [node:pullquote] Englert reminded the graduates that they attended Temple at a pivotal time in the university’s history, as it gained national prestige. During the last four years, significant strides in HIV research have been made at Temple, and Temple marked the naming of its first Rhodes Scholar, Hazim Hardeman, among other notable accomplishments.  Women outnumbered men in this graduating class, with 5,315 women earning undergraduate or graduate degrees and 4,699 men earning degrees. The most common name among men graduating is Michael, while Emily is the most common name among women.  Four sets of twins graduated together, and 18 spring graduates also celebrated birthdays on May 10, Commencement day. The youngest person to earn a bachelor’s degree in this class is 20, the oldest 68.  Many members of this class are repeat Temple alumni: Two earned their fourth degrees from Temple, 18 earned their third and 334 earned their second.  In addition to Booker, Robert Bogle, chairman, president and CEO of the Philadelphia Tribune, and Meryl Levitz, the outgoing founding president and CEO of Visit Philadelphia, also received honorary degrees at this year’s Commencement. “Today, you graduate into your second family—your Temple family,” Provost JoAnne A. Epps told the graduates. “Thank you for sharing yourselves with us. Now go on to make us TU proud.”  <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oZqKhmTFo7c" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>This tenacity, this drive to succeed no matter what you look like, where you come from, who refuses to support you is what makes us Owls."Paige Hill, CLA '18More than 10,000 students hailing from as near as a block from Main Campus and as far as Indonesia earned degrees in the Class of 2018.


Temple serves as backdrop for politicians, national events
Campus News
Subtitle: Temple is often a sought-after location for political events and an important stop for incumbent lawmakers—and this semester was no exception. May 7, 2018As a vibrant university in the heart of Philadelphia, Temple is often looked to as a place for big political events—and this semester was no exception. Here’s a look back at some recent notable political figures who made stops on campus.  Pennsylvania Secretary of Education Pedro A. Rivera–March 13, 2018State Secretary of Education Pedro A. Rivera held a news conference on Main Campus to announce that Temple won its second “It’s On Us PA” grant for work combating sexual misconduct. The university is among 39 institutions of higher education across the state to be selected for a grant.  Gov. Tom Wolf–April 5, 2018Gov. Tom Wolf joined a group of state legislators in the Liacouras Center to announce a package of reform bills that would strengthen protections for victims of workplace sexual harassment and discrimination in Pennsylvania. The bills include banning mandatory non-disclosure agreements in cases of sexual assault and harassment; expanding protections for workers to include independent contractors, interns and full-time domestic workers; implementing required workplace trainings to prevent discrimination and harassment; and passing the “PA Fairness Act,” which would prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity; among several other reforms.  U.S. Rep. Dwight Evans–April 5, 2018The College of Liberal Arts hosted Congressman Dwight Evans to discuss healthy food access in Philadelphia. In Pennsylvania’s second congressional district, the area of Philadelphia that Evans represents, 26 percent of residents live in poverty and face a lack of access to healthy food options. Department of Geography and Urban Studies Adjunct Professor Amelia Duffy-Tumasz invited Evans to speak to students in her Food and Justice in the City course. While on campus, Evans also stopped by former Philadelphia Mayor John F. Street’s class.  Candidates for lieutenant governor–April 11, 2018Current Lt. Gov. Mike Stack, John Fetterman, Kathi Cozzone, Ray Sosa and Nina Ahmad—the Democratic candidates for lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania—participated in the Al Día Forum “Redefining the Office of Lt. Governor” at Kiva Auditorium. The forum was organized in collaboration with 6ABC and the Klein College of Media and Communication.  Former Vice President Joe Biden–April 11, 2018Former Vice President Joe Biden delivered a speech at the Temple Performing Arts Center as Main Campus Program Board’s Spring Celebrity Speaker. Biden spoke to students about leadership, sharing some examples of leaders who influenced his life and career.  Former First Lady Michelle Obama–May 2, 2018Michelle Obama, accompanied by a throng of celebrities including Nick Cannon, Ciara, Bradley Cooper, Robert De Niro, Questlove, Kelly Rowland and Zendaya, hosted 8,000 high school students from across Philadelphia to celebrate College Signing Day at the Liacouras Center.  Securities and Exchange Commission Chair Jay Clayton–May 2, 2018SEC Chair Jay Clayton visited Temple for a discussion, “The Evolving Markets for Retail Investment Services and Forward Looking Regulation,” at the Temple Performing Arts Center. The deans of the Beasley School of Law and the Fox School of Business jointly sponsored the event.  Philadelphia City Solicitor Marcel S. Pratt, LAW ’09–May 8, 2018Marcel S. Pratt, a 2009 graduate of the Beasley School of Law and current Philadelphia City Solicitor, returned to campus to be honored by the Law Review, a student-edited journal.  U.S. Sen. Cory Booker–May 10, 2018New Jersey native and U.S. Sen. Cory Booker will deliver the Commencement address to the Class of 2018 and be awarded an honorary degree at Temple’s 131st Commencement Ceremony. He joins Philadelphia Tribune President and CEO Robert Bogle and Visit Philadelphia President and CEO Meryl Levitz as this year’s honorary degree recipients. Main Campus is often a go-to location for events for politicians and celebrities. This semester, notable figures from the governor to the former First Lady visited Temple.


