MANCHESTER COMMUNITY COLLEGE NEWS



MCC Graduate Finds Work with Military-Like Precision
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It's been more than six months since more than 700 members of the New Hampshire Army National Guard's 197th Fires Brigade returned home from Kuwait. And their home state's intensive efforts to help them find jobs seems to be paying off, one soldier at a time. Jim Goss is executive director of Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve. When the 197th Fires Brigade returned, he said, "they were looking at close to 25 percent unemployment." As of February, Goss said, "that number is down to 15 percent." He estimated there are about 125 brigade members looking for jobs; some soldiers are going to school or taking some time off instead. Goss coordinates with other agencies to plan employment workshops and job-search training for returning veterans. And ESGR resurrected a previous program, "Mission One," assigning a volunteer to each component of the brigade. "A good fit" David Fink of Manchester was laid off from his job as a quality-control engineer just before he deployed to Kuwait, so he came home unemployed. He still had his National Guard duty once a month and a part-time position teaching welding technology at Manchester Community College. And he started working with head hunters, sending out resumes and networking. In the end, it was a personal connection that paid off, Fink said; his father ran into someone who was starting a laser welding department at his company, New England Small Tube Corp. in Litchfield. Fink landed the job, which has allowed him to return to his real love, welding. "This was just such a good fit," he said. Denise Roy-Innarelli, an assistant director at New Hampshire Employment Security, said there's a 24-hour "veteran hold" on jobs posted with the state agency so that only those registered as veterans can see them first. And veterans are "flagged" in the system so employers who want to hire vets can easily find them, she said. There's also a new U.S. Department of Defense program, Hero2Hired (h2h.jobs), where employers can post vacancies.


MCC, FPU and Elliot Health System Form Partnership for Bachelor Degree Nursing Education
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A new partnership between Manchester Community College (MCC) and Franklin Pierce University (FPU) will allow students to earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from FPU in one year after earning their Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) from MCC. Students in the Pathway for NH’s Future Nurses program will not have to apply separately to FPU after earning their ADN because they will have been accepted to both colleges as freshmen. By spending most of their first three years at MCC, students will save thousands of dollars in tuition over the cost of attending a traditional four-year college for their BS in Nursing. Elliot Health System (EHS) in Manchester is a key partner in the new program. Students in the Pathway for NH's Future Nurses program will do a 192-hour preceptorship in their third year, working alongside an Elliot RN, an experience not available in a traditional associate degree program. Students accepted into the Pathway program will take courses that meet the requirements of both colleges during their first three years at MCC, receive their ADN, and be eligible to take the RN state board exam (NCLEX-RN). They will then complete their bachelor degree in nursing at FPU during the fourth year. "This new agreement offers real advantages to nursing students who want to achieve their bachelor degree in nursing within four years of beginning their college careers," says MCC President Dr. Susan Huard. "Students in this new program will earn their ADN and be ready to take the RN exam while they're still working towards their bachelor degree. And they’re assured from the first day on MCC's campus that they have a place at FPU to finish their bachelor degree!" "FPU has a strong RN-to-BSN program in place," says Associate Dean John Ragsdale of FPU, "and the graduates of MCC's ADN program consistently show the highest pass rates on the state nursing exams, so they're well-positioned to succeed in our program. Students in the new program will transition seamlessly from MCC to FPU and benefit from the high quality of both programs. It's a win-win-win for the students, for MCC and for FPU." "And it's a win for EHS as well," says Joni Spring, RN, Vice President of Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer at Elliot Health System. "We have a strong relationship with MCC, and have served as a clinical site for their nursing students for many years. We encourage our RNs with associate degrees to continue their education, so this new partnership will help us assure a strong nursing staff throughout our system." Applications will be accepted for the Fall 2012 class after March 8th. Interested students should plan to attend one of the information sessions for details about the Pathway for NH's Future Nurses program.