Students and faculty share thoughts on proposed multipurpose facility and stadium
Campus News
Subtitle: Findings show students are concerned about Temple’s North Philadelphia neighbors and faculty want more information about the project.  May 9, 2018As Temple continues to research and explore the impact of the proposed multipurpose facility, including an on-campus football stadium, gathering student and faculty feedback is an essential part of the process.Last month, Temple Student Government (TSG) collaborated with Institutional Research and Assessment to distribute a survey so students could share their thoughts about the proposed development. Also, the Faculty Senate took a vote on a three-part resolution.Here, we take a look at the results from the student survey and the faculty vote. One point to note in both results: Only a small percentage of students and faculty responded to their peers’ call for feedback.  STUDENT SURVEY RESULTS The survey was sent to nearly 38,000 undergraduate, graduate and professional students at Temple’s U.S. campuses. At the survey’s close in mid-April, in response to a question about support, 87.6 percent of students (33,077) did not respond, 6.6 percent (2,504) do not support building the multipurpose facility, 3.6 percent (1,356) do support it and 1.3 percent (506) are neutral. Less than one percent (324) of students chose not to answer this question, but answered other questions on the survey. The greatest concern among students who oppose the project is how this development would affect neighbors. Nearly 70 percent of that group are concerned about the impact the proposed multipurpose facility could have on the communities surrounding campus.Also, approximately 61 percent of survey participants somewhat disagree or strongly disagree that Temple students have a good relationship with their neighbors. A majority of students think they could be more mindful about trash and noise levels in the community that Temple shares with longtime residents. Creating the best student experience—on and off campus—is a priority. Through the survey, the university was able to discover which aspects of the proposed facility students think would be most beneficial for campus life and the university. Students were asked to rank various reasons for supporting the facility from one to five—a majority shared that their top two reasons are that the development would be more cost-effective than playing at Lincoln Financial Field, and that football game attendance would improve. Students also think campus visits would increase. Learn more by viewing the full survey report.  FACULTY SENATE VOTE The Faculty Senate is a group of full-time faculty and librarians from all the university’s schools and colleges. The group acts as advisors to the administration and the Board of Trustees, and the president and provost are ex-officio members.  In late February, the group hosted a special meeting during which President Englert presented information and answered questions about the proposed multipurpose facility.  The Faculty Senate passed a resolution: They’re requesting the Board of Trustees changes its decision to apply for project approval through the Philadelphia Planning Commission. They want more information about the project to be available to all members of the Temple community and neighbors. They would like to see a joint faculty and administration task force created to review potential health risks that football players may face.  There are 2,292 full-time faculty and librarians across the university. Of this total, approximately 495 members, or 22 percent, submitted ballots.The results show that 375 (16.4 percent) of members supported the resolution, 106 (4.6 percent) did not, 14 members (0.6 percent) voted to abstain, and the largest number, 1,797 (78.4 percent) did not vote. As the university continues to solicit feedback from all members of our community, you are encouraged to be a part of the ongoing conversation about the proposed facility. To share your thoughts on the project, email [email protected]  Earlier this month, Temple students were invited to fill out a survey about the project, and Faculty Senate members were encouraged to vote in support or opposition of the group’s resolution.


State lawmakers honor Rhodes Scholar during Owls on the Hill Day
Campus News
Subtitle: Each year, Temple students travel to the state capital to advocate for continued funding of Temple during Owls on the Hill Day. This year, Hazim Hardeman, Temple’s first Rhodes Scholar, received a special honor. April 24, 2018Temple students, many wearing red- and white-striped rugby shirts, fanned out across the Pennsylvania State Capitol April 17 as part of the annual Owls on the Hill Day. The students traveled by bus to Harrisburg, where they were joined by fellow students participating in the Capital Semester Program, to advocate for continued funding to Temple from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.   Armed with packets of materials highlighting Temple’s impact on the state, a university fact sheet and a copy of Temple magazine’s recent issue spotlighting Hazim Hardeman, KLN ’17, Temple’s first Rhodes Scholar, the students visited legislative offices to meet with members of the Pennsylvania General Assembly and their staffs.   Hardeman, who grew up near Temple’s Main Campus, was also in in the Capitol for Owls on the Hill Day. He met with legislative and administration officials, including House Democratic Leader Frank Dermody, Democratic Appropriation Chair Joseph Markosek and Pennsylvania Department of Education Executive Deputy Secretary David Volkman. Hardeman was also formally recognized in the Pennsylvania House and Senate.   In the House, the citation honoring Hardeman was introduced by Rep. Vanessa Lowery Brown (D-190), who at one time participated in Temple’s Center for Social Policy and Community Development New Choice New Options programs; Rep. Thomas Murt, EDU ’17, whose district includes Temple’s Ambler campus and who recently earned his doctorate from Temple; and Rep. W. Curtis Thomas, EDU ’76, whose district includes the university. Senate recognition of Hardeman was co-sponsored by Sen. Sharif Street, whose district includes Temple’s Main and Health Sciences campuses, and Sen. John Rafferty, LAW ’88.   In addition to visiting with members of the General Assembly, the Temple students also met with Lt. Gov. Michael Stack, a member of the university’s Board of Trustees; toured the House chamber, where they met state representatives Joanna McClinton, who also teaches in the Beasley School of Law; Morgan Cephas; Harry Readshaw; and Michael Peifer, who also chairs the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency’s board of directors; and toured the Governor’s Reception Room, where they reenacted a bill signing.   A Temple student shakes hands with Lt. Gov. Mike Stack during Owls on the Hill Day. (PHOTO: Ryan S. Brandenberg)   While the students were advocating in person at the Capitol, Temple faculty, staff and alumni showed their support of the students’ advocacy by emailing their Pennsylvania legislators through TALON (Temple Advocates Legislative Outreach Network).   “Owls on the Hill Day is an important opportunity for the members of the General Assembly to personally meet and hear from the students they are investing in with commonwealth dollars,” said George Kenney, Temple’s associate vice president and senior advisor for government affairs. “It is these students telling their personal stories that really illustrates why Pennsylvania should continue its longtime investment in Temple University.” —Preston Moretz Hazim Hardeman received special recognition during the annual day of advocacy Temple students organize in Harrisburg.


U.S. Sen. Cory Booker among this year’s honorary degree recipients
Campus News
Subtitle: Booker, who will speak at Commencement, joins Philadelphia Tribune President and CEO Robert Bogle and Visit Philadelphia President and CEO Meryl Levitz in this year’s group of honorary degree recipients.  April 18, 2018New Jersey native and U.S. Sen. Cory Booker will address the Class of 2018 at Temple’s 131st Commencement ceremony next month.During the May 10 celebration, the respected senator, known for his lifelong public service and community involvement, will also receive an honorary degree alongside Robert Bogle, president and CEO of The Philadelphia Tribune, and Meryl Levitz, president and CEO of Visit Philadelphia.Temple has bestowed nearly 900 honorary degrees throughout its history upon leaders from many backgrounds and fields whose achievements exemplify the university’s ideals and mission.“Commencement is a time where we celebrate the extraordinary achievements of our students, and pay tribute to great role models,” said Temple University President Richard M. Englert. “This year, we honor three people whose work in their communities echoes Temple’s own commitment to community engagement.”U.S. Sen. Cory BookerPrior to earning his seat and becoming the first black U.S. senator for New Jersey, Booker served two successful terms as mayor of Newark.While at Stanford University as an undergraduate, Booker oversaw a counseling center and student-run crisis hotline. While pursuing his law degree at Yale University, he volunteered with Big Brothers Big Sisters; was a member of the Black Law Students Association and operated a free legal clinic for low-income area residents. While at Stanford, he also was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship that allowed him to go on to study at the University of Oxford, where he earned a degree in history.Time and again, Booker proves himself a true public servant, putting community health, safety and education at the forefront of his work, in addition to championing women’s rights, environmental preservation and nationwide technological innovation.Booker’s visit to campus for Commencement won’t be his first: He spoke at the 2014 memorial service for his friend, the late Trustee Lewis Katz, for whom Temple’s medical school is named.Robert BogleIn his nearly 50 years with The Philadelphia Tribune—America’s oldest and the Greater Philadelphia region’s largest daily newspaper serving the African American community—Bogle held nearly every position at the iconic publication before becoming its chairman, president and CEO.In addition to his role at the newspaper, Bogle is an active member of several professional, civic and social organizations in Philadelphia, including the African-American Chamber of Commerce, the Hospitals and Higher Education Facilities Authority, the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Philadelphia Orchestra Association and the Zoological Society. He has served as chairman of the Cheyney University Council of Trustees for more than two decades.Bogle’s extensive work on behalf of the entire local community exemplifies Temple’s mission to provide opportunities for all students, regardless of status or situation in life.Meryl LevitzSince moving to Philadelphia in 1971, Levitz felt its potential—an instinct she’s acted on since in her role as founding president and CEO of Visit Philadelphia, one of the city’s most active tourism organizations. Under her leadership, Philadelphia and its surrounding counties have quickly become a top-rated travel destination.Among her many achievements for Philadelphia, Levitz co-founded the Center City Proprietors Association, oversaw the opening of the Great Plaza at Penn’s Landing, and co-directed the opening of the Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Reading Terminal Market. In January, Levitz announced she would be stepping down from Visit Philadelphia at the end of this calendar year.Levitz and her organization's integral role in Philadelphia's development and growth align with Temple's commitment to the city it calls home.In addition, the School of Social Work will award an honorary degree to Toni Oliver, who earned a master's in social work from Temple and has devoted her career to empowering people of color. She currently serves as president of the National Association of Black Social Workers.In 1992, she founded the ROOTS Adoption Agency to improve the adoption outcomes of African American children in foster care, and has served as president of J. T. Oliver & Associates, a child welfare training and consultation firm based in Atlanta.Visit temple.edu/commencement for up-to-date information and a livestream of Temple’s 131st Commencement ceremony exercises May 10. -Nicole Quaste  Booker will address the graduates of the Class of 2018, while two local leaders will also receive honorary degrees.


Best reactions to Temple “T” April Fools’ Day joke
Campus News
Subtitle: The Temple community has strong feelings about its beloved logo, and people didn’t hesitate to share their thoughts about our “new” logo, via social media.   April 4, 2018Coming off our best-joke-of-all-time high, we have a couple things we want to say. First, it was incredible to see how many of our Owls are loyal to our “T”. Also, we’re sorry to all of the people we stressed out. It was worth it, though, because some of your reactions were seriously amazing. Check out 10 of our favorite reaction tweets from our April Fools’ Day joke. [tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:0:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:1:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:2:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:3:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:5:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:4:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:6:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:7:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:8:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:9:value] Read more reactions from our Facebook and Instagram pages. The Temple community responded in numbers on social media to the university’s logo prank.


Best April Fools' Day reactions
Campus News
April 4, 2018[tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:0:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:1:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:2:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:3:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:5:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:4:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:6:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:7:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:8:value][tu_social_embed_twitter:tu_social_embed_tweet_url:9:value] 


How the Temple “T” came to be
Campus News
Subtitle: The history of the university’s iconic logo is rooted in student innovation and success.  April 1, 2018More than 30 years ago, a group of students from Tyler School of Art took a deep breath before walking into a presentation that would forever change their lives and Temple University itself.Current President Richard M. Englert was there, in an executive administrator role. Then President Peter Liacouras was there, too. It was 1983, and there was an exciting topic on the meeting agenda: A new logo for the university.  Several students from a graphic arts and design class worked to create three different options for the new logo to celebrate Temple’s upcoming 100th anniversary. The meeting would decide which design reigned supreme and would become a part of the university’s identity.We all know which design was chosen.The Temple “T” represents strength and positive character. Its open ends are symbolic of the free exchange of ideas that is the hallmark of a Temple education. Now, it’s universally recognized as the iconic symbol of Temple University.“Every time I see it now, I swell with pride. When I see it, I see greatness and excellence and creativity and innovation,” said Englert in his 2016 State of the University address. “Knowing that it was designed by Temple students under the guidance of a Temple professor in a Temple academic classroom in Temple’s nationally renowned art school makes it all the more special.”We all love the Temple “T”. Learn how to love our logo the right way by reviewing our official logo usage guidelines.   The history of the university’s iconic logo is rooted in student innovation and success.


Temple to adopt significant changes to iconic "T" logo
Campus News
Subtitle: An interdisciplinary task force worked to create an updated logo that is more representative of the university’s momentum.  April 1, 2018On April 1, after nearly a year of universitywide collaboration, Temple revealed changes to its official logo.The new logo will be a lowercase serif “t” to more accurately represent the Temple of today—an ever-evolving, world-class institution.“The university community advocated for a logo that was more modern,” said Associate Vice President of Strategic Marketing and Communications Emily Spitale. “We’re attracting and retaining renowned faculty. Groundbreaking research is happening here. We just had our first Rhodes Scholar. It’s time for a modern logo to show that we are, and have been, an institution on the move.”The new logo will be immediately adopted on Temple’s digital properties, and a three-phase rollout will launch this summer. Phase one will focus on Main Campus updates; phase two will include signage on U.S. campuses, including Center City, Ambler and Harrisburg; and phase three will address international campuses.A rendering shows how the updated logo will appear on Morgan Hall. Main Campus logo updates are projected to start June 1, 2018. A task force comprising university leadership, faculty, staff, students and alumni formed last year to address rising concerns around Temple’s official logo. Through research, the group found that a lowercase “t” connects more strongly with Temple’s mission of making a high-quality education accessible for all.“I came to Temple because, for the first time in my life, I felt like my dreams could actually be achieved,” said Temple University Young Alumni President Darin Bartholomew, FOX ’14,’17. “Our logo should reflect that empowerment—no matter how small you start, at Temple anything is possible.”Beyond the emotional connection to a lowercase “t”, a recent study conducted by the Linguistic Society of America discovered that age groups 18–24 and 50–62 respond more positively to type in lowercase.“Our goals are to continue recruiting high-quality students and to increase alumni engagement,” Spitale said. “When making decisions we always rely on research, and the numbers don’t lie—our target audiences want their ‘t’ lowercase.”   The new logo will be a lowercase serif “t” to more accurately represent the Temple of today—an ever-evolving, world-class institution.