MCC to Build Student Center
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Manchester Community College will build its first-ever student center this year, a $6 million project, and is launching a multimillion-dollar upgrade of its welding, computer science and automotive programs. Manchester Community College, which has undergone eight incarnations since its founding in 1945 as the State Trade School Manchester on Webster Street — is among seven schools in the community college system sharing $25 million in capital improvement funds approved by the Legislature for the biennium that ends June 30, 2013, according to MCC President Susan D. Huard. The Manchester campus received $9.5 million and will spend $6 million of it on the new student center and $3.5 million on academic improvements. The $6 million student center would be a first for the college that opened at its current site in October, 1966, school officials said. It will be financed through a state bond which will be repaid over 10 years through a $5 per credit fee that students will be assessed beginning July 1, Huard said. "When the bond is paid off, there will be no state money that went in to the student center," Huard said. The expansion and renovation projects are the latest chapter in the community college's ever-evolving mission to provide flexible, affordable educational programs that produce graduates with job skills needed for a changing economy, Huard said. "The college is evolving to serve the people who live here and the jobs that are needed. If we do our jobs right, we will create middle-class taxpayers. That's what we are about," Huard said. "Essentially, our focus is on jobs and where are the careers that students are looking for to give them the ability to make a living wage and build their background," she added. The upgrades include adding four classrooms to the automotive technology center, which is a stand-alone, state-of-the art center with two bays, Huard said. This will enable the college to convert the existing automotive technology center into a new computer science and exercise science lab, she said. In addition, the school will expand its welding lab by 4,000 square feet and convert a former automotive classroom into an advanced manufacturing program, she added. "We are going to bring advanced manufacturing back to Manchester Community College," Huard said. The welding program has successfully placed graduates in jobs at area businesses and industries, she said. The advanced manufacturing program would specialize in training skilled machinists who are now in demand, she said. As for the student center, said Huard, "The students have been asking about a student center for a long time." MCC will be the third community college after Nashua and New Hampshire Technical Institute in Concord to get a student center. The 28,000-square-foot center will replace an existing wing that now houses a cafeteria and lounge. It will include a renovated cafeteria and some offices where student organizations can meet, Huard said. It also will feature the first assembly space large enough to host public and academic events, such as the annual pinning ceremony that is a tradition for the school's nursing students graduates, school officials said. Currently, nursing students must pay to rent outside space to hold the event. The assembly space also can double as a gymnasium, college officials said. The new wing's glass-and-steel facade will face Interstate 293 and connect the upper floors of two sections of the school. It should be complete by next March. The student center will also have a renovated, expanded student-run fitness center. Tia Brien, 21, a third-year business student who serves on the Campus Activities Board, said it took her just a week to obtain the estimated 300 student signatures needed to present their case for a student center to the Legislature last spring. Some students questioned why they should pay for something that wouldn't be open until after they graduated, but "agreed it would definitely benefit the whole college for years to come," Brien said. Others, she added, asked, "Why couldn't this have happened a couple of years ago?" Huard said the school's expanding and changing student population justifies a student center. About 35 percent of its approximately 3,300 students are enrolled in a traditional liberal arts program and intend to transfer to a four-year school once they earn their associate's degree, Huard said. About 20 percent are enrolled in technical and construction programs — the highest number in the history of the college. Another 20 percent are enrolled in its business. MCC enrollment has steadily increased since the recession of 2008 as more — increasingly younger — students turn to community colleges for an affordable education. "People think of us for technical education, but more and more people are looking at us as the affordable option and the flexible option for achieving a college degree," Huard said. Just five years ago, most students were in their late 20s or 30s, had a family and job and "weren't looking to do anything else at school except take their classes and go home," Huard said. The more than one third of the students now enrolled in a traditional liberal arts degree program are looking for more.


President Huard Interview with Northeast Delta Dental Radio
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President Huard was the featured guest on WTPL 107.7 The Pulse's Northeast Delta Dental Radio program on March 3rd. Dr. Huard discussed the great investment that community colleges are in a student's education, in terms of both affordability and transferability. The President also touched on various programs here at MCC, including the Welding and Health Information Management programs, the WorkReadyNH Program, and provided an update on building projects. You can listen to the radio interview below or click here to download a MP3 version. {loadposition news_susanradio}