Temple receives second “It’s On Us PA” grant to further improve sexual misconduct reporting
Campus News
Subtitle: Temple hosted Pennsylvania Secretary of Education Pedro Rivera for the announcement of “It’s On Us” grants for 39 colleges and universities across the state. March 26, 2018Temple received its second grant of more than $25,000 to combat sexual assault on its campuses, both domestic and international, after Pennsylvania selected the university as one of it’s “It’s On Us PA” grant recipients for 2018.   Temple’s grant is part of nearly $1 million in funds earmarked in the 2017-2018 state budget by Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration for the campaign. The university is among 39 colleges and universities across the state to be selected for an “It’s On PA Us” grant.    “The ‘It’s On Us PA’ campaign is helping Pennsylvania schools lead their communities in directing the conversation on how we can prevent assaults and harassment from infecting our campuses and communities,” state Secretary of Education Pedro A. Rivera said at a news conference at Temple on March 13.   [node:sidebar_text]   The “It’s On Us” initiative at Temple seeks to improve education and increase support for students by raising awareness and reporting of incidents of sexual assault. “It’s On Us PA,” modeled on the national “It’s On Us” program, was the first state-level initiative launched after former President Barack Obama and former Vice President Joe Biden started the campaign in 2014.   Temple received its first “It’s On Us” grant last year to support focus groups, universitywide educational campaigns, an anonymous online reporting system, and population-specific marketing materials for Title IX and counseling services at Temple. The specific student populations who may face barriers to reporting that we targeted via last year’s grant include students of color, international students, students with a disability and LGBTQIA+ students.   This year’s funding will expand the successes of the first grant to support efforts on all Temple campuses, domestic and international.   Alexandra Schmied, a senior studying public health and a peer educator at the Wellness Resource Center, has been working with fellow students to prevent and address sexual violence on campus.    “As a Temple student, I’m glad that all students on all Temple campuses will have more resources to help them understand sexual misconduct and how to report instances of these violations, and have access to support services and resources,” Schmied said.   April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Join events on campus. The grant of more than $25,000 will go toward initiatives to raise awareness and improve reporting of campus sexual assault.


Temple generates $7.5 billion in economic impact throughout Pennsylvania
Campus News
Subtitle: Temple is a significant economic engine for both Philadelphia and Pennsylvania.  March 22, 2018Temple is a significant economic engine for both the City of Philadelphia and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Combined, Temple and Temple University Health System’s impact on the state’s economy exceeded $7.5 billion in 2017, supporting more than 43,000 jobs statewide and generating $205 million in tax revenue for the state, according to an economic impact study the university recently commissioned.   Combined, Temple University and Temple Health generate more than $4.7 billion in operations revenue throughout Pennsylvania, with $4 billion specifically in the Philadelphia region. Wage premium, which estimates the impact from additional household income and spending in the economy, totals $2.1 billion in Pennsylvania, of which $419 million is in Philadelphia. Ancillary spending equates to $443 million in Pennsylvania and $359 million in Philadelphia, and capital spending equals $175 million in Pennsylvania and $153 million in Philadelphia.    “We are certainly proud of the economic impact Temple has on our city and state, but the true value of our university is in the nearly 28,000 students we educate who are Pennsylvania residents and the 175,000 alumni who live and work in the state,” President Richard M. Englert said. “Add to that our transformative research, health care and community engagement initiatives, and it’s evident how much Temple contributes to our region and beyond.”   Offering more than 400 degree programs, Temple is a vital institution in Philadelphia and throughout the region. The university sets the standard for urban research universities in accessibility, affordability, diversity, engagement and excellence. Beyond its academic and research offerings, Temple makes a significant impact fiscally by generating substantial revenue that has a spillover impact on the city, region and state in the form of employment, expenditures and taxes.    Temple’s impact is not just economic. The university also provides significant social benefits to the surrounding community, making it an important asset in North Philadelphia and throughout the city. In 2015, students completed more than 178,000 hours of volunteer service, providing more than $4 million in value to the community.    Beyond service, the university creates job opportunities, employing nearly 4,000 local residents on its Main and Health Sciences campuses in North Philadelphia, and providing job training and educational opportunities through more than two dozen workforce development programs, including the recently opened Workforce Connections Hub. In addition, Temple University Hospital last year provided about $68 million in charity and under-reimbursed care to the patients it serves. Temple University Health System’s hospitals together provided about $82 million.   “Temple is Philadelphia’s public university, and we take great pride in having a substantial educational, social and economic impact that cares for our communities and helps drive our city and state forward,” Englert said. Temple has supported 43,000 jobs statewide and generated more than $205 million in tax revenue for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.


Graduate programs earn increases in U.S. News & World Report rankings
Campus News
Subtitle: Several Temple programs rose in the latest graduate school rankings, with the Lewis Katz School of Medicine and the College of Science and Technology recording double-digit jumps. March 22, 2018Temple graduate programs made a strong showing in the latest U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate Schools rankings, recording increases on eight lists in disciplines including law, math, medicine and social work, among others.   The most dramatic increase for a Temple program in this year’s rankings, the 2019 edition, was earned by the Lewis Katz School of Medicine, which moved up 15 spots since last year, from No. 84 to No. 69 on the Best Medical Schools: Primary Care list. Temple’s medical school once again ranked on the top half of the list of best schools for research.    Temple’s Beasley School of Law, another school that has ascended in recent years, leapt six spots overall this year to No. 47, with its trial advocacy program remaining ranked No. 2 and its part-time law program remaining ranked No. 6 in the nation.    College of Science and Technology programs also made significant gains in the latest rankings, with mathematics jumping 13 spots since it was last ranked in 2015. Computer science and physics also ascended on their lists by 10 and three spots, respectively.   Temple’s College of Education, which jumped seven spots in last year’s rankings, held strong, remaining in the top 20 percent of graduate schools of education.   Temple’s College of Engineering and College of Public Health also made gains, with electrical engineering ascending seven spots since last year and social work leaping five spots since it was last ranked in the 2016 edition.   Other Temple programs ranked in the top 100 nationally, including bioengineering, computer engineering, health care law and international law.    U.S. News does not rank all programs on its Best Graduate Schools list every year. The 2019 edition left out some programs that are traditionally areas of strength for Temple, including fine arts and some public health programs. The Lewis Katz School of Medicine and the College of Science and Technology recorded double-digit jumps in the latest rankings.


In recognition of $10M gift, Temple’s new library to be named for Steve Charles
Campus News
Subtitle: Charles Library, to open next year, will carry the name of the trustee and philanthropist. March 13, 2018Temple’s new library—which will become the stunning centerpiece of Main Campus—will be named Charles Library in recognition of a $10 million gift from entrepreneur and university trustee Steve Charles, KLN '80.   Charles’s gift—one of the largest individual contributions in Temple history—will be invested into an endowment to provide perpetual funding for Temple Libraries to attract and retain high-quality faculty and staff; maintain and enhance Charles Library; promote community outreach, partnerships and public programs; purchase and preserve materials and collections; and support technology and innovation.   “Steve’s gift is transformational in supporting Temple’s goal of building a 21st century library that will redefine campus life, sustain Charles Library at its optimal level and care for all of the valuable resources it will provide,” said Board of Trustees Chair Patrick J. O’Connor, who led the board in formally accepting the gift Tuesday.   There are natural alignments between Charles Library, a strikingly original structure designed by the world-class architectural firm Snøhetta, and the alumnus whose name it will carry. Upon transferring to Temple from Lancaster County, Charles graduated with a degree in advertising and co-founded immixGroup, Inc., which helps technology companies do business with the federal government. He sold the firm in 2015 but still serves as a consultant.   Charles Library, set to open in May 2019, will feature technology such as high-performance computation that supports advanced research. It will also include a space-saving automated book retrieval system that will store most of the library’s volumes and create more space for collaboration.   Located at the intersection of Temple’s two primary pedestrian pathways, Liacouras and Polett walks, the building will be the academic and social core of campus life.   “Charles Library will amplify our scholarly mission by attracting various intellectual communities to a bold new building full of flexible learning spaces that can respond to the needs of the moment,” President Richard M. Englert said. “We are proud that this catalyst for collaboration will be named for Steve Charles.”   Steve Charles (Photo: Joseph V. Labolito)   In 2011, Charles established the Stephen G. Charles Scholarship Fund in the Klein College of Media and Communication. Four years later, he joined Klein College’s Board of Visitors and committed $2 million to establish the Steve Charles Chair in Media, Cities and Solutions, a position held by prominent scholar and social commentator Marc Lamont Hill. It was the college’s first academic chair endowed by an individual donor and, at the time, the largest one-time gift in college history.   In 2016, he joined Temple’s Board of Trustees and helped lead the fundraising effort to name Klein College (then the School of Media and Communication) for broadcast pioneer Lew Klein. Most recently, he committed funding for various prizes for the next three years of the Be Your Own Boss Bowl business plan competition in the Fox School of Business.   “Opportunity and innovation occur at the intersection of disciplines,” Charles said. “I live by this idea, and the vision for the library embodies it as the place where students can collaborate in the latest ways. I hope alumni and friends will join me in supporting this project in the months ahead.”   Charles added that he is excited about the various ways in which the building will promote sustainability, such as stormwater management systems and a green roof that will be one of the largest in the state.   Charles’s gift to Temple Libraries follows a $1 million gift to name The Albert M. Greenfield Special Collections Research Center Reading Room on the first floor of the new library and to provide long-term funding to maintain that space.   Dean of Libraries Joseph Lucia said Charles Library will inspire Temple students and “provide a rich context” to connect them more deeply to one another for learning, conversation and creative work.   “Charles Library is a unique architectural presence on campus that will require continued investment to operate at its highest potential,” Lucia said. “Steve’s gift provides the financial capacity over the long term to achieve an endowment level that is liberating, exciting and a huge vote of confidence in Temple’s future. We couldn’t be more grateful.” <iframe width="800" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PNYo3pE4LjU" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>Charles Library, to open next year, will carry the name of the trustee and philanthropist.


President highlights Temple’s value in testimony to state lawmakers
Campus News
Subtitle: Vital state funding helps keep in-state tuition low. February 28, 2018Temple University President Richard M. Englert told state legislators on Tuesday that their support is vital to help Temple offer a high-quality education at an affordable price.    The president testified in Harrisburg before members of the state Senate Appropriations Committee to make the case for more than $150 million Temple receives in state funding. He told legislators the university works hard to ensure the money goes directly to supporting Pennsylvania students.   “Not having this subsidy would drive up tuition for Pennsylvania students,” Englert said. He explained the university uses the commonwealth appropriation and leverages it into a nearly $12,000 discount for state residents. That discount would disappear if the state stopped supporting Temple.   “When compared with tuition rates from private colleges and universities, which run between $40,000 and $50,000 a year, Temple is a great value,” he said in prepared testimony for the committee.   Gov. Tom Wolf has proposed keeping Temple’s appropriation at $150.6 million for the fiscal year that starts July 1. The other state-related research universities–Pitt and Penn State–have also been kept at previous year’s levels. The fourth state-related school, Lincoln University, has fewer reserves and is in line to receive a bump in support.   Englert said the university uses a three-prong technique to keep tuition down: maintaining as low a tuition rate as possible, investing in financial aid for those who need help, and supporting the Fly in 4 program. Fly in 4 is designed to ensure students leave with as little debt as possible, Englert said.    “Four years ago, Temple broke ground by giving students real incentives to graduate in four years or less. We know that the longer students stay in school, the more debt they accumulate,” the president explained in written testimony.   “Temple made an agreement with its students: If they met with academic advisors, registered early for classes and stayed on track, we would pay for any classes they needed at the end of four years,” he said.   The first cohort of Fly in 4 students will graduate this spring, and Englert said it’s clear there will be a growth in those who are successfully leaving Temple in four years. With the graduation rate going up, the amount of debt students carry is declining, compared with students from previous years.    “What that means is simple: Fly in 4 is doing its job to keep students focused on on-time graduation,” Englert said. Not only that, 124 Fly in 4 students who began at Temple in fall 2014 have graduated early.   In answers to questions, Englert explained that Temple works hard to be a valuable member of the North Philadelphia community, offering everything from nearly $70 million in unreimbursed health care to a plethora of initiatives like those in the public schools and job readiness.   “You get so much for your investment with these institutions,” Englert told legislators. “This is a more than 50-year partnership. It is working. We want to keep it going.”   This is the only formal public hearing for state-related schools, but Englert said he would continue to talk with elected leaders about the university’s impact on the commonwealth. Those conversations are vital for making the case for Temple’s students, he said.   Legislators have until June 30 to enact a budget. Vital state funding helps keep in-state tuition low.


The Albert M. Greenfield Foundation makes historic $1M gift to Temple Libraries
Campus News
Subtitle: The gift will support The Albert M. Greenfield Special Collections Research Center Reading Room in Temple’s new library, slated to open in 2019. February 21, 2018A historic $1 million gift from The Albert M. Greenfield Foundation will support the Special Collections Research Center in Temple’s state-of-the-art library, set to open next year.   The gift—the largest commitment in Temple Libraries’ history—will name The Albert M. Greenfield Special Collections Research Center Reading Room on the first floor of the new library and provide long-term funding to maintain the space.   “This major gift from The Albert M. Greenfield Foundation will honor Mr. Greenfield’s enduring legacy by linking his name to our incredible new special collections facilities in perpetuity and helping ensure that these facilities will operate at their full promise,” Dean of Libraries Joseph Lucia said. “This transformative gift will allow Mr. Greenfield’s spirit of philanthropy to live on in the generations of students whose learning it supports and inspires.”   Greenfield, who created the foundation that bears his name in 1953, was a Philadelphia and national business, civic and philanthropic leader who made a significant and lasting impact on the city. His contributions are documented in the Temple University Archives, Temple Libraries’ Urban Archives and the Philadelphia Jewish Archives. The foundation’s gift will extend his legacy, helping to educate current and future generations of students, community members and researchers on the city’s history.   From 1927 to 1947, Greenfield served as a member of Temple’s Board of Trustees.   “This gift to the new library recognizes Albert M. Greenfield’s long history of supporting Temple University and his belief in its important educational mission,” said Priscilla M. Luce, president of The Albert M. Greenfield Foundation.   Temple’s new library will be a dynamic and innovative space dedicated to broadening learning, inspiring creativity and building community. Through its design, the library will offer a variety of forward-thinking, technologically sophisticated spaces; employ a variety of strategies for storing, accessing and preserving the library’s robust special collections; and provide dedicated programmatic spaces.   Funding opportunities for this transformative project—that will benefit Temple, the Greater Philadelphia region and beyond—are available at the Temple Libraries website. The gift will name a reading room in Temple’s future library after the business, civic and philanthropic leader.