MCC Grad Named One of Union Leader's 40 Under Forty
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Manchester Community College 2006 graduate Jonathan Lanteigne is one of the "40 Under Forty" of New Hampshire's young people who make a difference. Below is the article from the Union Leader January 30th edition. Jonathan Lanteigne helps others who have faced battles he knows well By Kathy Remillard, Union Leader Correspondent Twenty-six-year-old Jonathan Lanteigne has turned what some would consider a devastating situation into a personal mission to help others. Lanteigne suffered brain damage after a childhood virus and has spent much of his life helping others with brain injuries get the help and services they need. Despite his brain injury, Lanteigne graduated from high school and went on to earn his bachelor of science in computer information systems through UNH Manchester. He's been employed for the past nine years as an Easy Tech at Staples in Bedford. But perhaps Lanteigne's most important contribution is his work for the Brain Injury Association of New Hampshire. Lanteigne has had an advice column in the organization's newsletter since 2002. "Ask Jon" is read by many and helps those with brain injuries secure benefits, education and accommodations, and gives practical advice on what it means to be a brain injury survivor. Lanteigne was recently nominated to sit on the BIANH board. As someone who shares the same experience as those he helps, Lanteigne is able to understand the challenges those with a brain injury have to face. For many, a brain injury doesn't have any outward signs. "That can be troublesome at times," Lanteigne said. Because Lanteigne suffers from short-term memory loss as a result of his injury, he keeps a "reminder binder" of sorts at work with him that assists him with his job duties. He successfully fought to keep it when a new manager at Staples questioned it, but it's just one of the challenges Lanteigne regularly faces. Still, Lanteigne remains steadfast in his goal of helping others. "You have to make use of services that are available," Lanteigne said. "You have to accept your brain injury and find out ways you can help others." Carl Lanteigne, Jon's father, said it's been a long road for his son, but that he has been willing to share both his successes and failures with everyone he meets. "It's a matter of knowing what tools you need to succeed, and not be afraid to use them," he said.


Out with the old, in with the New, Simple, Fast!
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On Monday December 9th, the MCC Marketing and Communications team announced an exciting new venture for Manchester Community College's web presence... a new, shorter, simpler, and faster domain name! Over the next few months, MCC's old domain (www.manchestercommunitycollege.edu) will be phased out and MCC's new domain name (www.mccnh.edu) will be used. If you have any questions, concerns, or general comments about the new domain name and/or the changes involved, feel free to email the MCC Webmaster directly or use the Feedback button on the top left corner of your browser window. This page will be updated frequently as changes to the MCC family of websites are completed. Update December 10th 2011: The MCC Online Photo Galleries and 65th Celebration websites are now available via the new domain name:http://photos.mccnh.eduhttp://65th.mccnh.edu Update December 13th 2011: The MCC Alumni website is now available via the new domain name:http://alumni.mccnh.edu Update December 19th 2011: The main MCC website is now available via the new domain name:http://www.mccnh.edu Anyone who has bookmarked the MCC website (or a specific section of the site) is encouraged to update your bookmark URLs. If, for example, you have a bookmark for http://www.manchestercommunitycollege.edu/student-life/clubs, the Student Life Clubs & Organizations page will now be accessed at http://www.mccnh.edu/student-life/clubs Update January 4th 2012: The Student Information System (SIS) is now available via the new domain name:https://sis.mccnh.edu Some people may see an SSL Certificate error when visiting SIS. It is safe to ignore the warning message and continue on to the SIS login screen as usual. We hope to have this error corrected later today.


MCC to Host College Transfer Fair
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Thinking about transferring your MCC credits to a four-year college? Want to learn more about your transferring options? Then attend the College Transfer Fair on Tuesday, November, 15th from 10am to 1:30pm in the MCC Cafeteria. For more information contact Meg Hamm at (603) 206-8171 or at mhamm@ccsnh.edu. Colleges will include: * American College of History and Legal Studies American International College Assumption College Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology Bryant University Champlain College Chester College College of St. Joseph of Vermont Curry College Eastern Nazarene College Endicott College Granite State College Johnson State College Keene State College New England College Paul Smith’s College Rivier College Simmons College SNHU Springfield College Western New England University Westfield State College University of New England UNH UNH/Manchester Union Institute * Colleges are subject to change


Hassan Announces Campaign for Governor at MCC
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Former state Senator Maggie Hassan announced at MCC October 25 that she is a candidate for governor. Thanking MCC "for the incredibly important work everyone here does," she defined the college as "the place where individuals can chart a new course for themselves and where hard work and commitment pays off. It highlights what is best about our state." Continue reading about Hassan's announcement »


MCC Delivers "Wish List" Items to MST Students
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At a recent Advisory Board meeting for the Manchester School of Technology's Advanced Manufacturing program, Manchester Community College's Vice President for Students Kim Keegan suggested that MST post a "wish list" of items at every school function. The list included 50 4GB USB drives for the students in Dan Cassidy’s Advanced Manufacturing classes. "Dan's students didn't have an affordable way to store their computer-generated work and make a portable portfolio to show potential employers," says MCC's Keegan. Now they do. Keegan worked with MCC's Director of IT Naim Syed and the college has now provided 50 credit-card sized USB drives that include the logos from both MST and MCC.