FAQ: Fox School of Business MBA rankings
Campus News
February 2, 2018What happened? The Fox School of Business self-reported it had found inaccurate data it had submitted to U.S. News & World Report for its rankings of the 2018 Best Online MBA Programs. As a result, U.S. News removed the Fox Online MBA program’s No. 1 national ranking and moved the program to its “unranked” category for 2018. In light of the recently discovered issue with data for the Online MBA program, and out of respect for the U.S. News rankings, Fox Dean M. Moshe Porat has withdrawn the Part-Time and Full-Time Global MBA programs from consideration as well in U.S. News’ upcoming Best Graduate Programs rankings.   What is the next step? Temple University President Richard M. Englert announced an independent review of the data reporting processes the Fox School of Business uses for U.S. News’ annual rankings. The independent firm, Jones Day, a global law firm with substantial experience in such reviews in higher education, has already begun its work. The work should take about 60 days.   What other details about the review are available? Dean Porat has pledged Fox’s full support of the independent review process. He and President Englert are confident in the strengths of all Fox MBA programs and the incredible quality of the Fox students and faculty.   Does this incident penalize the Fox School moving forward? The three Fox MBA programs will remain unranked for 2018. However, every effort will be made to ensure that the Fox Online, Part-Time and Global MBA programs are eligible for inclusion in the U.S. News 2019 Best Online Programs and Best Graduate Programs rankings.   Does this change the quality of a Fox education? No. This is very important: The Fox MBA programs have not changed. The school’s focus remains on the delivery of high-impact and high-quality programs and student services. In no way is this a reflection of the school’s accredited academic work, its award-winning faculty, its highly accomplished students or its world-class programs.   Said Porat: “Rankings are a byproduct of quality, and our focus will remain where it always has—on delivering high-quality programs and service to our students.”   And as President Englert said, “Over its 100-year history, the Fox School has earned its reputation as a world-class business school with graduates who thrive in their careers and who give back to their communities.”   Will this alter the Fox MBA program tuition rates? No. The programs remain among the nation’s best values in graduate business education.   How have employers reacted? The Fox School has developed strong ties to industry partners in the last quarter century, as a result of Dean Porat’s commitment to developing industry-ready students and the creation of the school’s Center for Student Professional Development. The Fox School’s curriculum is market-driven and requires continuous engagement with employers worldwide in order to map curriculum to real-world skills and industry needs. The school will continue to honor this commitment to the market.   Does this affect the Fox School’s accreditation? No. The Fox School remains accredited by AACSB, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, a distinction that is held by fewer than 5 percent of the world’s business schools and one that the Fox School has maintained continuously since 1934. Answers to some frequently asked questions about the Fox School of Business' MBA program rankings.


Library collection memorializes founder Russell Conwell
Campus News
Subtitle: The Conwell Collection houses personal belongings of the university’s founder. February 13, 2018[node:video] Temple recognizes Russell Conwell’s Feb. 15 birthday annually, but his legacy can be seen and felt year-round. So too can his belongings. [node:sidebar_text] Paley Library’s Conwell Collection, part of the Urban Archives in the Special Collections Research Center, houses the university founder’s documents and belongings. Among the possessions are his sword, letters, speeches, desk and chairs, as well as a death mask (not a typo). The mask, a plaster mold of Conwell’s face, was made upon his death in 1925. His desk and chairs can be seen on the mezzanine in Paley. The library has also put up a two-case exhibit celebrating Conwell, which will be on display until August.  <iframe width="800" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uKgk16mm1to" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>Among the possessions is Conwell’s “death mask.”


Owls join celebration of Eagles' Super Bowl win
Campus News
Subtitle: The Owls were out in full force during Thursday's parade to celebrate the Philadelphia Eagles' Super Bowl victory. Relive the day through photos.  February 12, 2018Philadelphia became one big party on Thursday, as hundreds of thousands of people came together to celebrate the Philadelphia Eagles' Super Bowl win during a victory parade through the city. Many Owls joined their fellow birds to celebrate the victory. Relive the parade in photos, from Broad and Cecil B. to City Hall to the Parkway. Students wear their Eagles gear on Main Campus before heading to the Super Bowl victory parade. (Photo: Joseph V. Labolito) Students wait for the Broad Street Line to head to the Eagles parade Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018. (Photo: Joseph V. Labolito) Eagles fans wait at the Cecil B. Moore/Temple University stop on the Broad Street Line. (Photo: Betsy Manning) Fans pack the Broad Street Line subway. (Photo: Ryan S. Brandenberg) A Super Bowl battle cry is written in the sky above City Hall. (Photo: Betsy Manning) Eagles fans gather on North Broad Street during Thursday's Super Bowl victory parade. (Photo: Betsy Manning) Eagles fans climb a statue for a better vantage point as "Philly" is written in the sky behind them. (Photo: Ryan S. Brandenberg) The bus carrying the Lombardi Trophy passes through Center City during Thursday's Eagles victory parade. (Photo: Joseph V. Labolito) Philadelphia Eagles players salute fans during their Super Bowl victory parade. (Photo: Joseph V. Labolito) A furry Eagles fan stays warm during the Super Bowl parade. (Photo: Betsy Manning) An Owl among Eagles fans. (Photo: Betsy Manning) A fan keeps warm. (Photo: Ryan S. Brandenberg) A woman is overcome with emotion during the Eagles Super Bowl celebration. (Photo: Ryan S. Brandenberg) The American flag goes green for the Eagles. (Photo: Ryan S. Brandenberg) Fans show their spirit through "underdog" masks and Eagles gear. (Photo: Betsy Manning) A fan hangs from a tree in the parade crowd. (Photo: Ryan S. Brandenberg) A little boy sports Eagles face paint. (Photo: Betsy Manning) Philadelphia Police officers show their Eagles spirit. (Photo: Joseph V. Labolito) Confetti flies during the Super Bowl parade. (Photo: Joseph V. Labolito)  Fans await the arrival of the Eagles outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art. (Photo: Ryan S. Brandenberg) Owls were out in full force during the parade to celebrate the Eagles' Super Bowl victory. Relive the day in photos.


Temple to open food pantry to serve university community
Campus News
Subtitle: The pantry is slated to open in the Howard Gittis Student Center in February. January 29, 2018 In an effort to better support its students' basic needs, Temple University plans to open a food pantry on campus in February, joining more than 560 other colleges and universities nationwide that provide food to students via pantries.    A task force formed by President Richard M. Englert and Provost JoAnne A. Epps in November to address food insecurity and related issues made the recommendation to establish the pantry. They were responding to a recent survey that showed that roughly 35 percent of Temple's undergraduate students experience "low" or "very low" food security, as assessed by a 10-item module developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and used around the world. College of Education Professor Sara Goldrick-Rab worked with her team at the Wisconsin HOPE Lab and Temple's Office of Institutional Research and Assessment to field the survey online in early fall 2017.   [node:pullquote]   "We have several areas where students come to us and talk about challenges they're facing, and food insecurity is one of those challenges," Vice President for Student Affairs Theresa Powell said. "It was often a matter of 'I owe rent, my bills are past due and I need to buy books, so I don't have enough money for food.' People will generally give up something they think they can give up--like food. And they don't really have a choice--they have to pay utilities, and they have to have a place to live."   Temple's food pantry is slated to open on the second floor of the Howard Gittis Student Center Feb. 19. Students will be able to visit the pantry and select items they need free of charge.   The pantry's opening will coincide with a Feb. 19 event, "Combat Campus Hunger," slated to take place at the Rad Dish Co-op Cafe in Ritter Hall at 7 p.m. Feb. 19.    The pantry will begin operating a few days a week, then open for longer hours if needed, Powell said. It will initially be supported through campus food drives and an OwlCrowd campaign launched by student organization Challah for Hunger, but will eventually look to partner with local organizations such as Philabundance and SHARE Food Program.    [node:sidebar_text]   This was the first time Temple students were surveyed about food insecurity, and more than 2,300 undergraduate students participated. Students did not take the survey in order to raise awareness of food insecurity; rather, the broad survey was about their college experience. Within it, the USDA module assessed if, while working and going to college, students also suffered from a lack of reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food.    Because many higher education institutions across the U.S. have never surveyed their students on food insecurity, Goldrick-Rab said it's difficult to say definitively how Temple's numbers compare. "But my gut is that these numbers are similar to those at other urban universities," she said, adding that the number of students who are food insecure at community colleges is estimated to be roughly 56 percent.   "This isn't about eating pizza when you want to eat sushi or about eating ramen or rice and beans most days. This is about running out of food that you need because you don't have enough money," explained Goldrick-Rab, a leading voice on college access and affordability who recently penned an op-ed on food insecurity in the New York Times. "Some people have endured food insecurity for so long that they're getting used to it. They don't feel hunger anymore because they're so used to it, but it impairs their academic performance."    Goldrick-Rab said there are a number of reasons that food insecurity has become a major issue for college students nationally, including soaring tuition rates, decreasing financial aid for students, dwindling state support for public institutions and increasingly stringent requirements to qualify for food assistance programs.   "Temple is a place where people can get college degrees even if they weren't born into wealth," she said. "That means when a student falls short, they can't expect their family to take care of it. That's why we need to help each other."    Goldrick-Rab added that a campus food pantry is a good first step in starting a conversation about addressing the larger problems that contribute to food insecurity. It's why she helped bring the College and University Food Bank Alliance and its director, Clare Cady, to Temple last year, and why she recently supported a new emergency aid fund on campus.    "If we're going to educate students, we need to take care of students," Powell said. "We want students to come to Temple, we want to retain those students and we want them to graduate. It's important for us to do all that we can to help them be successful, and this is a very simple part of helping students to realize their dreams."   Temple is a place where people can get college degrees even if they weren’t born into wealth. That means when a student falls short, they can’t expect their family to take care of it. That’s why we need to help each other.”Sara Goldrick-Rab, professorThe pantry is set to open in the Howard Gittis Student Center in February.


Temple performs most lung transplants of any hospital in U.S.
Campus News
Subtitle: Temple University Hospital performed 131 lung transplants in 2017, making it the highest-volume lung transplant program in the nation, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing. January 22, 2018Temple University Hospital performed 131 lung transplants in 2017, making it the No. 1 volume lung transplant program in the nation, according to new data from the United Network for Organ Sharing.   Temple’s lung transplant volume has grown steadily in recent years, increasing to 131 last year from five transplants in 2011.   “Since 2011, we have recruited top talent and made significant process and protocol improvements,” said Verdi J. DiSesa, president and chief executive officer of TUH. “To reach this level in such a short period of time is nothing short of extraordinary. This truly is a demonstration of the talent and dedication of our transplant team and a measure of our commitment to serve patients who are in need of highly skilled, complex care.”    Since Temple’s Lung Transplantation Program was established in 1994, 669 transplants have been performed at the hospital. The nationally recognized Temple Lung Center, which treats tens of thousands of patients annually, specializes in treatment of both common and complex lung issues, including asthma, emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis, lung cancer, sarcoidosis, pneumonia and pulmonary hypertension.    Its Sarcoidosis Program was recently designated as an official World Association for Sarcoidosis and Other Granulomatous Disorders Sarcoidosis Clinic, making it the only institution in Pennsylvania and one of 27 worldwide to earn that designation.    “The collective achievements of the Temple Lung Center and the transplant team embody Temple’s commitment to building the best pulmonary program in the nation,” DiSesa said.   Temple University Hospital performed 131 lung transplants in calendar year 2017, making it the No. 1 volume lung transplant program in the nation.