Veterans Gather at College with the Same Goal: To Find Employment
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MANCHESTER— Steve Hanson stood out among the many veterans looking for work at the Veterans and Military Service Member Job Fair at Manchester Community College Thursday. Hanson looked comfortable in his dark suit, white shirt and conservative tie, and he had neatly trimmed hair and an air of confidence as he wandered strategically along the aisles of the job fair. Hanson, who lives in Nashua, spent 21 years in the U.S. Navy in the submarine force and then joined the work force. Thursday, he was looking for a senior position as a program or business development manager, similar to a position he held for 4-1/2 years in Merrimack before his job was eliminated and he was laid off Aug. 9. “I’ve got two or three leads for jobs,” Hanson said as he went from table to table looking for a company that might offer a good fit. “This is a much better show than a couple of the private ones I went to in Boston.” Hanson and others filled the cafeteria of the college where 40 companies from high tech to insurance, state and federal agencies, police and other emergency responders, and colleges gathered. Some of the veterans wore suits, but many more dressed casually, which was helpful in a building whose air conditioning was knocked out during the October snowstorm. U.S. Rep. Frank Guinta sponsored the fair and said the event was “the least we can do for our returning vets who preserve our freedom and liberties.” He said the fair was a “wonderful opportunity for veterans and their families to find a job.” And Guinta praised the 40 participants who signed up “almost immediately” saying they were ready to hire. Traveling the state, he said, he still hears from many who are unemployed or underemployed. “Hopefully people will leave here today with job opportunities in their hands,” Guinta said. Brian Gordan of Chester served in the Army National Guard public relations unit. Before he was deployed to the Middle East, he was offered his old job back after he had been laid off and hired as a part-time contractor. The job was no longer there when he returned, and he has been unemployed since his deployment ended. “I’m a manufacturing guy,” Gordan said Thursday, but he was also exploring courses at New England College to improve his writing skills. “I’ve got some really good leads for some manufacturing jobs,” he said. Gordan hadn’t yet talked to the representatives at EFI, a company that manufactures large format printers, with a facility in Meredith. “We have 300 employees,” said Wendy Lague, talent acquisition manager. “We’ve got jobs.” Several veterans were at the fair to explore educational opportunities. Delina Bickford of Wolfeboro served in the Navy for three years and is currently a freshman nursing student at Manchester Community College. She wants to continue her education and receive a bachelor’s degree in nursing. She was talking to several college representatives exploring her options. Another Manchester Community College student, Ryan Ladd of Manchester, explored his options for a law enforcement position. Ladd spent four years in the Army and wants to “move forward and better myself.” Noah Fallon of Allenstown, a business administration and small business management student at Southern New Hampshire University, had a couple of leads. He was talking to representatives from Turbocam International, a Barrington-based manufacturing company. “Everybody here is very military friendly and that is nice,” said Fallon, a former Marine. However, Jerry Pageau of Merrimack, a Vietnam veteran and sometime consultant, found the job fair frustrating because some of the companies were offering jobs out-of-state but not in New Hampshire. “So many vets are going to be coming here, but there aren’t 150 manufacturing jobs here,” he said. “It’s very frustrating. There are 25 million out of work.” Pageau moved to New Hampshire form Florida where he worked as a ground penetrating radar expert, training he received in the Navy and through the GI bill, but has been unable to find steady work in the Northeast. His brother-in-law, Gary Gahan of Merrimack, had a different experience at the fair. Gahan is semi-retired and looking for something different to do to be productive. “There are IT jobs here that are way over my head,” said the former Marine who served in Vietnam. “I’m lucky if I can turn on my iPhone and iPad and make them work.” But he noted there were some very interesting positions being offered at the fair, “depending on your skill set.”


Deadline Extended for Nursing Program Applications
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The deadline for applying to the Nursing Program at MCC has been extended to February 1, 2012. Students seeking admission into the Nursing Program must have all documents postmarked no later than February 1, 2012 to be eligible for admission into the Fall 2012 Nursing program. There is no early action or early decision deadline. "Many applicants voiced their concern that transcripts from courses taken at other institutions may not be available for submission by the original deadline of January 1," said Jacqueline Poirier, the MCC admissions counselor who works most closely with nursing applicants. "Acceptance into the Nursing Program is so competitive that we want to be sure that everyone has an opportunity to put their best foot forward." Interested in the MCC Nursing Program? Get started by attending a Nursing Information Session.