Temple to seek approvals for multipurpose facility
Campus News
Subtitle: The proposed on-campus stadium project first will go before the City Planning Commission. January 18, 2018Temple President Richard M. Englert today announced that the university is taking "the next step" with its plans for a multipurpose facility that includes a football stadium. The university will file a project submission to the City Planning Commission as it seeks approvals for the proposal.   "We have said from the start that our first priority has been to engage with our neighbors and local leaders to determine the potential for, and impact of, this facility," Englert said. "After more than two years of these discussions, and in light of the project's tremendous value for Temple and North Philadelphia, I have concluded that the time is right to take this step."   Englert emphasized that the university "will continue our conversations with neighbors to address concerns over the impact of the project."   In addition to the stadium, the site has space for prime retail locations along North Broad Street. By including a retail component, Temple intends to create a vibrant, pedestrian-focused experience that will benefit students and the community alike. Other components of the multipurpose facility will include year-round classrooms and meeting and research space.   Temple's decision is the latest development in a process that began in February 2016, when the university's Board of Trustees authorized the development of preliminary studies and designs for a multipurpose retail and stadium project on the northwest corner of Main Campus. The area is bound by Broad Street on the east; Norris Street on the north; 16th Street on the west; and Pearson-McGonigle halls and the Aramark Student Training and Recreation (STAR) Complex on the south.   The proposed site for the facility is located entirely within Temple's existing footprint and owned by the university. With the exception of the closure of 15th Street between Norris Street and Montgomery Avenue, no additional land is needed for the facility. The adjacent Amos Recreation Center, which is owned and operated by the City of Philadelphia, will remain.   Since the board's initial resolution, core elements of the research and development process have included collaborating with community members and government officials to address local residents' concerns, such as noise, parking, traffic and trash.   "These discussions have been invaluable not only in terms of the proposed facility but also in helping us understand and develop better working relationships in the community," Englert said. "It is important for us to be better neighbors, and we have taken a number of steps to address community issues as a result."    Among its initiatives, Temple is working to organize a Special Services District (SSD) around the project site that would oversee dedicated maintenance and services for the benefit of the surrounding community. The SSD would function like those in other parts of the city, particularly in South and West Philadelphia.    [node:sidebar_text]   The university also has instructed designers to minimize the facility's impact when it comes to height, lights and noise. In fact, preliminary plans call for the north end of the stadium to be no higher than adjacent row homes on Norris Street.   The university's review process concluded that a new multipurpose facility, estimated to cost $130 million, will generate significant cost reductions and revenue enhancements as compared to Temple's continuing to play at Lincoln Financial Field.   Project funding for the proposed facility will primarily come from private donations and bonds, the latter supported by funds that would otherwise be paid to rent Lincoln Financial Field, where Temple has exercised lease-extension options for the 2018 and 2019 seasons. Leadership gifts, naming rights and other opportunities are being aggressively pursued and are expected to defray a significant portion of the facility's costs.   Another major selling point for the university is the opportunity to shift game-day festivities onto Main Campus, which has undergone a dramatic transformation in recent years, evolving into an even more vibrant college community.    Game-day traditions--including alumni tents, social activities for families, the team fly-in and more--will be hosted in campus celebration zones modeled on similar pedestrian-focused tailgates that operate successfully at other universities. The hope is to further build a spirit of pride and to give alumni another reason to see Temple's remarkable campus evolution.   "The opportunity to explore bringing the public, alumni and fans back to campus to experience Temple's continuing transformation is one we can't pass up," Englert said. "I am confident we can design and build a facility that makes sense for Temple and for the community.   "Our goal is to build a project that can be a source of pride for Temple, our neighbors and our city," he said.   Temple is taking the next step toward an on-campus multipurpose facility including a football stadium with plans to file a project submission with the Philadelphia Planning Commission.


Fox School earns fourth consecutive No. 1 rank
Campus News
Subtitle: U.S. News & World Report ranked the Fox School of Business’ Online MBA program No. 1 in the nation for the fourth consecutive year and its Online BBA program No. 2 for the second consecutive year. January 10, 2018The online programs at Temple University’s Fox School of Business continue to rank as the best in the nation. For the fourth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report ranked the Fox School’s Online MBA program No. 1, according to the publication’s 2018 rankings of the best online programs, released this week. Fox’s Online Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) retained its No. 2 national rank for the second consecutive year. Fox’s Online MBA is the only Philadelphia-based program ranked in the top 50 by U.S. News. The program integrates online learning with a face-to-face component, opening with a weeklong residency on Temple’s Main Campus. The Online BBA program is the only program in the region to rank among U.S. News’ top 100. “Convenience and flexibility are critical components of high-quality, online-based programs. And as these programs grow in popularity, we at Fox are proud to deliver programs that are yearly ranked as either the best in the nation or among the best in their respective categories,” said Fox School Dean M. Moshe Porat. “Our Online and Digital Learning team has embraced the Fox School’s mission of providing user-friendly and high-quality online curriculum across the undergraduate and graduate levels, and these rankings are a reflection of their continuous efforts.” Learn more about the Fox School’s latest rankings. —Christopher A. Vito   U.S. News & World Report ranked Fox’s Online MBA No. 1 in the nation and Online BBA No. 2 in the nation in its latest rankings of online programs.


Union workers unite to build Temple’s new library
Campus News
Subtitle: Meet six of the hundreds of workers who’ve become a part of Temple’s history by working on the new library rising in the heart of Main Campus. December 13, 2017Sitting in a construction trailer known as the “meeting room,” workers wearing boots covered in dirt and dry mud talk about what it’s like to build one of the biggest capital projects in Temple history: the new library. The four-story, 225,000-square-foot academic commons, at Liacouras and Polett walks, is being built by hundreds of union workers.   Meet six of those workers, who have a combined more than 180 years of experience in their trades. From carpenters and electricians to steel workers, meet the builders making this massive project at the heart of Main Campus come to life.   Name: Gary Hastings Union: Philadelphia Carpenters Union Local 158 Time in the business: 34 years Hometown: “New Jersey. … won’t say any more.” Other projects he’s worked on: Lincoln Financial Field, Citizens Bank Park, Philadelphia Convention Center and Campbell’s Field Daily tasks: “As we speak, we’re in the early stages of laying out the framing, walls, ceilings, doors and hardware.” Interesting fact: “I’m a pretty laid-back guy and I’m a Notre Dame fan.”  --- Name: Joe Burczewski Union: Philadelphia Carpenters Union Local 158 Time in the business: 30 years Hometown: Philadelphia Other projects he’s worked on: Philadelphia International Airport, Philadelphia Convention Center and Microsoft's School of the Future Daily tasks: “As a superintendent, I coordinate with all the other trades and make sure everything is getting done a proper way, and I help with the layout.”Interesting fact: “No, don’t have really anything interesting. I’m an Eagles fan.” ---  Name: Jason Cancellarich Union: Philadelphia Electricians Union Local 98 Time in the business: 17 years  Hometown: Philadelphia Other projects he’s worked on: Philadelphia International Airport, Philadelphia Convention Center and Citizens Bank Park Daily tasks: “We mainly handle all of the electric circuits. These consist of lighting, fire safety signs, telephones, computers, outlets in the floors and basement.” Interesting fact: “Diehard Phillies fan, diehard Cowboys fan.”    ---   Name: Keith Williams Union: Laborers Union Local 332  Time in the business: 18 years Hometown: North Philadelphia Other projects he’s worked on: West Philadelphia High School, Philadelphia Convention Center, Philadelphia Water Treatment Plant and Philadelphia International Airport  Interesting fact: “I love to dance.”    ---   Name: Jim Bozzelli Union: Ironworkers Local 401 Time in the business: 38 years Hometown: Northeast Philadelphia Other projects he’s worked on: Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia Convention Center and the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility Interesting fact: “Big Eagles fan. That’s really it.”   ---   Name: Kevin Whalen Time in the business: 46 years in the Philadelphia Carpenters Local Union 158; 34 years in management. Hometown: I grew up in West Kensington, Philadelphia and currently live in Huntingdon Valley. Daily tasks: “I’m a senior superintendent. I’m in charge of all the operations for the project, coordination for all the trades, as well as communications.” Interesting fact: “Big Philadelphia sports guy. I’m a Philly guy through and through. I’m also the son of an immigrant who was a Union Ironworker local 401, and I care a lot about my wife and three kids.” As the new library rises, construction workers have become familiar faces on campus. Meet six of the union members working on the project.